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CONFERENCE: MAY 4-8, 1998 • EXPO: MAY 5-7, 1998 
LONG BEACH CONVENTION CENTER • LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 



G ME 
DEVEL PER' 
CONFEREN 




The old place to corrrpete. 




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DIRECTOR 

JENNIFER PAHLKA 

ADVISORY BOARD 

HAL BARWOOD 

TIM BRENGLE 

ALEX DUNNE 

RON GILBERT 

CHRIS HECKER 

ROGER HOLZBERG 

DALE MAUK 

MARK MILLER 

JOHN TAYLOR 

ANNE WESTFALL 

JOSH WHITE 

CONFERENCE DEVELOPMENT 

ALAN YU, 
CONFERENCE CONTENT PRODUCER 

NICOLE TATEM, 
CONFERENCE ASSISTANT 

SALES 

KATHY SCHOBACK, SALES MANAGER 
MARK McCLURE, SALES ASSISTANT 

MARKETING 

GABE ZICHERMANN, 
MARKETING MANAGER 

WER STAFF 

TOM LOFTUS, WEBMASTER 
BRIAN CASE, WEBSITE DEVELOPER 

OPERATIONS GROOP 

GREG KERWIN, 
DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 

SAMANTHA PINNEY, 
OPERATIONS MANAGER 

NATASHA SOUTHWICK, 
CONFERENCE OPERATIONS MANAGER 

KEVIN ODLE, 
CONFERENCE OPERATIONS ASSISTANT 

RAFAEL ROBLES, 
REGISTRATION MANAGER 

ADVERTISING SALES 

CINDY BLAIR (415) 905-2210 
AYRIEN HOUCHIN (415) 905-2788 

PROGRAM PR0D0CTI0N 

GEORGE WALSH, MANAGING EDITOR 

SCOTT BLUM, ART DIRECTOR 

DAVE PEROTTI, 
PRODUCTION MANAGER 

VICE PRESIDENT SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 
CONFERENCE AND SHOW GROOP 

KOANN VIKOREN 

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT 

REGINA STARR RIDLEY 

PRESIDENT AND COO 

DON PAZOUR 



til Miller Freeman 



WELCOME TO THE 



CGDC 



I'm convinced that no one ever reads this letter. Year after year, I'm more sure that the 
energy that goes into saying something meaningful in the opening page of the CGDC 
conference program is brain power sent off into the ether, never to be seen again. It 
makes perfect sense when you think about it: you arrive at the largest gathering of pro- 
fessional game developers in the world and are instantly surrounded by thousands of 
people as passionate and knowledgeable about building games as you are, not to men- 
tion hundreds of companies who can help you build them. The rational response is not 
to open a book and start reading. 

I've had the chance to observe the rational response to this sort of stimulus for a few 
years now. Of course, it doesn't always appear rational. Some of us tend to walk 
around with glazed eyes for the first day, overwhelmed by how large the conference, 
and the game development community, has grown. Many of us arrive to the flurry of 
greetings, reconnections, and embraces that mark this huge "family reunion." This year, 
the conference's first in a new venue, dozens of us will spend our first hours searching 
desperately for the bar, not to drown our sorrows, but because we know from experi- 
ence that front row seating at the lobby bar is more strategic than control of the Suez 
Canal. The smart ones among us will be canvassing the facility for the locations of ele- 
vators, shortcuts, and restrooms in order to be better equipped for the madness that is 
Suite Night. 

However, there are a few parts of this book you should open right away, no matter how 
important your bar location may be. The conference at a glance, found at the end of 
this program, is twelve pages of rock solid knowledge. I'm pleased to say that Alan Yu 
and our esteemed advisory board have put together a collection of hundreds of classes 
you won't find anywhere else in the world. Map your schedule out now or resign your- 
self to missing some of the most interesting and relevant education you can find in five 
short days. And with so many of the world's best technology companies exhibiting this 
year, you'll need a similar plan to make it everywhere you need to be on the Expo floor. 

Now that you know what to look for, stop reading and get out there! With only five 
days and infinite possibilities in front of you, you need all the time you can get. Good 
luck! 




Jennifer Pahlka 
Director 



r fflj^w fl^^v 




Get sucked-in, 

chewed-up & 

spit-out at: 

CGDC, Long Beach, CA 

E3, Atlanta 

Microsoft Meltdown (Summer] 
Seattle, Europe and Tokyo 

ECTS, London 




If you're not living on the edge, 
you're taking up too much space 

And if you can't get cutting edge 3D gaming, why play? 

Slice it up any way you want. Gamers will think your game sucks if they don't get lightning 
speed and razor-sharp 3D graphics. That's why Matrox is sharpening the blades. We're 
about to give you new 3D gaming technology that's worth your best. Technology that will carve its way 
through your 3D games like a scalpel, and spit out the sort of ripping 3D graphics that call for a 
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Cut through to the edge of ultimate arcade-action game play. Get the speed and 3D beautifiers 
necessary to give the "in your face" gamer a good swift kick in the butt. No posers. Code your game 
with Matrox in mind and push gamers right over the cutting edge. 

> Visit our web site at www.matrox.com/mqa or e-mail our Developer Relations Team at devreiramatrox.com 



CGDC Booth #1829 



motion 



TABLE OF 
CONTENTS 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

© 

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SPONSC 

® 

RED SES 

® 

JTORIAL 

® 

MARKETING & DISTRIBUTION 
CONFERENCE 



22 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



CO-SPONSORS 



FEATURED SESSIONS 



TUTORIALS 




MANAGING GAME DEVELOPMENT 
CONFERENCE 

a 

ANALYST BRIEFING 




® 

IFERENI 

® 

R BIOGF 

® 



CLASSIC CONFERENCE SESSIONS 



SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES 



EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 




NEW PRODUCTS 



® 




PRODUCT LOCATOR 

s 

EXHIBITOR INDEX 

® 

CONFERENCE-AT-A-GLANCE 




r 



MAPS 



® 



AME DEVELOP 



GENERAL INFO 



AnENDEE SERVICES 

CONFERENCE AND TUTORIAL 
REGISTRATION 

Convention Center, Lobby 

MONDAY 8:00AM - 6:00PM 

TUESDAY 8:30AM - 8:00PM 

WEDNESDAY 8:30AM - 7:30PM 

THURSDAY 9:00AM - 6:00PM 

FRIDAY 9:30AM -1:00PM 

STARTERPASS REGISTRATION 

Convention Center, Lobby 

MONDAY 12:00PM -6:00PM 

TUESDAY 12:00PM -7:30PM 

WEDNESDAY 11:30AM - 7:30PM 

THURSDAY 9:00AM - 3:30PM 

EXPO FLOOR HOURS 



Convention Center 
Halls A, Band C 

TUESDAY 

WEDNESDAY 

THURSDAY 



4:30PM - 7:30PM 
12:30PM -7:30PM 
10:00AM - 3:30PM 



J0R FAIR HOURS 

Convention Center, Hall C 

TUESDAY 4:30PM - 7:30PM 

WEDNESDAY 12:30PM -7:30PM 
THURSDAY 10:00AM - 3:30PM 







MEALS 

Convention Center 

Breakfast Lunch 

8:30am-10am 12:30pm-2pm 

Mon Room 104 Room 104 

Lobby Lobby 

Tue Room 104 Room 104 

Lobby Lobby 

Wed Convention Exhibit Hall 

Center Lobby 

Thur Convention Exhibit Hall 

Center Lobby 

Fri Convention Room 104 

Center Lobby Lobby 

Meals are available to paid conference atten- 
dees only. 

CONFERENCE ASSOCIATES 

The CGDC is blessed to have the most 
knowledgeable corps of volunteers in the 
industry. Whether you're looking for a 
class, a shuttle bus or a party, you'll 
inevitably need help with something. That's 
when you'll find one of our Conference 
Associates nearby, ready to dispense as 
much information as you can handle. Look 
for them in their identifying t-shirts wher- 
ever CGDC events are taking place. 

LITERATURE TARLES 

Long Beach Convention Center, 2nd floor 

If you have flyers, brochures or other pro- 
paganda to distribute, you're invited to 
place them on the literature tables located 
on the 2nd Floor outside the Grand 
Ballroom. Please check in with the 
Conference Associate in the area and keep 
it limited to one stack of materials. 
Literature distribution is limited to confer- 
ence attendees only. 




COUNTDOWN 



r e b r 



m 



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FEEDBACK 

Yes, feedback. We just don't sit in an office 
and think these things up. The changes 
you see year to year are a direct result of 
your comments, criticisms, kudos or sug- 
gestions. We want your opinions! A con- 
ference evaluation is included in your regis- 
tration packet and individual evaluations 
for each session will be available in the 
session rooms. We implore you to drop 
your completed evaluation in one of the 
"Evaluation" boxes located throughout the 
Convention Center and the Hyatt or hand it 
to a Conference Associate. Better yet, turn 
it in at the CGDC Show Booth on the Expo 
Floor for a free T-shirt. You can even mail it 
to us when you get home, but don't wait 
too long. We're already working on 1999! 
Either way, do your duty and tell us what 
you think by email at cgdc@mfi.com. 



SESSION INFORMATION 



FACILITIES 

Convention Center 

and the Hyatt Regency Hotel 

All conference sessions take place at one 
of the locations listed above. See maps on 
pages 124-128 for more information. 
Conference sessions are open only to paid 
conference attendees, unless otherwise 
noted. 



SESSION TYPES 

Open to conference attendees only: 

Lectures - Involve one or more speakers 
and a speech. Vast wisdom and knowledge 
is imparted. 

Seminars - Involve one or more speakers 
with audience participation highly encour- 
aged. Class sizes are generally limited but 
some are larger to accommodate anticipat- 
ed demand. 

Roundtables - Open discussions on a 
tightly focused topic. Attendance is limited 
so arrive early if you want a seat. Most 
roundtables are offered more than once, so 
check your schedule for repeat times. 
Sponsored Sessions - Classes sponsored 
by exhibiting companies to better deliver 
the nuts and bolts of their message to 
attendees. Look for announcements of new 
products and technologies. 
Tutorials - Day-long intensives offered on 



Monday and Tuesday only. Pre-registration 
is required for tutorials. 
Keynotes - Highlighted sessions are for 
conference attendees only. 

Open to all attendees: 

Plenaries - Featured sessions of general 
interest to all. Open to all attendees. 



EXHIBITOR SERVICES 

EXHIBITOR REGISTRATION 

Convention Center, Lobby 

SUNDAY 10:00AM - 5:00PM 

(MOVE IN ONLY) 
MONDAY 8:00AM - 5:00PM 

TUESDAY 8:00AM - 7:30PM 

WEDNESDAY 8:30AM - 7:30PM 
THURSDAY 9:00AM - 6:00PM 

CGDC INFORMATION 

Convention Center, 1st Floor 

If you need help or have a question, please 
go to the CGDC Information Booth located 
on the lobby level across from registration. 
The Information Booth is open during all 
show hours as well as move-in and move- 
out hours. 



SPEAKER SERVICES 



SPEAKER REGISTRATION 

Speaker registration will take place in the 
Convention Center Lobby during confer- 
ence registration hours. 

SPEAKER READY ROOM 

Convention Center, Room 203B 

All speakers may use this room to prepare 
for their conference sessions. The room is 
equipped with a computer, a printer and 
refreshments. 



PRESS SERVICES 



PRESS REGISTRATION 

Press registration will take place in the 
Convention Center Lobby during confer- 
ence registration hours. 



PRESS L00NGE 

Convention Center, Room 103C 

The press lounge is open during the follow- 
ing hours with refreshments provided each 
day. Exhibitor press kits are available as 
well as an updated schedule of press 
events. 




MONDAY 


12:00PM 


■5:00PM 


TUESDAY 


10:00AM ■ 


• 7:30PM 


WEDNESDAY 


10:00AM ■ 


• 7:30PM 


THURSDAY 


10:00AM 


■ 4:00PM 


FRIDAY 


10:00AM 


■ 2:00PM 


PRESS EVENTS 







For an updated list of press events, includ- 
ing press conferences, please refer to your 
press registration materials, available in the 
Press Lounge. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

CGDC CLASSES 



r 




TRANSPORTATION 

SHUTTLE BUSES 

For your convenience, free shuttle buses 
will circulate between the Convention 
Center and the following CGDC hotels: 

BUS A QUEEN MARY 

WEST COAST HOTEL 

BUS B LONG BEACH MARRIOTT 

HOLIDAY INN AIRPORT 

BUSC SEAPORT MARINA HOTEL 

BEST WESTERN GOLDEN SAILS 

Shuttles will run at approximately 1 5 
minute intervals, Monday through Friday, 
during the following hours: 



MONDAY 

TUESDAY 

WEDNESDAY 

THURSDAY 

FRIDAY 



7:30AM - 10:00PM 
7:30AM -11 :00PM 

7:30AM -11:00PM 
7:30AM - 7:00PM 
7:30AM - 7:00PM 



All bus schedules are tentative. Please check the 
conference addendum for complete schedule. 



RUNABOUT 

The Runabout also offers free shuttle ser- 
vice in the downtown Long Beach area. 
Four routes: Ocean Blvd., Pine Ave., 
Belmont Shore, and Queen Mary Seaport 
run daily. See p. 129 for routes and times. 



(562) 591-2301 

TAXIS 

LONG BEACH YELLOW CAB 
(562) 435-6111 

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION 

LONG BEACH TRANSIT 
(562) 591-2301 



OTHER SERVICES 

BULLETIN B0AR0 
AND MESSAGE CENTEB 

Convention Center, Lobby 

Leave a message for old friends and new 
contacts or check to see if there's a mes- 
sage for you. 

CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE 

Convention Center, Lobby 

To keep track of everything that's going on, 
be sure to check the Conference-at-a- 
Glance set up on bulletin boards in the 
lobby. You'll find the very latest information 
on sessions and events with last minute 
changes updated. 

FIRST AID 

Convention Center, 1st Floor 

Located to the right of the Expo Floor 
entrance at the bottom of the stairs, the 
first aid office is open Monday - Friday 
from 10:00am-6:00pm 



LOST AND FOUND 

CGDC Show Office 

Please check the Show Office during exhib- 
it hours for lost and found information. 



CONFERENCE SESSION ADDI0 TAPES 

Convention Center, 2nd Floor 

Stop by the official CGDC Audio Tape Desk 
to order audio tapes from your favorite ses- 
sions or those special sessions you were 
unable to attend. Special discounts are 
available for on-site or multiple orders. The 
Audio Tape Desk will be staffed during 
open conference hours. After the confer- 
ence, you can call 619-483-4300 or email 
rswan@cts.com to order. 



CGDC T-SHIRT 

The CGDC T-shirt has quickly become a 
coveted collector's item and this year it is 
available free to all paid conference atten- 
dees, speakers and press thanks to our 
friends at S3. Fill out the survey in your 
conference bag and turn it in at the CGDC 
Show Booth on the Expo Floor to receive 
your shirt. T-shirts are also available for 
purchase for StarterPass attendees and for 
individuals who must have more than one! 

PROCEEDINGS 

Abstracts, outlines, notes, code, resources 
and valuable information from most of our 
conference sessions are available for pur- 
chase both printed and on CD-ROM. Stop 
by the CGDC Show Booth during open Expo 
Floor hours or the CGDC Information Booth 
in the Convention Center Lobby to pick up 
your copy at a special on-site price. After the 
conference call 800-444-4881 or 913-841- 
1631 to order. Or, you can order via email at 
orders@mfi.com. 



MASSAGE 

Relax with an on-site massage provided by 
Flying Hands Massage. A certified massage 
therapist will be available on the second 
level of the Convention Center each after- 
noon from 1 :30pm to 7:00pm. Stop by to 
energize and revitalize your tired game 
developer bodies. 

AW0RDAD0UTL0STDADGES 

Please care for your badge as a full 
replacement fee will apply for lost, mis- 
placed or stolen badges. 








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Falcon, Ml Tank Platoon, X-COM, Master of Orion, Civilization, and Gunship are registered trademarks and Master of Magic and Guardians are trademarks of MicroProse, Inc. or its affiliated companies. 
All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



MONDAY, MAY 4 



FRONT LINE AWARDS CEREMONY AND RECEPTION 

SPONSORED BY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 



ANIMATION CONFRONTATION 

SPONSORED BY 



DEVELOPER 

7:00PM-10:00PM 

HYATT REGENCY, THIRD LEVEL 

BEACON BALLROOM A 

Join us as Game Developer magazine honors tool companies that bring innova- 
tive technology advances to the lives of professional game developers! A team 
of 30 expert judges scrutinized hundreds of hardware and software products to 
come up with the winning tools that make your job easier. Don't miss the fes- 
tivities during and after the awards ceremony, complete with giveaways, food 
and drink! 



Full write-ups on the winning products will be published in the June 1998 
issue of Game Developer magazine, available on newsstands May 22nd. 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 



OPENING NIGHT PARTY 

SPONSORED BY 

Logitech 

7:30PM-10:00PM 
CONVENTION CENTER 
GRAND BALLROOM 

Looitech's OneoiA^^^fii^^^j^u^^^^Alii 



evening. Coimbn ove 
and drink, reet up w 
takes' to con^ 
award-winning Digital Weapons. 



jzant to be on Tuesday 




er thel^w for great food 
see if ydl 'have what it 
^j^rusing Logitech's 



PLEASE SEE ADDENDUM FOR OPENING NIGHT ACTIVITIES 



DEVELOPER 

11 :30AM-1 2:30PM 
CONVENTION CENTER 
GRAND BALLROOM A 

The first annual Game Developer magazine Animation Confrontation pits resi- 
dent experts from four leading animation tool companies against one another 
in a live, 1-hour, intense art face-off! Animation challenges developed by Dale 
Mauk of Accolade are put to the test, and may the best tool win! Giveaways 
and wild cheering for all. 

ONLINE GAME TOURNAMENT AND BOOTH CRAWL 



THE PRODUCT CATEGORIES 




SPONSORED BY 


Programming: Environments 


Art: Image Editing & Manipulation 


■ ■ 


Programming: Utilities 


Art: Modeling & 3D Animation 


inte 


Programming: Libraries & APIs 


Art: 2D Animation & Video 


Audio: Music Composition 


Hardware: Audio 




Audio: Sound Editing 


Production: Stock Media 


6:00PM-7:30PM 


Production: Miscellaneous 


Hardware: Graphics 


EXPO FLOOR 


Books 


Hall of Fame Inauguration 





It's happy hour on the Expo Floor! Grab a snack from a participating vendor 
and stroll through the crowds. Breathe in the lively atmosphere, sample the 
various hors d'oeuvres and check out what Intel's up to. Compete live! Join 
fellow competitors at Intel's booth #1637 during the Booth Crawl, where you'll 
play one of the coolest new online games in the Intel Online Game 
Tournament. Check the Conference Addendum for additional vendors partici- 
pating in the Booth Crawl. 

HOSPITALITY SUITE NIGHT 

7:30PM-10:00PM 
HYATT REGENCY 

A CGDC tradition steeped in decadent indulgence; you won't want to miss out 
on the challenge of hitting the numerous parties on Suite Night. When the show 
floor closes, exhibitors open their doors for some of the most creative and hands- 
on opportunities for playing with their products. You'll find food, drinks, demos, 
giveaways, maybe a celebrity or two, possibly a new friend, definitely a great time 
as you make your way around the facilities. Participating companies include: 



ACTIVISION 

ATI TECHNOLOGIES 

DWANGO 

ESS TECHNOLOGY 

GAMASUTRA 

GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON TECHNOLOGY 

GT INTERACTIVE 

KESMAI 

KINETIX 

MATROX GRAPHICS 

MGM INTERACTIVE 

MICR0PR0SE 

MICROSOFT 

SEGASOFT/HEAT 



SUITE 1726 
SEAVIEW C 
SUITE 1707 
SUITE 936 
SUITE 132 
SEAVIEW A 
SUITE 636 
SUITE 836 
SUITE 336 
SUITE 536 
SUITE 1236 
SUITE 736 
BEACON A AND ROTUNDA 
BEACON B 








SEGA OF AMERICA 

SOFTIMAGE 

VIRGIN INTERACTIVE/WESTWOOD STUDIOS 

VIRTUAL SEARCH 

WRITER'S GUILD 

YOSEMITE ENTERTAINMENT/SIERRA ON-LINE 



SEAVIEW B 
POOLSIDE 
SUITE 436 
SUITE 1136 
SUITE 1715 
SUITE 1036 



CHECK THE CONFERENCE ADDENDUM FOR ADDITIONAL PARTICIPATING 
COMPANIES 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 



SPOTLIGHT AWARDS 

PRODUCED BY 



COMPUTER 
GAME /■•••. 
DEVELOPERS '"■•. 
ASSOCIATION ,M 



6:30PM-8:00PM 
QUEEN MARY 
QUEEN'S SALON 

The Spotlight Awards recognize outstanding, creative and/or technical contri- 
butions in the field of interactive entertainment. Award recipients are chosen 
by CGDC attendees and members of the Computer Game Developers' 
Association. Emphasis is on excellence within specific technologies and across 
game genres and platforms. Don't miss out! These are the only awards given to 
developers by their peers. 

FIRST ANNUAL GAMERAVE CHARITY CHALLENGE 

SPONSORED BY 



M 1 I N 




COMPUTER 
GAME / '•••. 
DEVELOPERS' 
CONFERENCE 1 



FACTORY 

8:00PM 
QUEEN MARY 

It's an evening of titanic proportions aboard the Queen Mary for GameRave 
'98. Duel your favorite game developer in the Challenge Arena, get lucky in the 
casino room or enter the charity raffle to win a cruise to Mexico. Bring your 
passport, which you'll find in your conference bag — we're sailing the world 
with food and drinks from your favorite ports o' call. Join the "rabble with a 
cause" - we're pirating the ship for charity. 



ON-LINE LIVING ROOM 

SPONSORED BY 



'*±£f: 




CO-SPONSORED BY GAMASUTRA 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 ■ 
EXPO FLOOR 
BOOTH 1455 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 



When it's time to rest your weary feet, exhausted from walking the expansive 
Expo Floor, stop by the On-Line Living Room, located in the back of the Expo 
Hall. Check your email, surf the web or just indulge yourself in the visual 
splendor of this hip, on-line oasis complete with Public PCs provided by the 
National Amusement Network. Take a breather and relax in our unique, one- 
of-a-kind setting - it's like nothing you've ever seen before — unless, of course, 
you were at last year's show. 

TECHNOLOGY INCUBATOR BOOTH 

SPONSORED BY 



DEVELOPER 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 
EXPO FLOOR 
BOOTH 2035 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 



As the game market gets more crowded, it's essential to investigate new tech- 
nologies that can give your game a fresh look & feel, new capabilities, and bet- 
ter performance. Since groundbreaking ideas sometimes come from small com- 
panies without the financial resources to exhibit, Game Developer magazine is 
hosting a few hot, hand-picked innovative technologies at CGDC. Stop by the 
Technology Incubator, and see what's hatching! 

SPOTLIGHT AWARDS PAVILION 

TUESDAY, MAY 5 - THURSDAY, MAY 7 
EXPO FLOOR 
BOOTH 2019 
PRODUCED BY 

COMPUTER 
GAME /' ■■•-. 
DEVELOPERS '"••.. 
ASSOCIATION™ '•• 

This year we will be spotlighting the winning games chosen by you, the CGDC 
attendee. Games will be chosen for their outstanding, creative and/or technical 
contributions to the field of interactive entertainment. Join us Thursday night 
when the developers will receive recognition for their achievements at the 
Awards Ceremony. Share the excitement of this event by stopping by and 
checking out the most exciting and innovative games of the year! 




AME DEVELOP 




VINTAGE ARCADE 

TUESDAY, MAY 5 - THURSDAY, MAY 7 
EXPO FLOOR 

Slow down for a second. Take a step back in time. 
Wander the Vintage Arcade and revisit your favorite 
oldies - PacMan, Galactica, Centipede, and more. Put 
your hands on the controls and lean your butt back; 
soon you'll feel like you never left the bowling alleys 
and arcades of your youth. It's an all-play, no-pay 
highlight of the Expo Floor this year so check it out. 

DIGITAL DRIVE-IN 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 2:00-3:00 
THURSDAY, MAY 7 3:30-4:30 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 2:00-3:00 

CONVENTION CENTER 
ROOM 103A 

New to the CGDC for 1998, come see the best game 
animation work of the year at the Digital Drive-in. 



MEETINGS 



SIGTEST 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
CONVENTION CENTER 
ROOM 103A 



1:00PM-2:00PM 



This meeting is open to testers, guality assurance 
staff, producers, and all game developers wanting 
to network with other people in the pursuit of 
releasing quality, error-free games. This social ses- 
sion is an opportunity to swap names, cards and 
war stories. 

CGDA ANNUAL MEETING 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 1:00PM-2 :00PM 

CONVENTION CENTER 
ROOM 102A 

All CGDA members are urged to attend. Non-mem- 
bers and prospective members are welcome too, 
subject to seating availability! The meeting will 
consist of Members of the Board who will update 
the Community on the achievements, status and 
goals for the Association, solicit member feedback 
and answer questions. The success of the CGDA 
depends on your participation and involvement! 

IA-SIG MEETINGS AT CGDC 

The Interactive Audio Special Interest Group (IA- 
SIG) exists to allow developers of audio software, 
hardware, and content to freely exchange ideas 
about interactive audio. The goal of the group is to 
improve the performance of interactive audio appli- 
cations by influencing hardware and software 
design, as well as leveraging the combined skills of 
the audio community to make better tools. 
Membership includes game developers, composers, 
audio technology providers, and equipment and 
component manufacturers. All are welcomed at 
the following IA-SIG meetings: 



IA-SIG GENERAL MEETING 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 5:00PM-8:00PM 

CONVENTION CENTER 
ROOM 103A 

The co-chairmen will present an overview of the 
SIG's progress since the last CGDC and their vision 
of the future of the organization, followed by 
reports from the chairpersons of several working 
groups. 

3D AUDIO WORKING GROUP 
MEETING 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 3:30PM-4:30PM 

CONVENTION CENTER 
ROOM 103A 

The 3DWG has a charter to make 3D audio envi- 
ronments possible through publishing guidelines 
and standards for audio rendering. The work has 
focused on standard PC systems to ensure broad 
industry support. The goal is to produce realistic 
sound environments for multimedia PC systems. A 
common language for 3D audio technologies and 
testing criteria are also in process. 

PERFORMANCE ANIMATION 
SOCIETY 

MONDAY, MAY 4 7:00PM-8:00PM, 

CONVENTION CENTER 
ROOM 103A 

Computer Games get a "Face Lift." Motion 
Capture and Performance Animation techniques 
are valuable tools in adding realism to character 
animation in Computer Games. These tools are 
being focused and refined even further with the 
growing need for believable and accurate facial 
animation in gaming characters. The Performance 
Animation Society will present some late-breaking 
developments and applications of facial expression 
capture and image processing as they apply to 
enhancing expressiveness in computer game char- 
acters. Videos and demonstrations will augment 
the presentation. The meeting is free and all who 
are interested are welcome to attend this exciting 
meeting. 

COMPUTER GAME ARTISTS 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 3:30PM- 5:00PM 

CONVENTION CENTER 
ROOM 202A 

The CGA exists to form a community of computer 
game artists that interact with (share, learn, teach, 
influence) each other and their industry. The CGA is 
designed for full-time professional artists who have 
years of experience in the game industry. 
Wannabes, curious programmers, managers, tool- 
makers, press, and others are also welcome to 
come see what happens when we artists get 
together! Our membership policy is open, but our 
content is focused on benefiting the typical profes- 
sional game artist. Join us. 



RELATED EVENTS 




IMMERSION 98 

SUNDAY, MAY 3 
HYATT 

The primary objective of Immersion is to educate, 
enhance and expose the development community 
to the industry's premiere 3D gaming performer, 
3Dfx Interactive. Immersion is an opportunity to 
pull together the finest of the gaming industry's 
developers in an environment that fosters growth 
and learning, all while having fun and making new 
contacts, not to mention the reason we all go to 
conferences, the cool giveaways. Immersion also 
serves as a time for 3Dfx Interactive to reward the 
development community for its outstanding sup- 
port, thorough premium gifts, an industry award 
ceremony, high profile entertainment, and insight 
into what's up and coming from 3Dfx Interactive 
before the general public hears about it. 




MICROSOFT- DIRECTX™ 
SEMINAR 

SATURDAY, MAY 9 
CONVENTION CENTER 

You are committed to building the best computer 
games. And we're committed to giving you the best 
platform for audio, graphics and internet multime- 
dia with Microsoft DirectX. Here is your opportunity 
to get the latest information on developments - 
straight from the source - at the most comprehen- 
sive conference on DirectX gaming technology. 

Stop by the Microsoft DirectX trade show booth 
and register to attend the Microsoft DirectX 
Seminar. 

Hop Topics will include: 

Programming for Direct 3D Immediate Mode 
DirectMusic Core Programming 
Advanced DirectSound Programming 
DirectX Performance Tuning 

and much, much more! Find out how to use DirectX 
to get all of your unique ideas out of your head and 
into your games. Just $1 50 gets you access to the 
latest technologies. 








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CONFERENCE KEYNOTE 



LEGENDS OF GAME DESIGN 



WEDNESDAY, MAY D, 5:00 6:00 



TERRACE THEATER, CONVENTION CENTER 



THIS SESSION IS OPEN TO REGISTERED CONFERENCE ATTENDEES ONLY 

CGDC's Legends of Game Design series returns in 1998 to ask four design gurus of both the past and present 
about: differences between lone wolf and team development; the technology shifts which affected their designs 
the most; the most difficult design challenges they've faced; to describe their favorite designs and worst mistakes. 




Richard Garriott 

His first game was published in 
1979, making Richard Garriott, 
author of the best-selling Ultima 
series, a true veteran of the com- 
puter gaming industry. Throughout 
his career, Richard has received 
extensive praise and numerous 
awards including, Computer 
Gaming World's 1 5 Most Influential 
Industry Players (#4) and Next Generation's America's Elite. 

As a teenager, Richard began developing games for his Apple 
computer. While in high school, he showed the manager of the 
Texas computer store he was working in (part-time) a copy of 
his current project - Akalabeth. Without telling Richard, the 
manager sent a copy of the game to a software publisher, who 
bought it on the spot. Ultima I soon followed, and by the time 
Ultima II was released in 1981, publishers were vying to sign 
him on. The Ultima series has gone on to become one of the 
longest and most successful series in the history of entertain- 
ment software. 

In his spare time, Richard is an avid seeker of adventure. 
Although the stereotype of computer "hackers" portrays them 
eternally peering at their computer screen in a darkened room, 
Richard loves boxing, rock climbing, spelunking, scuba diving 
and hang gliding. Most recently, he embarked on a trip to 
Antarctica where he and his fellow adventurers searched for 
meteorites. 

Richard is also an avid astronomer and astrophotographer. In 
fact, his house in Austin has an observatory on the third floor 
with a four meter dome! In 1994, Richard purchased a Soviet- 
made lunar land rover, which still resides on the moon. This 
vehicle gives Richard the distinction of being the only private 
owner of a man-made object located on a foreign celestial body. 
Richard's interest in space was inspired by Richard's father, 



Owen Garriott, who was one of the first six scientist-astronauts 
selected by NASA to travel into space. 

"Lord British" is the pseudonym under which Richard creates 
the Ultima series. Lord British also appears as principal character 
in the series. The Ultima saga transpires in the realm of 
Britannia; Lord British is the benevolent ruler of this oft-belea- 
guered land. In 1997, the Ultima series ventured into the realm 
of the Internet with the release of technologically groundbreak- 
ing title, Ultima Online. 

Richard was born July 4, 1961, in Cambridge, England, while 
his father was teaching electrical engineering on loan from 
Stanford University. Richard's roommates at the University of 
Oklahoma are responsible for conferring his title upon him. At 
their first meeting, Richard used the decidedly un-midwestern 
greeting, "hello." Since no around there used that arcane form, 
they decided he must be from England. His nickname from that 
day on has been "British." 

Ron Gilbert 

While players were interfacing with 
early adventure games through a text 
parser, Ron Gilbert was at work 
planning the next step. The fruits of 
his labor became known as the 
SCUMM engine - with no disre- 
spect to its achievement toward 
affecting computer adventure gam- 
ing - and was used in LucasArts' 
(then Lucasfilm Games) premiere 
adventure, Maniac Mansion. The SCUMM engine allowed one to 
construct commands elegantly with the mouse, without the 
need for typing. Over the years, SCUMM has been refined and 
now uses fewer words and more icons. It has been used in all 
LucasArts adventure games since Maniac Mansion. 

In addition to the SCUMM engine, Ron introduced other ele- 





merits in adventure game design, such as never allowing the 
player be killed, which eliminated the need to repeatedly restore 
their game in order to continue. Ron is also credited with invent- 
ing cutscenes, the noninteractive movies or animations that are 
used to break up the action and propel the plot and story for- 
ward. (Soonafter, almost all games began to incorporate them 
into their designs). Finally, Ron is known for his classic Monkey 
Island series which melded humor with adventure gaming, get- 
ting away from staid medieval themes of good vs. evil. 

Ron took his creative prowess and helped found the edu- 
tainment company Humongous Entertainment. He recently 
formed a new division at Humongous called Cavedog 
Entertainment, where he returns his focus to non-educational 
gaming. Humongous' debut product is the real-time strategy 
game Total Annihilation. 

Sid Meier 

Recognized as one of the true pio- 
neers of computer game design, Sid 
Meier has been honored with virtu- 
ally every major award in the gam- 
ing industry. Just a glance at his 
career reveals a series of "firsts". 

In 1982, Sid teamed up with 
former pilot "Wild Bill" Stealey 
to found MicroProse Software, 
one of the first companies to 
produce high-quality computer entertainment. While 
there, Sid created the very first combat flight simulator, F- 
15 Strike Eagle, a title which has sold well over one mil- 
lion copies since its initial release. After F-15, Sid's win- 
ning titles kept coming. He created the industry's first 
submarine simulation with Silent Service. And with the 
breakthrough Pirates!, Sid introduced a unique blend of 
historical simulation, arcade action, strategy and role- 
playing that opened new doors in computer game design. 

Sid's unique devotion to creating games that are together 
original, thought provoking and fun is well documented. By 
introducing strategy into flight simulation with F-19 Stealth 
Fighter, he made that title one of the most popular flight sims 
ever. And with his addictive strategy games like Sid Meier's 
Railroad Tycoon and Civilization, he ushered a new genre of 
"God Games" into computer gaming. In fact, Civilization earned 
such a following that it went on to become one of the best 
known titles in the industry with sales approaching one million 
units and it was recently honored as the number one best game 
of all-time by Computer Gaming World magazine. 

Sid continues to be on the leading edge of entertainment 
software. His most recent work on CPU Bach, a music compos- 
ing program, and Magic: The Gathering, a role-playing adven- 
ture, has taken artificial intelligence to a new level. 

As chairman and director of creative development for Firaxis 
Games, Sid leads development efforts to create innovative strat- 
egy and simulation games that players of all computer experi- 
ence levels will enjoy. 




David Perry 

David Perry has always had a pas- 
sion for video games. He first start- 
ed programming in 1981 when his 
father brought home a tiny comput- 
er, the ZX81. Within a year, his pro- 
grams were published in an anthol- 
ogy entitled Astounding Arcade 
Games. By 1985, David pro- 
grammed his first commercial hit for 
UK publisher Mikro Gen. Pyjamarama, as it was called, spawned 
a series of successful sequels that caught the eye of Probe 
Software, who hired him on the spot. At Probe he created 
Trantor - The Last Stormtrooper, Smash TV, Savage, and 
Supremacy (with artist Nick Bruty). All were huge hits. 

Once more, success set the headhunters on the trail, and 
both Nick and David were poached by Virgin Interactive. There 
they produced Cool Spot, Global Gladiators and the mega-hit, 
Disney's Aladdin. David then left Virgin and formed Shiny 
Entertainment in 1993 and a string of successes followed: 
Earthworm Jim and Earthworm Jim 2 topped the charts, gave 
birth to a TV show, comics, a range of action figures, and put 
Shiny firmly on the map. In 1996, David sold the company to 
international publisher, Interplay Productions, and produced 
their first PC success, MDK. 

1 998 will be Shiny's biggest ever year. Shiny teams are cur- 
rently working on no less than four titles for the PlayStation and 
PC: Messiah, The Wild 9, R/C Stunt Copter and Sacrifice. David 
has interest from movie companies to develop his Wild 9 and 
MDK properties, and Shiny is leading the industry in 3D action- 
games technology - the single most popular and lucrative genre 
in video gaming today. Not bad for a boy from County Antrim in 
Northern Ireland who started out with a ZX81, and a passion for 
video games- an industry many people believed was nothing 
more than a passing fad in 1 98 1 . 

Johnny Wilson 
(Moderator) 

Johnny Wilson combines his 
talents as a professor, critic, 
philosopher and writer to cre- 
ate his divine role, which he 
describes as more than a man- 
ager. Johnny is credited for 
setting the tone of Computer 
Gaming World, in everything 
from journalistic philosophy to 
methodology to vision, developing coherent strategy for 
the way the magazine operates now and how it will 
evolve toward the future. 




COMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 







©in N©wl 




1998 Ashley Hall" 



Check us out on the net at www.cgda.org. 

or contact us via mail, phone, or email 
960 N. San Antonio Rd. #125, Los Altos, Ca. 94022 

650-948-2432 
info@cgda.org 



PLENARIES 



THESE SESSIONS ARE OPEN TO ALL CONFERENCE AND STARTERPASS ATTENDEES 



3305 

MESSIAH: WHAT YOU MAY OR MAY NOT BELIEVE 

MICHAEL "SAXS" PERRSON & DAVID PERRY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Ballroom A, Convention Center 



2:00-3 :OOPM 



If you don't pitch your idea as "Command & Conquer" with big breasts, then 
don't be stupid enough to expect a publisher to actually fund it. These days, 
publishers are clinging on to what they call "Triple A" titles. What they really 
mean is that since we all stopped going to Las Vegas for the trade shows, they 
are not willing to gamble any more. The result: frustrated developers, frustrated 
public, tired genres, and multiple named versions of the same old games. This 
session explores running a company from a programmer's point of view, 
investing in the future, "a programmer hiring programmers" and demonstrates 
what you end up with, by discussing the infamous Messiah engine. 

4105 

3D CONTROLLERS ONE YEAR LATER: WHAT HAVE 
LEARNED? WHAT HAVE WE EARNED? 

TOM CMAJDALKA, FRANK EVERS, JAY EISHENLOHR, JON PEDDIE 
& SCOTT SELLERS 



THDRSDAY, MAY 7 
Ballroom B, Convention Center 



10:00-11 :00AM 



It's now it's one year later, 38 million new 3D controllers have been shipped 
bringing the total installed base to 53 million and the baseline PC has risen to 
1 66 MHz. Are all the games taking advantage of these parts? Are they using a 
z-buffer (yet)? Are they any better for trying? Will they ever be as good as a 
console game? What's the problem this year? No AGP? No floating point 
power? No understanding of 3D hardware? Are we DOOMed to playing 
restricted-view limited-object single-person shoot-em-up games or (slowly) 
watching beautiful Riven images? When will the picture change? 

4318 

THE FUTURE OF C0IN-0P GAMES 

JOHN FOWLER, JOHN LATTA, TOM PETIT, MATT SAETTLER, ALBERT TENG 
& JEFF WALKER 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

202 B, Convention Center 



2:00-3 :00PM 



Learn about the exciting opportunities PC-based arcade offers to game devel- 
opers in the multi-billion dollar coin-op market. Join a number of leading Open 
Arcade Architecture (OAA) forum members who share their insights on what 
makes a great arcade game, understanding the differences in creating hit 
arcade games and hit home games, making money in the arcade market, and 
how to use arcade as a first-run theater for titles headed for the home. 

4517 

THE FUTURE OF MULTIPLAYER ONLINE GAMING 

DEAN FROST, ERIC HACHENBURG, BOB HUNTLEY, GARY GRIFFITHS, 
PAUL MATTEUCHI& JOHN TAYLOR 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
104B, Convention Center 



5:00-6 :00PM 



future of multiplayer online gaming. The usual suspects, including business 
models, advertising, technology advances, latency, and exponential growth are 
rounded up and flogged. Hear what's been learned this past year and if the 
future holds more or less of the same. 

3222 

GAME DEVELOPER MAGAZINE'S ANIMATION 
CONFRONTATION 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

Ballroom A, Convention Center 



11 :30 AM TO 1:00 PM 



The first ever Game Developer Animation Confrontation pits game art experts 
from leading animation tool companies against one another in a live art face- 
off. Animation challenges developed by Dale Mauk of Accolade are put to the 
test, and may the best tool win. Come cheer on your favorite animation pack- 
age as the live action whisks across giant screens, and grab some giveaways 
while you're at it! Participants include Kinetix, NewTek, and Softimage. 

Refer to the conference addendum for the judging panel and futher participants. 




Hear talking heads from Dwango, Heat, Kesmai, Mpath and Ten discuss the 



n:iarn^»tf^ T ainL¥^nf7[H^iiniik^i 



YOu eat, sleep, and breathe games. YOu strategize, dominize, and 
conquerize. YOu know monsters. YOu kill monsters. YOu imagine, 
dream and create. YOu illustrate, animate and model. YOu 
research, develop and code. YOu live for the build. YOu kill for the 
deadline. YOu know what it takes to make the game rock. Failure 
is not an option. YOu are "GAME GOD" -(lets talk). Engineering 
Animation Inc., Salt Lake City is looking for EXPERIENCED 
Project Managers, Game Designers, Graphic Designers, Production 
Artists, Software Engineers, and 3D Animators. Send 
resume via FAX 801.325.6801 or email us at 
slcjobs@eai.com 



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COMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 



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DEVELOPERS *••• 
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sponsored by- 




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GAMES REWIRING OUR MINDS 

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THESE SESSIONS ARE OPEN TO ALL CONFERENCE AND STARTERPASS ATTENDEES 



GAMES AND CHILDREN: JUST FUN AND FANTASY? 

PRESENTED BY MEDIASCOPE, IN ASSOCIATION WITH PCI 
DR. JEANNE FUNK, HAL JOSEPHSON, DEBRA LIEBERMAN 
& EUGENE PROVENZO 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
103A, Convention Center 



10:00 - 11 :00 



The debate rages on. Are video games having a negative effect on children? 
Are they simply escapist fun, or are they actually teaching skills that help (or 
harm) children in their development? In this session, experts review the latest 
research on the impact of games on children and explore how games help 
shape attitudes. This session attempts to isolate ways in which positive infor- 
mation can be conveyed without losing entertainment value. 

THE IMPACT OF GAMES ON CHILDREN 

REFER TO CONFERENCE ADDENDUM FOR PANELISTS 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

103A, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



This session looks at this issue from another angle - from that of the children 
themselves. Kids, ages seven to twelve, discuss their personal experiences with 
games. Who buys the games 7 Which do they like best? How much time do the 
spend playing them? Do they trade games with friends? Do they play with 
other players? How would they design a ratings system? What have they 
learned about the world around them from games? 

GOT ANYTHING FOR GIRLS? 

PRESENTED BY MEDIASCOPE, IN ASSOCIATION WITH PCI 

CECILIA BARAJAS, ANNIE FOX, YASMIN KAFAI, KAVERI SUBRAHMAYAM 

& ALEX UTTERMAN 



THURSDAY, MAY 

101 B, Convention Center 



2:00 - 3:00 



Girls comprise 51 % of the population, yet they hold only a small percentage of 
the gaming market audience. This session engages developers of girl games, 
researchers and industry analysts in a discussion of what's hot in this untapped 
realm of interactive media. This lecture zones in on what girls really want, why 
boys have traditionally played more computer games than girls, and reveals 



insights into the girls marketplace. Panelists explore who's trying to reach 
girls, who is succeeding, and why. 

ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT: CAN DIGITAL 
ENTERTAINMENT GROW UP? SHOULD IT? 

SONNY FOX &J.C.HERZ 



THURSDAY, MAY 6 
101 B, Convention Center 



3:30 - 4:30 



Right now, developers have figured out what makes gamers tick. Products for 
the hardcore game audience get better and better every year as technology 
allows us to throw more pixels per second onto the screen. But at some point, 
there are diminishing returns - the diehard gamers' expectations continue to 
rise rapidly, and their numbers do not. Is it enough for the industry to address 
the needs of this zealous, albeit limited number of people (who grow up into a 
development community making games for diehards, by diehards)? Or does 
interactive entertainment need to grow beyond the bounds of the traditional 
gaming audience? And if developers decide to stretch the envelope to reach 
new people, does that represent a compromise? Does this medium really lend 
itself to diversity? Can it evolve without being dumbed down. Are there trade- 
offs as the medium matures? Or does it just get more interesting, and poten- 
tially more profitable 7 

IMAGES OF WOMEN ON THE SCREEN 

BONNIE CAMPBELLS DR. ASTRID HEGER 

REFER TO CONFERENCE ADDENDUM FOR ADDITIONAL PANELISTS. 

THURSDAY, MAY 6 5:00-6:00 

101 B, Convention Center 

What is the role of interactive entertainment as impacts violence against 
women? The characterization of women in games may have a far reaching tra- 
jectory in the minds and hearts of gamers around the world. This session hopes 
to shed some light on this rather large and complicated issue. 



Population Communications International 

Population Communications International (PCI) works creatively with the media to motivate people to make choices that influence population trends 
favoring sustainable development and environmental protection. Currently PCI is turning its attention to the computer games industry to stimulate dia- 
logue around issues of games and social responsibility. PCI is best known for producing radio and television soap operas in developing countries. The 
charaders in these productions become role models for the elevation of the status of women, use of family planning, AIDS prevention, and other relat- 
ed values. 



Mediascope is a national, non-profit public policy organization founded in 1992 to promote construdive depictions of health and social issues in the 
media, particularly as they relate to children and adolescents. A principal objedive of Mediascope is to encourage accurate and responsible portrayals 
in film, television, the Internet, video games and music - without compromising creative freedom. 



COMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' C0NFE0ENCE 



TUTORIALS 



101 PG 

ADVANCED OPENGL GAME 
DEVELOPMENT 

MICHAEL GOLD, MARK KILGARD 
& RICHARDS. WRIGHT JR. 
104 A, Convention Center 

This tutorial quickly reviews the basics of 
developing with OpenGL, then jumps right 
into discussing advanced rendering tricks 
with lighting, texture mapping, and multipass 
rendering. Other topics include techniques 
for maximizing performance and using 
OpenGL with DirectX, and looking ahead to 
new features, extensions, and hardware 
capabilities. Some familiarity with OpenGL is 
recommended. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

CGDC CLASSES 



102 PG 

CREATING GAMES WITH JAVA 

LARRY O'BRIEN 

104 B, Convention Center 

Whether you're interested in Java's potential for 
massive, multi-user network games, advanced arti- 
ficial intelligence and artifical life techniques, or 
just cutting programming effort by 25-30%, you 
owe it to yourself to understand Java and the Java 
Virtual Machine's performance characteristics. This 
class shows you how to use advanced object-ori- 
ented design techniques to get the most from Java 
from an independent, in-the-trenches developer. 
Attendees will receive a "Hands-On Java" training 
CD-ROM containing over 1 5 hours of audio lec- 
tures and 1 5,000 lines of code in 320 working Java 
programs. 



TWO-DAY TUTORIALS 

MONDAY, MAY 4 AND TOESDAY, MAY 5 
10:00AM 6:00PM 

103 

3D STUDIO MAX R2 

MARK WILLIAMSON 
101 A, Convention Center 



This class guides participants through the process 
of creating and animating a character in 3D Studio 
Max R2. Topics include the technical aspects of 
modeling both high and low polygon counts; using 
native tools and third party plugins; various 
methodologies for animating, including the use of 
animation controllers; aesthetic techniques for cre- 
ating convincing movement and behaviors for your 
character. Focus is divided between technical con- 
cerns and artistic methods. 



105 VA 

SOFTIMAGE GAME 
DEVELOPMENT TOOLS & 
TECHNIQUES 

DANIEL BEAUDRY, ALEXANDRE JEAN CLAUDE & 
PIERRE T0USIGNANT 
102 A, Convention Center 

This tutorial takes an in-depth look at creating 
games with SOFTIMAGE|3D v3.7SP1 . The first day 
of the course covers modeling, texturing, and ani- 
mation tools in SOFTIMAGE|3D, including issues 
specific to game developers such as efficient 3D 
models, color palette optimization, and working 
with image maps. The second day covers games 
import/export (Sony PSX, Nintendo64, DirectX, etc), 
as well as introducing the new SOFTIMAGE|GDK 
games development toolkit. 



& 





201 PG 

PROGRAMMING GAMES UNDER 
WINDOWS 

MATTPRITCHARD 

102 B/C, Convention Center 

This tutorial teaches you how to take control of 
Windows, put it to work, and make top-notch 
Windows games. You'll delve into all of Windows' 
major and minor areas to extract the relevant 
knowledge needed to create a great game that 
shines in all areas of its execution. Topics covered 
include: the Windows message queue, customizing 
windows and user interface components, control- 
ling the screen, palettes and color handling, audio 
and video playback, rendering and blitting graph- 
ics, communications, and Internet play, input 
devices of all sorts, setup programs, Windows 95vs. 
NT, multithreading, compression, development 
tools and aids, debugging your game, and how to 
get a handle on DirectX. This tutorial does not go 
in-depth on Direct3D, OpenGL, or DirectPlay. 



ONE-DAY TUTORIALS 

TUESDAY, MAY 5 
10:00AM 6:00PM 



202 GO 

WRITING FOR AN INTERACTIVE 
AGE 

LEE SHELDON 

201 A, Convention Center 

To acquire a true understanding of the issues 
involved in writing and designing interactive enter- 
tainment, you must break all the elements down to 
their core ingredients, examine each element, and 
find a comfortable home for it in the final product. 
This tutorial gives you the tools to create entertain- 
ment in which a compelling story and rich game- 
play exist. Topics include: elements of film lan- 
guage and game language; story, character, dia- 
logue, emotion, conflict, editing, POV and pace; the 
importance of a consistent style and the inclusion 
of universal themes; interactivity; non-linearity; 
puzzles; conversing with other actors; online/mulit- 
player; and creating the perfect balance between 
drama and gameplay to produce exciting and com- 
mercially successful interactive entertainment. 




204 PD 

THE ART OF TESTING GAMES 

JEANNE COLLINS, MEGAN QUATTR0CCHI 
& RANDALL WILLIAMS 
103 A, Convention Center 

You've got your game idea design and you've even 
started programming, but how do you make sure 
it's going to work? Especially, how do you get it to 
work on all those machines that your audience 
might want to run it on? And who is the audience? 
This one-day tutorial prepares you to plan and exe- 
cute focus testing, gameplay testing, functionality 
testing, hardware compatibility testing and games 
beta testing. 

205 VA 

IDEA TO COMPLETION: CREATING 
REAL-TIME 3D GAME GRAPHICS 

JOSH WHITE & JEFF LANDER 
201 B, Convention Center 

Real-time 3D graphics (RT3D) is the backbone of 
most modern games. Come get hype-free ground- 
ing about modern RT3D in games. This tutorial cov- 
ers the whole production process and RT3D experi- 
ence by answering questions such as: Should you 
buy an existing 3D engine or build you own? How 
exactly do you get art out of modeling software 
and into your game? If it's your first, second, or 
third RT3D project, or if you're changing profes- 
sions, this tutorial is for you. 

206 PG 

GAME DEVELOPMENT IN C++ 

PAULPEDRIANA 

101 B, Convention Center 

C++ is now sufficiently mature for game develop- 
ment, and high-performance C++ compilers are 
now readily available for a number of platforms. 
Yet many games are still written in C because 
game code needs to be "lean and mean," and 
C++ has a reputation as a language that gener- 
ates bloated code. This tutorial digs beneath the 
surface and examines C++ compilers in detail so 
you can get the advantages of C++ with none of 
the drawbacks. A number of C++ development 
issues are examined as well. You'll come away from 
this tutorial feeling confident to write just about 
any game with C++, and your game will likely be 
written and run faster than one developed in C. 



COMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




MARKETING & DISTRIBUTION 



CON FERENCE 



KEYNOTES 



1100 

THE GAME WITHIN THE GAME 



MONDAY, MAY 4 
104 C, Convention Center 



9:30-11:00 



This session reviews the launch of the PlayStation 
in North America and the challenges Sony faced 
entering an extremely competitive marketplace. The 
focus is on identifying the core user group and how 
building brand eguity with the "early adopters" 
was the key component to Sony's success. 

2400 

BEYOND THE HARDCORE GAMER 

DOUG GLEN 

TUESDAY, MAY 5 4:00-5:00 

104 C, Convention Center 

Please refer to the conference addendum for the 
description of this session. 

REACHING NEW MARKETS 

2102 

MARKET RESEARCH BOOT CAMP 

S0LANGEVANDERM0ER 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 
202 B, Convention Center 



9:30-11:00 



This workshop provides an overview of what types 
of market research exist and their uses in develop- 
ing and marketing interactive games. It is intended 
to get you thinking outside the box about your 
audience and competitors. The session includes: 
What research is available, what are the costs and 
how do you get it? What can you do yourself and 
how? How do you identify and factor in trends and 
fads? How do you use market research effectively 
to deliver what your audience wants, position your 
product, and formulate a marketing and distribu- 
tion plan that's truly in sync with your audience's 
characteristics? 



2301 

GOING GLOBAL IN THE GAMES 
BUSINESS 

DIANNE DR0SNES, DEREK MCLEISH 
& ALISON RICHARDS 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 

202 A, Convention Center 



2:00-3:30 



You think you just finished the best game since 
Doom. Your publisher tells you initial orders would 
be over 500,000 units, but.. .your game needs to 
be translated into 13 languages in less than one 
month, run under Win-J, you must change the color 
of blood to green in some markets, and by the way, 
your trademark will be changed in three major 
markets, so you'll need new splash screens! Is this 
any way to run a global business? Panelists 
approach global games business from five perspec- 
tives: market size and trends, technology issues, 
localization processes and costs, legal and market- 
ing issues, and finally distribution and finance. 
There has to be a reason well-managed publishers 
are doing more then 50% of their business outside 
the US. Find out why. 



BUILDING ON SUCCESS 



1201 

LEVERAGING REAL-TIME 3D IN 
YOUR MARKETING PLAN 

0MID RAHMAT 



MONDAY, MAY 4 
202 A, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



Real-time 3D games are not only a genre, but they 
have a specific demographic, and are in them- 
selves, a unique sales channel. This session 
explores and evaluates the ways in which a devel- 
oper can leverage real-time 3D content through 
hardware vendors and traditional and non-tradi- 
tional sales channels. 



2103 

LICENSING IN 

REILLY BRENNAN, GERMAINE GI0IA, 

JIM KENNEDY, & MARK RADCUFFE 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 
202 C, Convention Center 



9:30-11:00 



license can turn the average game into a mega-hit. 
Those same publishers can also tell you how they 
got burned on a big name license because the 
overall game was mediocre. The marriage between 
gameplay and the license a title carries must bene- 
fit and complement each other in order for the final 
product to be a success. Come find out what ingre- 
dients are necessary. 

2202 

HOW GAME SPIN-OFF 
N0VELIZATI0N DEALS WORK 

ASHLEY GRAYSON, CAROLYN GRAYSON, 
DAFYDD AB HUGH, & BRIAN LINAWEAVER 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 

202 B, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



This session is about the business of setting up a 
novelization deal. How do you tell if you have a 
novelizable game? How do you find an agent!? 
Who publishes game novelizations? What are the 
steps you must plan for? Learn the timetables for 
publishing a tie in. 

2204 

MANAGING INNOVATION IN 
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 
PROJECTS 

JOHN FOWLER 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 

203 A, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



In today's business environment it is difficult to 
maintain a high level of creativity. Most of a devel- 
opment team's time is spent solving problems, 
working in a closed environment or meeting tight 
deadlines. This leaves little time to share new ideas, 
think beyond the current project, or respond to 
feedback. This session looks at several of the latest 
trends in innovation and product development. 
Using best practice examples, this session looks at 
the role of cross-functional teams, knowledge shar- 
ing, feedback techniques, creating positive friction, 
and proven methods of creating derivative prod- 
ucts. The course is based on the most recent publi- 
cations and articles covering areas of innovation, 
organizational behavior and project management. 
Participants leave the seminar with new ideas, 
proven concepts to test and techniques they can 
put to work when they get back to their offices. 



f> 



Any major publisher can tell you that a big name 





2303 

LICENSING OUT 

KEN ABRAHMS, PAUL BALDWIN, REILLY 
BRENNAN, DANIEL KLETZKY & DANNY SIMON, 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 
202 C, Convention Center 



2:00-3:30 



The characters, worlds and settings that developers 
create do not have to be limited to just games. 
Plenty of properties have been expanded into a 
number of different mediums, including film, televi- 
sion, toy lines and books. Make the most out of 
your creations by licensing them out to new audi- 
ences. 



THE DISTRIBUTION GAME 

1202 

DISTRIBUTION OPTIONS FOR 
TODAY'S MARKET 

TOM FRISINA 



MONDAY, MAY 4 
202 B, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



This session describes the opportunities, options 
and pitfalls developers face in creating products for 
distribution by a second party. How should a devel- 
oper manage its expectations of publisher/distribu- 
tor performance? When is the time to draw the line 
on contract issues that appear to disfavor you? 
How do you focus on the best, long term interests 
of your company in choosing a distribution part- 
ner? Is this the right business to be in? 



1302 

DISTRIBUTION STANDARDS FOR 
THE GAME INDUSTRY 

SUSAN LEE-MERROW, MICHAEL MAAS 
& LAURA MEILE 



MONDAY, MAY 4 
202 B, Convention Center 



2:00-3:30 



This session discusses the pros and cons of some of 
the major issues surrounding the distribution and 
retail channel: net-to-zero pricing, minimum-adver- 
tised pricing (MAP), street dates, MDF spending 
levels, and more. Two distributors, one from the PC 
side and one from the console side, give their expe- 
riences and opinions, especially with regard to dif- 
ferences among the various channels. 



2101 

INCREASING YOUR COMPANY'S 
REVENUE: WILL IT COME FROM 
RETAIL, E COMMERCE, OR 
ALTERNATIVE DISTRIBUTION 
CHANNELS? 

JESSE ALLREAD, DAVID COLE, ELI ERHMAN 
& JOHN TAYLOR 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 
202 A, Convention Center 



9:30-11:00 



Retail, electronic commerce or alternative channel 
distribution? When do you expand to take advan- 
tage of a new marketplace? How do you get start- 
ed? What are the roadblocks and opportunities? 
Who is profitably participating in each of these 
segments? Shouid your product be developed for 
one or the other? Or both? What happened in 
1997 that you must know to compete in 1998? 



2203 

EDUCATING THE RETAILER 

JEFFTSCHILTSCH 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 
202 C, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



The continuing boom in interactive entertainment 
is both a blessing and a curse for retailers. Never 
before have so many quality titles been available 
for sale, but at the same time retailers must cope 
with a seasonal sales curve that resulted in nearly 
50% of all games being sold during the November- 
December holiday season. This lecture discusses in 
an open forum, how developers and publishers can 
educate retailers on effective marketing campaigns 
that distinguish titles during the peak sales 
months, and help develop the untapped sales 
potential of other key periods throughout the year. 



2302 

OEM & BUNDLING STRATEGIES 

JILL G0LDW0RN, MATT T0SCHL0G, KEN WIRT 
& PHILIP WRIGHT 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 
202 B, Convention Center 



2:00-3:30 



The session highlights the ins and outs of negotiat- 
ing a successful bundling transaction, from what's 
involved in a hardware company's product selec- 
tion decision to all the steps it takes to get to con- 
tract signature. The session explores the details 
inherent in the delivery of the title, including nego- 
tiation strategies, product development considera- 
tions as well as any potential impact on retail sales 
of the title. 



GAMES 60 ONLINE 

1203 

MARKETING AND BUILDING 
STRATEGIC ALLIANCES IN 
CYBERSPACE 

CHARLES AUSTIN 

MONDAY, MAY 4 11:30-12:30 

202 C, Convention Center 

Learn how to use the web as a marketing tool as 
part of a larger plan to develop strategic alliances 
in an increasingly crowded marketplace. 

1303 

ONLINE GAMING-MARKETING 
STRATEGIES 

KRISTIN ASLES0N, JEFF DWIGHT, SCOTT FASSER, 
ERIK LUNDBERG& RICH PEARSON 



MONDAY, MAY 4 
202 C, Convention Center 



2:00-3:30 



This session discusses the different aspects of mar- 
keting gaming online. This rapidly growing area is 
explored by a panel of the industry's leading repre- 
sentatives from the top content providers and pub- 
lishers. Unique insights are revealed regarding 
audience development and definition, revenue 
models, licensing, and content. This session also 
touches on infrastructure and the relationship with 
retail. This is a great learning opportunity for the 
marketing pro seeking to get involved with this 
ever-evolving and emerging market. 

1402 

HOW DO YOU BRING A GAME 
PROPERTY TO A MASS MARKET 
AUDIENCE ONLINE? 

ALLEN CUNNINGHAM 



MONDAY, MAY 4 
202 B, Convention Center 



4:00-5:00 



This discussion provides an overview of all pieces 
of the equation: content, game platforms, distribu- 
tion, marketing, and pricing models. 

2201 

HARNESS THE INTERNET TO 
SELL MORE GAMES 

BRIAN JAMISON 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 

202 A, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



Everyone knows the Internet is an excellent medi- 
um for reaching gamers. But what truly distinguish- 



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I0MPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




LU 

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LU 

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LU 
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es a site that enhances product sales from one that 
gathers virtual dust? How does a successful pro- 
motion translate into sales? What are the tricks of 
maximimzing revenue on the Internet? What 
advertising strategies work on the Net? This is a 
technobabble-free session delivered in standard 
English. No Internet experience required. 

—TOOLS FOR SURVIVAL— 

1301 

RAISING CAPITAL FOR YOUR 
NEXT PROJECT: UNIQUE 
FUNDING VEHICLES FOR GAME 
DEVELOPMENT, PLATFORM 
PORTS & DISTRIBUTION 

JESSE ALLREAD, DAVID BEYER, 
ERIK OH & CHANAN STEINHART 



MONDAY, MAY 4 
202 A, Convention Center 



2:00-3:30 



Your current project is coming to an end. Yes, 
you've got more to do until it's done, but you've 
got to get the next job in the door too! How do 
you stop this itch/scratch cycle? Wouldn't you be 
happier and more productive with alternatives to 
running out of money and mortgaging the next 



project to finish paying for this one? Panelists with 
real life examples of current deals providing money 
for game development, ports and distribution 
reveal the trail to the pot of gold. Please join the 
experts and participate in the funding of gaming. 
Want money? 



1401 

THE SHAPE OF '98 AND BEYOND 

ANN STEPHENS 



MONDAY, MAY 4 
202 A, Convention Center 



4:00-5:00 



1998 is proving to be a difficult year indeed in 
competing for consumer software dollars. Prices 
continue to drop, software firms continue to merge 
and morph into larger entities, retail chains exer- 
cise increasing clout, and the internet has not lived 
up to its early hype as an easy method for selling 
software. This session determines who is winning 
and who is losing in the current climate, and what 
strategies will likely emerge in the coming year. 



1403 

WORKING WITH DEVELOPERS 

KELLY FLOCK 

MONDAY, MAY 4 4:00-5:00 

202 C, Convention Center 

"Product shall be marketed in the sole discretion of 
the publisher." With this dreaded phrase, the enter- 
tainment software developer finds himself an 
unwilling spectator on the sidelines of the process 
which may determine the success or failure of his 
game in the market. This lecture presents the case 
for the publisher to retain sole approval over the 
game's marketing, and then the case for the devel- 
oper to stick his pimply out-of-joint nose into the 
process. It's the publisher's money versus the 
developer's art. Are the objectives of the publisher 
and developer mutually exclusive? Is the publisher 
a legitimate brand in the mind of the consumer, ala 
EA Sports? Or is the developer equally effective in 
selling games, ala Westwood or a Sid Meier? Why 
do publishers seemed threatened when asked to 
promote a developer? Did Bill lie about Monica? 
These questions and more in this fascinating lec- 
ture from one of the industry's most consistently 
hungover panelists. 



(New Writers Sought) 




If you're technically astute and have a way with words, 
Game Developer magazine needs you. We're looking 
for feature articles on graphics programming, testing 
and QA, producer/management issues, audio, art 
and animation, internet game development, new 
technologies, and game design. We're also looking 
for people to review game development tools. 

Please send your abstract or outline to: 
adunne@compuserve.com 



Writer's guidelines can be downloaded from our 
web site at: http://www.gdmag.com/writguid.htm 



Thanks, 




J^s 



Editor in Chief 



VjJ 



YOU* RE INVITED 




U^E^ 




JOIN US 



Game Developer magazine honors 
es that bring innovative technology 
advances to the lives of professional game 
developers. A team of 30 expert Judges 
scrutinized hundreds of hardware and software 
products to come up with the winning tools 
that make your jobs easier. And don't miss 
the reception after the awards ceremony! 



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MAll\«Ak«lSNM 



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Monday, May 4th, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 
Beacon Ballroom A, Hyatt Regency 
Long Beach, California 



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For more information: 
www.gdmag.com/awards.htm 



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MANAGING GAME DEVELOPMENT 




CON FERENCE 



MONDAY, MAY 4 & TUESDAY, MAY 5 10:30am - 6:30pm 



THE SOFTWARE GAME 
"Play more, learn more." 

PRESENTED BY MCCARTHY TEAMWORX 

The Software Game is literally a game that's played 
in The Managing Game Development Conference. 
It is intended for managers, developers, program 
and project managers or anyone who wants to cre- 
ate a team that produces Quantum results. The 
Software Game is designed by McCarthy 
TeamworX, a team of software developers and 
managers who teach software developers and 
managers. The Referees include software profes- 
sionals from various companies who graduated 
from McCarthy TeamworX BootCamp. The Software 
Game contains more learning, more levels, more 
traps, more bad guys, more challenges, more 
growth and more potential for significant personal 
achievement than any two-day investment you're 
likely to encounter anytime soon. 

These are but a few of the thrilling, mind- 
expanding opportunities presented to you: 

• Shatter the Reorg-Monster! Never see its ugly, 
evil face again! 

• Collect enough of the cleverly concealed 
Treasures of Motivation and Gems of Alignment 
to reach HyperTeam! 

• Gather the Power Pills in the Misty Cavern of 
Shared Vision and see your future clearly. 

• Make time slow down! Make resources multiply! 
All by applying the Magic of the Big Idea. 

• Conguer the Hideous Demons of Mediocrity. Zap 
them into personal genius assistants. 

• Team-up against the Hairy Beast of Lateness 
until your developing Quantum Team Power 
tames and enslaves him. 

• Ride the Lightning Bolt of intentional group cre- 
ativity! 

• Blow away the seemingly invulnerable and fear- 
some Conflict Traps with your personal 
Respectifier. 

• Discover whether the Black Hats are really 
friends or foe! 

SCHEDULE 

SPECIAL NOTES: 

1 . For maximal results, you must be willing to play 
by the rules: you are self-directed characters in 
a game with constrained behaviors. Rule viola- 
tions are refereed and hurt team score. 

2. You can always pass on any activity. 



SEAVIEW, HYATT 

3. If you come for one day, you are expected to 
come for two days or else your team is short- 
changed. 



DAY ONE 

MONDAY, MAY 4TH: 



10:30-11:30 



LECTURE AND DISCUSSION LED BY JIM MCCARTHY 

THE GAME OF SOFTWARE 

Why Play? 

How it Came to Be 

Theory of Gameplay 

Connection 

Inter-Personal Protocols 

Shared Vision 

11:30-11:45 

Coffee Break 

11:45-1:00 

Presentation, Distribution of Rule 

Book, By TeamworX Referees 

RULES OF THE GAME 

Protocols: 

Check in 

Decider 

Outlyer 

Aligner 

Visionometer 

Referees 

Scoring 

EXPERIENTAL STATE ANALYSIS I 

Break into Teams 

Battle the ReOrg Monster 

Gameplay 

Presence Intensifier 

Engage Alignment Engine 

1:00-2:00 

Team Lunch 



2:00-2:30 

SoftMode 

2:30-4:30 

Gameplay 
Alignment 
Black Hat Strategy 

4:30 - 5:00 

Coffee Break 

5:00 - 6:30 

Black Hat Encounter 
EXPERIENTAL STATE ANALYSIS 
Evening: Alignment Package 
Completion 

— day TWO — 

TUESDAY, MAY 5TH: 
10:30 - 10:45 

Pre-Game Show 

10:45-11:15 

Alignment Checkin 

11:15-11:30 

Coffee Break 

11:30-1:00 

Visionometer 

1:00 -2:00 LUNCH 
2:00-2:30 

Soft Mode 

EXPERIENTAL STATE ANALYSIS 

2:30-4:30 

Product Development 

4:30-5:00 

Coffee Break 

5:00 - 7:00- 

SHIP 

Team Closure/ Celebration 

Experiential State Analysis 






ANALYST BRIEFING 



MONDAY, MAY 4, 9:30am -5:00pm 



The number of platform and distribution options 
facing game developers is increasing, partly driven 
by online technologies, and partly by the advent of 
new multimedia technologies. At the same time, 
the cost of producing hit titles is outstripping the 
return on investment. Investing in game develop- 
ment, and making the right decisions to ensure 
your titles have a shot at a responsive audience 
has never been more difficult. Some of the indus- 
try's leading analysts take a close look at the facts 
and market numbers and answers the needs of the 
modern game developer and publisher. 

9:30 - 10:15 

The View From Wall Street 

Robert Fagin, Equity Analsyt from CIBC 
Oppenheimer, talks about the state of the game 
industry and how its players are shaping up in this 
highly competitive industry. Robert gives a take on 
the "Wall Street" environment for both public 
game companies and what it's like for private com- 
panies in the field to raise money. He also explores 
the mergers and acquisition activity in the market, 
and the multiples that companies are being bought 
for. There is also discussion of the general market 
environment and the performance of the stocks of 
game companies 

10:15-11:00 

The 3D Market 

Dr. Jon Peddie of Jon Peddie Associates has been 
tracking the PC graphics market since the 1984. 
His company publishes the industry bible, The 
Peddie Report, every week and Jon has spoken on 
the explosion in 3D graphics on numerous occa- 
sions. This session analyzes companies that are 
making 3D graphics hardware and software tech- 
nologies that drive the market, and predicts where 
the best opportunities are going to be for savvy 
game developers and publishers. The 3D graphics 
accelerator market on the PC has created a new 
avenue by which game titles can reach an enthusi- 
astic, high-spending, and very demanding game 
playing audience. Whoever taps into this market is 
reaching mature game players with the best sys- 
tems, who are most thristy for cutting edge games. 

11:30-12:15 

What's Hot in the Channel 

Ann Stephens is president of PC Data, the pre-emi- 
nent tabulator of hardware and software sales in 
the United States. PC Data's numbers are routinely 
printed in more than 600 publications worldwide, 



BEACON B, HYATT 

and nearly 1,000 software firms subscribe it its 
software-tracking service. PC Data recently 
expanded its focus to include the tracking of video 
game sales. This session takes a look at the state 
of the retail market for game software and hard- 
ware. PC Data has a finger on the pulse of all 
game channels, and Anne targets what's hot in the 
sales channel today and tomorrow. 

12:15-1:00 

Beyond Online Gaming: Future Trends 
in Digital Media Devices 

Noted journalist, author, and industry pundit, Rob 
Glidden, gives a tour of new gaming frontiers. 
Imagine a future where digital broadcast entertain- 
ment, and next generation digital consoles that 
decode ATSC and have 3D game functionality rule 
the computer game developer roost. This session 
analyzes the impact of a future beyond traditional 
Internet gaming. Rob is acknowledged as an 
expert in the field of digital media, and is aware of 
how computer and traditional media companies 
have come to a watershed in their merging inter- 
ests. This watershed is digital entertainment and 
game developers are ideally positioned to reap the 
rewards of wonderful advances in digital media 
processing technologies. Don't get left behind, and 
don't get sidetracked by talk of convergence. This 
is the real thing. 

2:00 - 2:45 

The State of U.S. Interactive 
Entertainment Industry 

Ed Roth, president of NPD's Leisure Activities 
Group talks about the current state of the interac- 
tive entertainment industry in the United States. 
Ed provides attendees with updated information 
about market dynamics including, market size, 
major publishers/manufacturers, platform winners 
and losers, and current/predictive trends for the 



THE CGDC'S 

ANALYST BRIEFING IS 

SPONSORED BY 
DOODAH MARKETING 



future. This session looks at the business for both 
the console and PC segments. Over 85% of the 
interactive entertainment industry subscribes to 
NPD's services. The NPD Group is one of the top 
ten marketing research companies in the U.S. track- 
ing a wide variety of industries including computer 
hardware/peripherals, computer software, web 
usage (PC Meter), videogames, and toys. 

2:45 - 3:30 

The Retail Channels - Opportunities 
Abound 

David Cole, principal of DFC Intelligence, collects, 
sifts through, and analyzes more data on the 
games industry in one year than most people come 
across in a lifetime. Learn how video, book and 
music channels are impacting the game retail 
channels. Find out what the role of market devel- 
opment funds. What is the importance of point of 
purchase displays and how do you reach the con- 
sumer at the retail point of purchase? This session 
presents the business arguments, the market statis- 
tics, and the analyst's eye for the future. After all, 
it's all about making that sale at the end of the 
day. 

4:00 - 4:45 

Online Markets - Opportunity or 
Threat 

Bill Zinsmeister of IDC Research lays out the facts 
on the online games market. For many developers, 
online gaming represents both a great opportunity, 
and a possible minefield of expenses, issues, and 
conflicts. Bill has written many reports for IDC, one 
of the world's foremost market research orgnaiza- 
tions, on trends and market forces in the online 
games market. Bill provides insight into the online 
games markets through a combination of methods 
including looking at the total electronic commerce 
market, home PC penetration, online service pene- 
tration and revenue projections, and residential 
broadband technologies. The scope of this 
research presents a comprehensive, all encompass- 
ing view of the online games market past, present, 
and future. 

4:45 - 5:00 

Closing Address 

Omid Rahmat wraps up the day's events, and puts 
together the big picture perspective. 



r 1 



0MPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 





When's the last time you performed a 





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If you're part of a team that 
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CLASSIC CONFERENCE 



SESSIONS 



— AUDIO - 

KEYNOTE 




MAYASA MATSUURA 

THE GENESIS OF PARAPPATHE RAPPER 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 3:30-4:30 

The genesis of PaRappa The Rappa cannot just be 
described as a game of musical breakthrough. 
PaRappa's charismatic style broke the boundaries of 
computer games. It features an exclusive style people 
have never encountered, yet find somewhat appealing. 
It is something like taking a bite of an ordinary sand- 
wich then being struck with astonishment because of 
its great taste. At first glance, you see only sliced toma- 
toes in the sandwich, then a taco tempura and some 
lettuce, and finally you see the soy sauce all over the 
bread. A dish Masaya Matsuura created with random 
ideas became something more than he expected. 
PaRappa is an experiment turned into a gourmet dish. 
However, the gourmet dish leading to a mega-hit 
game wasn't simply the result of the tomato slice you 
saw in the sandwich, nor was it simply the result of 
the West meets East concept. PaRappa The Rapper 
was a long journey of adventure and hard work in 
breaking the norms of today's society. Join Masaya as 
he recounts his journey. 

"For me, a computer is a synthesizer of the 2 1st century. " 
Mayasa Matsuura was born in June 1961 in Osaka, Japan. When 
he was nineteen, his encounter with the Apple II and the 
Kaleidoscope software changed his life. While staring at the 
Kaleidoscope, Masaya felt something was missing. He decided to 
put music to the images he was seeing on the screen. That was 



BALLROOM A, CONVENTION CENTER 

his very first step into the world of computer entertainment. 
Masaya 's fundamental tenent as a designer is to ultilize a com- 
puter to integrate music and computer graphics to create new 
and different digital entertainment. With the computer as his 
tool, he can manage and manipulate every bit of his imagination. 
In April 1983, Masaya formed the band PYS»S (pronounced 
"size") with female vocalist Chaka. The band debuted in 1985 
with the album Different View. Their critically acclaimed music 
fully utilized the computer, however the state-of-the-art in digital 
media and environments still didn 't satisfy Masaya. After more 
trial and error PYS»S disbanded in 1996 after the release of their 
tenth album Two Bridges. 

In Decemeber 1996, PaRappa The Rapper was released for the 
PlayStation. Masaya had fulfilled his dream of making nteractive 
entertainment with a spec that met his demands. PaRappa The 
Rapper was a game that went beyond ordinary games and took 
Japan by storm. It appealed to a lot of young women who were 
not famaliar to videogames and as a result, sold in record num- 
bers. PaRappa won the 1996 CECA Award, Japan Software 
Award and Japan Game of the Year 97 which was voted on by 
readers of 18 domestic game magazines. 



COM 



I GAME DEVELOPER 



OMPOTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFER 






Lecture 4522 

A REVIEW OF DIRECTMUSIC 

KEITH WEINER 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

102 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



5:00-6:00 



Microsoft is in the process of releasing DirectMusic. 
DirectMusic provides new operating system compo- 
nents aimed at improving the performance of MIDI 
on the Windows platform. It is designed as an open 
and extensible standard which allows interactive 
music components from hardware synthesizers to 
algorithmic melody generators manufactured by dif- 
ferent companies to operate seamlessly together . 
DirectMusic includes the long awaited 
Downloadable Sounds (DLS) API, a standardized DLS 
software synthesizer, with better timing services, 
inter-application communication protocols, a unigue 
method of creating real time interactive music and 
flexible authoring tools. If it delivers on all of it's 
promise, DirectMusic should provide the infrastruc- 
ture and technology required to really open to doors 
to high quality and highly interactive MIDI music on 
the Window's platform. Well, after all of the hype, 
how did they really do? Come to this IA-SIG spon- 
sored review and find out. 



Lecture 4403 

ADVANCED AUDIO TECHNOLOGY 
FOR THE PC: THEORY AND 
PRACTICE 

JEFFREY BARISH & DAVID O'NEAL 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

101 A, Convention Center 

ADVANCED 



3:30-4:30 



There have been several important advances in the 
technology for audio and music synthesis in multi- 
media platforms. This session discusses the technical 
nature of these advances and also explains how 
they can be applied in practice. Wavetable synthesiz- 
ers have replaced the FM synthesizers beatified by 
the SoundBlaster card, and wavetable synthesizers 
have been enhanced with support for downloadable 
sounds and 64-voice polyphony. The Windows oper- 
ating system supports three APIs for music and 
audio in games: DirectSound, DirectSound3D, and 
DirectMusic. The system hardware supports higher 
quality through AC97 and higher performance 
through MMX. This new technology enables new 
capabilities. This session illustrates these capabilities 
by describing how they could be used to create the 
sound for a specific scene from an imaginary game. 
Also discussed are possible new applications for 
sound in telegaming, remote sound audition and 
purchasing, and net-delivered audio content. 



Roundtable 3210/4508/5409 

DESIGNING GAMES TO USE 3D 
AUDIO 

BRIAN SCHMIDT 

11:30-12:30 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Shoreline A, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Seaview A, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency C, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



5:00-6:00 



3:30-4:30 



3D audio has finally made into the multimedia main- 
stream. DirectSound3D accelerators shipped in 
quantity from multiple manufacturers for the last 
Christmas season, making the market ripe for titles 
to take advantage of the new 3D audio hardware. 
This roundtable discussion focuses on how 3D audio 
can be best incorporated into game and multimedia 
titles, and how to take advantage of the new gener- 
ation of 3D audio accelerators now in the hands of 
consumers. Topics range from how to best use 
DS3D, what virtual speaker technology is for DVD, 
how to create great 3D audio content as well as 
many other topics. 

Prerequisites: Knowledge of DirectSound helpful. 



Sponsored by 

Microsoft 

DIRECTMUSIC 

TRUDY CULBRETH 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
201 A, Convention Center 

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE 



3350 



2:00-3:00 



DirectMusic, Microsoft's newest DirectX foundation 
technology, changes the way people think about 
music in games. Using this comprehensive technolo- 
gy, developers can deliver dynamic musical accom- 
paniment and software wavetable synthesis in a sin- 
gle technology. Musicians can provide custom instru- 
ments and sound effects via DLS (downloadable 
samples). Create original, ever changing musical 
accompaniment for your game. Perform musical 
embellishments in response to user interaction. 
Discover how this exciting new technology revolu- 
tionizes the music that your game delivers. 



Lecture 3223 

DIRECTMUSIC & 
DOWNLOADABLE SOUNDS: 
FINALLY, COMPLETE CONTROL 
OVER YOUR SOUND DESIGN! 

T0D0R FAY, DAVID JAVEL0SA, JOHN MILES 
NICK SKREPET0S, DAVID SPARKS 



DAVID TAYLOR & TOM WHITE 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
101 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



First, attendees depart this session understanding 
that DirectMusic and Downloadable Sounds (DLS) 
provides in Windows 98 a capable, scaleable, and 
broadly-deployed music creation environment for 
Christmas '98 titles. Secondly attendees understand 
that good tools exist today for building compatible 
DirectMusic and DLS sound banks for those 
Christmas '98 titles. Thirdly, hardware acceleration 
techniques exist so that consumers receive a no- 
compromises experience. Lastly, architecture 
advances in 1999 with useful enhancements 
endorsed by the MIDI Manufacturers Association 
and Interactive Audio Special Interest Group. 

Prerequisites: The audience should have experience 
composing sound tracks for PC titles, have a good 
understanding of MIDI, and have an interest in 
sound design. 



Sponsored by 5550 

Intel 

DIRECTSOUND RETAINED MODE 
(DSRM) 

MARK LEAVY 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

201 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



5:00-6:00 



This presentation outlines the architecture and use 
of a new set of interfaces to DirectSound. These high 
level "retained mode" interfaces greatly simplifies 
the programming complexity for applications that 
use sound. In addition to the basics, such as auto- 
matic file and URL reading, this session outlines the 
intrinsic support for high quality mixing, multiple 
audio effects and high quality 3D localization and 
environmental acoustics. The retained mode inter- 
faces greatly improve the performance and quality of 
sound composition on the PC platform while simpli- 
fying the usage model and maintaining compatibility 
with all current DirectSound HW. 



Sponsored by 
Creative Labs 

ENVIRONMENTAL AUDIO 

DAVID R0SSUM 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
202 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



Today's 3D audio allows the game designer to place 
and move sources of sound at relative angles with 
respect to the player. What is missing, however, is 








sense of surroundings. Environmental audio 
ids the 3D programming interface by allowing 
iesigner to specify in detail an environment in 
h sound producing objects are manipulated. The 
id is then modeled within the environment, pro- 
ig audible reflections and reverberations. The 
t is a truly "live" sound experience. The 3D 
a model thus produced can be experienced with 
le stereo speakers or headphones. But the envi- 
lental audio model can be rendered even more 
rately using multiple speakers. This widens the 
?et spot," bringing additional realism, while still 
i/ing designers to work within the same API. 



lire 4304 

ME MUSIC DEMO MARATHON 

RGE SANGER 



RSDAY, MAY 7 
ncy A, Hyatt 



2:00-3:00 



audience has been seated. The lights are dim. 
: at Man introduces himself. The rest of the lec- 
consists of music from people who write for 
es. It is an hour-long deluge of 30-second to 5- 
ite samples of music from various independent 
c company. The opportunity to get this kind of 
Dective on game music does not exist elsewhere. 



nsored by 4153/5252 

fING GAMERS AURAL 
HSFACTI0N 

1 MCILVAINE 



RSDAY, MAY 7 
C, Convention Center 

)AY, MAY 8 

3, Convention Center 



10:00-11 :00 



11:30-12:30 



RMEDIATE 

aresent generation of games is approaching a 
;au in 3D visual realism. The next big advance is 
ihanced audio-techniques, and specifically the 
jf 3D positional audio. The widespread availabil- 
f high-performance 3D audio hardware, along 
simple and standardized APIs, has brought this 
nology into the hands of developers. Many of 
nanufacturers responsible for the boom in 3D 
hies have turned their attention to positional- 
o acceleration. With the DirectSound3D API 
»r DirectX5, Microsoft has made 3D audio viable 
'ogrammers in the same way Direct3D did for 
hies. Poor use of audio is detrimental to the 
sm of a game, and more so with positional-3D. 
i care, 3D sounds can enhance game play and 
ersiveness. This session describes how to avoid 
ntial pitfalls, and how best to take advantage of 
meed features such as resource management, 
ctions, occlusions, and other environmental 



effects, for maximum effect. 

Prerequisite: An understanding of DirectX (specifi- 
cally DirectSound and DirectSound3D) would be 
helpful, but is not necessary. 



Lecture 5204 

HEARING THE WORLD THROUGH 
A SNORKEL: AUDIO FOR ONLINE 
GAMES 

BRAD DERRICK 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

102 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



Producing audio for online games presents unique 
challenges for sound and music design. Producers 
accustomed to filling up half of a CD-ROM with 
Redbook-quality digital audio quickly find them- 
selves limited to a few megabytes of space allotted 
for sound when working in this medium. A common 
solution is to reduce the overall amount of audio, 
use MIDI versions of music, and sacrifice texture and 
background ambiance. The Kesmai Audio Group 
takes a new approach to sound design for the online 
environment, one that maintains the depth and rich- 
ness of a product without eating up bandwidth and 
users' hard disk space. This presentation focuses on 
the artistic and technical problems and their solu- 
tions encountered during the production several 
products, including Aliens Online. There are technical 
demonstrations and a question and answer period. 



Lecture 4104 

"HOLY FOLEY, BATMAN!" 

HAMILTON ALTSTATT 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

102 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEIATE 



10:00-11:00 



Tired of hearing those same ol' re-hashed sound 
effects from the same ol' re-hashed sound libraries 
over and over in games throughout the years? Well, 
break out that mic and dust off the tape deck, it's 
time to take a trip back to the forgotten era of Foley 
and prop recording. Give your interactive title a 
unique and distinctive flair by recording original 
sound sources from scratch, often with common 
household objects. Utilize the time proven tech- 
niques pioneered by the masters like Jim McDonald, 
Greg Watson, and of course Pat Foley. In this high 
tech era of digital processors, samplers, and editors, 
it's a refreshing change to hear a game get back to 
the basics with the unsterilized, rough-'round-the- 
edges but truly characteristic feel that only live 
recording can achieve. 



Lecture 3404 

ILLUSIONS WITH AUDIO AND 
AUDIO STORYTELLING: A 
PRODUCER'S AND GAME 
DEVELOPER'S GUIDE TO BETTER 
AND MORE EFFICIENT 
SOUNDTRACKS 

SCOn MARTIN GERSHIN 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

101 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



The goal of this session is to better inform the devel- 
opers of interactive entertainment of the potentials 
audio can bring to their product. The lecture looks at 
other mediums that utilize audio and compare how 
they are similar and different to gaming. A future 
look at technology in the music, television, film and 
industrial markets and how this might relate to the 
industry is dicussed. Also explored is how we can 
better tell our stories and create our illusions by hav- 
ing an understanding "based in reality" of what's 
possible and what's not and most important what's 
considered a priority. Cost issues are discussed, as 
well as budgets and how most games don't get 
their bang for their buck, mismanagement, cost over 
runs because of unclear or unrealisitic schedules. 
Listen to the 20 commandments for keeping the 
audio portion of a project creative and on budget, 
letting the soundtrack be all that it can be. 



Seminar 3104 

IMPLEMENTING AN INTERACTIVE 
MUSIC SCORE 



DAVE O'NEAL & DON VECA 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
101 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11 :00 



A music soundtrack manipulates a movie goer's 
emotions for a more effective storytelling experience. 
Computer games tell an interactive story and thus 
can benefit from an interactive music score. The suc- 
cess of creating an interactive musical environment 
relies heavily on the method in which the game con- 
trols the music. This session takes a top down 
approach, evaluating what it takes for a game to 
give useful commands to an interactive music mod- 
ule and how that module could respond to these 
commands. This session discusses the concepts that 
need to be communicated amongst the game 
designers, software developers, and music com- 
posers. The last 40 minutes of this session is an open 
discussion format. 




;«.«« 



IMPUIER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 



V 





Lecture 4204 

IMPROVING THE STANDARD OF 
PC AUDIO 

MARK IMADESKI 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Regency A, Hyatt 



11:30-12:30 



While it is clear how powerful audio can be in 
enhancing the consumer's experience with technical 
media, this experience of great high quality audio has 
not filtered into the consumer PC market. There is def- 
initely a need to have a quality PC audio solution, but 
the desire has not been present in the marketplace. 
This is primarily due to the resistance of abandoning 
the old standards. Until an advanced audio platform 
can be created and supplied at a reasonable price 
point, along with audio content to take advantage of 
this hardware, the goal of high quality PC audio is 
likely to remain unfulfilled for the typical consumer. 
The Interactive Audio Special Interest Group (IASIG) of 
the MIDI Manufacturer's Association (MMA) is work- 
ing towards making this goal a reality through ongo- 
ing discussions and the efforts of it's working groups. 



Foley" door and a racecar engine that sounds like it 
should instead of like a vacuum cleaner. 



Lecture 3304 

MAKING INTERACTIVE MUSIC 
WORK: GEXII 

JIM HEDGES 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

101 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



Gex II for the Sony PlayStation features interactive 
music in nearly all levels programmed using the inter- 
active music driver developed at Crystal Dynamics. In 
addition, the musical styles vary greatly throughout 
the game in order to keep pace with it's changing 
environments. This session explains the capabilities of 
the interactive music driver, along with the implemen- 
tation and programming of the music in the game. 
Examples from the game are provided, both music 
and code. Also discussed are the logistics of coordi- 
nating interactive audio in a project such as this 
which includes different composers and programmers. 



Lecture 5421 

NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 
FOR INTERACTIVE AUDIO 
PRODUCERS AND COMPOSERS 

SPENCER CRITCHLEY, RON KNIGHT, MARK 
MILLER & DAVID ZABRISKIE 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

102 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-5:30 



As the number of PC and console titles being pro- 
duced continues to drop, many interactive audio 
producers and composers are wondering if other 
opportunities exist in which their particular (or 
should we say peculiar?) skills sets would have 
value. The answer to this query may be closer at 
hand than they think. This session explores the art 
and business of sound design for products from the 
coin-op, casino, and location-based entertainment 
industries and talks about the technical challenges 
and potential business opportunities for interactive 
audio producer and composers that exist beyond the 
PC and set top box. Come and listen, then go home 
and update your web site and your marketing mate- 
rials. 



3154 



Sponsored by 
Staccato Systems Inc. 

INTERACTIVE AUDIO AND 
"VIRTUAL FOLEY" SOUND 
EFFECTS USING PHYSICALLY 
MODELED ALGORITHMS 

PAT SCANDAUS& SCOTT VAN DUYNE 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 10:00-11:00 

202 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

Let's face it, the gamer's audio experience, and the 
title developer's audio tools have just not kept pace 
with the video. Direct X, Wave Table synthesis, and 
DLS do not solve this problem. It requires an entirely 
new approach. Staccato Systems presents a new 
audio technology known asSynthScript Down 
Loadable Algorithms (SynthScript DLA). 
SynthScriptDLA, when coupled with XG (Yamaha's 
extended General MIDI), Down Loadable Sounds 
(DLS), and Software 3-D, offers to bring a highly 
interactive and cost effective audio experience to the 
next generation of games. In addition SynthScript 
DLA uses a set of powerful patented physical model- 
ing technologies, developed by Stanford University 
and Yamaha, known as Sondius-XGO. Staccato also 
demonstrates SynthBuilder, a powerful CAD like tool 
for building physically modeled algorithms, and 
SynthCore the host based physically modeled sound 
synthesis engine. SynthBuilder automatically gener- 
ates the DSP like algorithms that drive SynthCore. 
The resulting parametric algorithms are extremely 
realistic and highly interactive. Several examples are 
demonstrated including an interactive "Virtual 



Lecture 3204 

MUSICAL COMPUTERS 

JOSH GABRIEL, GARY LEVENBERG 
& MARK MILLER 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 11:30-12:30 

Regency A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 

Imagine the computer as a musical instrument 
empowering individuals with or without musical 
skills to participate in making music. Imagine a 
game where the making of music is the primary 
game mechanic. Imagine albums that play on your 
stereo system while you jam along on your comput- 
er. Imagine creating virtual bands and jamming with 
friends over the internet. Well you don't need to 
"imagine" much at all. This is, in fact, a rapidly 
developing segment of the current interactive enter- 
tainment market. PaRappa the Rapper has proven 
that a musical game can be a success. MC 
Hammer's new album includes a remix that you can 
perform on your computer. A number of new and 
established companies are creating products aimed 
at non-musicians, music enthusiasts, and amateur 
musicians enabling them to use their computers to 
create music. Developers looking for a new niche, 
applications developers who can focus on the con- 
sumer, musicians, audio content owners. 



Lecture 5419 

PRODUCING AUDIO FOR RIVEN: A 
CASE STUDY 

MARTIN 0'DONNELL 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

101 B, Convention Center 



3:30-4:30 



This session is a behind the scenes look at the devel- 
opment of audio for the biggest selling game of 
1997. This session demonstrates how the audio con- 
tent of Riven was created, focusing on the foley, 
sound design, voice sweetening, ADR, ambient 
sound, and final mixing of all cut scenes. This case 
study highlights many of the interactive audio areas 
of the game that needed sound design, and ambient 
background sound. The software tools and tech- 
niques that were used are shown, along with 
movies, animations and still images. A progression 
from early prototype development with scratch 
audio, through to the final shipped product is 
demonstrated. There might also be a bonus look at 
the creation of audio for Myth: the Fallen Lords. 








Roundtable 3110/4109/5209 

PROGRAMMERS AND SOUND 
DESIGNERS: WHY CAN'T WE 
ALLJUST GET ALONG? 

BRIAN SCHMIDT 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 10:00-11 :00 

Seaview A, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 10:00-11:00 

Seaview A, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 11:30-12:30 

Seaview A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 

With so much attention focused on graphics and art, 
the sound designer sometimes feels almost forgotten. 
As a result, sound often appears to be left until the 
last minute, often seeming almost an afterthought to 
the game.This can result in. ..urn. .friction between the 
game programmers and the sound designers, with the 
producers caught right in the middle. This roundtable 
is a frank and open discussion amongst programmers, 
producers and creators of audio content for games. 
The goal is to share experiences, good and bad, 
between programmers and sound designers. Partici- 
pants are encouraged to use these shared experiences 
to explore ways to make the process of integrating 
audio into game content easier for all involved, result- 
ing in a better product. 



Sponsored by 4452 

QSound Labs 

QMDX:QS0UND'SFREE3D 
AUDIO SDK 

QSOUND LABS 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 3:30-4:30 

202 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

3D audio too hard? Hardware hassles, low-level cod- 
ing, proprietary API's, separate libraries for systems 
with/without acceleration? Yuck! Enter QSound Labs' 
QMDX, a new, free problem-solving SDK for Direct- 
Sound/DirectSound3D audio development. QMDX is 
manna for audio programmers, but everyone will 
appreciate how it streamlines production. Spend more 
time developing sophisticated content and less 
wrestling with low-level programming and hardware 
support challenges.. .for free! QMDX provides a high- 
level, feature-rich API with built-in features you won't 
find in DirectSound or elsewhere, yet it uses pure 
DirectSound "under the hood" to talk to hardware. 
QMDX optimizes hardware acceleration irrespective 
of manufacturer. On non-accelerated systems, 3D data 
is translated to a high-quality, high-efficiency stereo 
mix. The result is high frame rates with no extra work. 
With QMDX, there's no excuse not to use 3D audio.. 

This session is intended for audio programmers, but 
also of interest to game sound designers and pro- 



ducers. Knowledge of Direct Sound and DS3D would 
be useful but not required. 



Seminar 

SOUNDS LIKE CHICKEN: PC 
GAME AUDIO TECHNICAL 
QUALITY 

TOM HAYS 



5104 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

103 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



This session discusses the reasons for the gap in 
technical quality between audio in games and other 
media such as film and music industry CDs. Also 
explored are ways this gap is being closed, and the 
tradeoffs involved. 



Lecture 

3D AUDI0 101 

CONRAD MAXWELL 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

101 A, Convention Center 



5320 



2:00-3:00 



What is 3D audio language? Come see an overview of 
the language primer covering the basics of how 3D 
works. How do you evaluate 3D audio products? 
Explore the software test tools developed by the IA- 
SIG for 3D audio evaluation. Further discussion 
involves the basics of how to properly test 3D audio. 
Find out the baseline requirement for 3D audio and 
see an overview of the specifications. Demos from the 
leading companies are used to show key points. 



Roundtable 3310/4208/5509 

TIPS AND TECHNIQUES FOR 
EFFECTIVE SOUND DESIGN 

JAMES ACKLEY 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 2:00-3:00 

Seaview A, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 11:30-12:30 

Pacific, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 5:00-6:00 

Seaview A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 

This roundtable for sound designers shares tech- 
niques for creating effective soundscapes in interac- 
tive audio applications. This session discusses tools 
and the importance of communication between the 
artist, sound designer and game programmer. 
Methods of recording original sounds, ways of com- 
bining and manipulating them to create a convinc- 
ing and compelling game atmosphere are also 



shared. This is a great chance for industry sound 
designers to share knowledge with the interactive 
audio community as well as to pick up some new 
tips and techniques. 



Roundtable 4420/5121/5319 

VOICE OVER AND LOCALIZATION 

BILL BUCK & CHARLES DEVRIES 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 3:30-4:30 

Regency E, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 10:00-11:00 

Regency E, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 2:00-3:00 

Regency E, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 

This voice over and localization roundtable discusion 
features a lively debate on the following topics: Why 
some game deigners use professional actors, and 
why others don't? How important is it? Are game 
designers qualified to direct actors? What are the 
diferences between using union or non-union tal- 
ent? Is voice localization done better in Hollywood? 
What are the particulars of sound design vs. visual 
design? 



Sponsored by 3453/5152 

Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation 

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF 
INTERACTIVE MULTICHANNEL 
AUDIO ON DVD-ROM? 

JOHN LOOSE 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 3:30-4:30 

202 A, Convention Center 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 10:00-11:00 

202 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

Following in the footsteps of the over 100 interac- 
tive games produced in Dolby Surround, Dolby 
Digital is the next generation audio technology for 
computers. DVD-ROM is here today, and developers 
have only begun to scratch the surface of the poten- 
tial for the stunning realism of true, multichannel 
audio in games. The multichannel DVD-ROM audio 
of today is for linear content only, but Dolby would 
like to help developers and the PC audio community 
to merge multichannel Dolby Digital with interactive 
audio in the near future. Dolby wants to work with 
the game community to merge 5.1 channel sound- 
tracks with all the interactive audio used in cutting- 
edge games. Come hear about the latest develop- 
ments in Dolby Surround and Dolby Digital, and add 
your input to the future of DVD-ROM audio. 

Intended for those with basic familiarity of multi- 
channel audio and DVD. 




Computer gam 



0MPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFER 



V 




CLASSIC CONFERENCE 




SESSIONS 



BUSINESS AND LEGAL 

KEYNOTE 




PAUL SAMS 

CONTROL YOUR DESTINY: PUTTING THE 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 2:00-3:00 

Finding business solutions that support a developer's 
vision for a game is not only challenging, but also crit- 
ical to a company's long-term success. As the game 
industry matures, developers will have to fight harder 
and smarter to retain control over their titles and their 
future. By identifying and staying true to a set of core 
development philosophies, Blizzard Entertainment 
transitioned from third-party developer to publisher 
and released three of the best-selling games in recent 
years and launched the world's largest online game 
service. Many of the company's achievements are tied 
to strategic decision making that not only delivered 
capital, distribution and marketing muscle, but also 
provided the development autonomy necessary for 
making not just good games, but great games. 

Paul W. Sams serves as director of business development for 
Blizzard Entertainment, a division of Cendant Software, a sub- 
sidiary of Cendant Corporation. Paul is responsible for the over- 
all management of business operations, which includes licensing 
and online business development. In his position, Paul directs 
corporate strategy to maximize licensing opportunities for 



GAME FIRST IN DECISION MAKING 
104 A, CONVENTION CENTER 

Blizzard properties including Warcraft, Diablo and Starcraft. 
Additionally, he is responsible for managing the growth of 
Battle.net, the company's Internet gaming site. Since launching 
in January 1997, Battle.net has become the largest online gam- 
ing service in the world. 

Paul joined Blizzard in 1996 after three years at Davidson & 
Associates, Inc., an educational software division of Cendant 
Software. While at Davidson & Associates, Inc., Paul served as 
general manager of the joint venture between Davidson & 
Associates, Inc. and Simon & Schuster. He oversaw all business 
activities for the joint venture including product development, 
marketing and finance. Under his direction, the joint venture 
released several popular software titles including Typing Tutor 7, 
Maurice Ashley Teaches Chess and Extreme Chess. Paul began 
his career with Davidson & Associates, Inc. as contract manager 
in the legal department. Prior to joining Davidson & Associates, 
Inc., Paul worked for Intellimation, a publisher of discipline-spe- 
cific educational software. 



^) 





Lecture 3410/4209/5210 

BABES IN BOYLAND: EXPLODING 
MYTHS ABOUT WOMEN IN THE 
GAME INDUSTRY 

MELISSA FARMER 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Seaview A, Hyatt 


3:30-4:30 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Seaview B, Hyatt 


11:30-12:30 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Seaview B, Hyatt 


11:30-12:30 



This session is a frank discussion about the difficul- 
ties faced in the past and present by female game 
developers. Common misrepresentations and myths 
such as "women don't play games," and "women 
make lousy programmers," are discussed, along with 
a review of the status of women in the game indus- 
try today. 



Lecture 5501 

BENCHMARKETING 

ANDY FISCHER 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 5:00-6:00 

104 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

Benchmarks are a hot button for hardware vendors, 
a panacea for reviewers, and a safe haven for con- 
sumers. They can also be a strategic marketing 
opportunity for developers. Application-based 
benchmarks are the only unassailable tools by which 
performance can be judged. This session explores 
both the psychology of benchmarking and the merits 
of casting your real-time application as a bench- 
mark. Creating a benchmark can be a wonderful 
guerrilla marketing opportunity, an effective way to 
win both friends and enemies, and a sure-fire 
method to get the attention of hardware developers. 



Lecture 5219 

BEYOND GAMES: HOW THE REST 
OF THE BUSINESS WORKS 

KIMBERLEE B0GEN & SUSAN LEE-MERR0W 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

103 A, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 



11:30-12:30 



This session is, in short, marketing and sales 101 for 
the game developer. If you are staring your own 
company, at what point in the cycle you need to get 
serious? What are the differences among sole pro- 
prietorships, partnerships, corporations, limited liabil- 
ity companies and why the hell you should care? 



What about those buy-sell agreements? Who owns 
what? Business plans and lawyers, do you need 
them? What are the finances of marketing? Have 
you considered the cost of the sale, channel issues 
(MDF/coop), break even analyses, and ROI consider- 
ations?Hear some answers to the "If they had just 
put some marketing behind my product, it would 
have sold better," statement. 

Intended for developers who are thinking about 
starting their own companies. 



Lecture 5401 

BUSINESS AND LEGAL 
ESSENTIALS FOR BUILDING 
YOUR COMPANY: AVOIDING 
DISASTER AND POSITIONING FOR 
SUCCESS 

BRUCE MAXIM0V 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



This session assists game developers in understand- 
ing, and prepares them to address, the critical busi- 
ness and legal issues that can determine whether a 
company succeeds or fails. It provides practical guid- 
ance on the questions arising at each stage of the 
game development business lifecycle, from forma- 
tion of the company, through design, development, 
production, publication and distribution. 

Intended for entrepreneurs who have formed or are 
considering the formation of a game development 
company, as well as consultants and independent 
contractors to such companies. 



Lecture 4102 

COIN-OPERATED GAMES: WHAT'S 
IN IT FOR YOU? 

ELAINE DITT0N 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency A, Hyatt 



10:00-11:00 



At the last Computer Game Developer's Conference, 
E3, AMOA and ASI shows there was a concerted 
effort by Microsoft and others to get developers 
interested in developing coin-operated games using 
the Intel Pentium/Microsoft Windows 95 platform. 
Incredible Technologies, who has been developing 
successful coin-operated video games on a propri- 
etary platform for over 9 years, decided to give this 
option a try. Hear about the journey and descriptions 
of the coin-operated video game business in general 
including the economics, current trends, what has 
worked, and what has not worked. 

Intended for developers who are contemplating 



developing for coin-operated machines whether 
proprietary or Public PC. 



Sponsored by 5251 

30fx Interactive 

COMPUTER GAMING WORLDS 
GAME INDEX 

3DFX INTERACTIVE 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
202 C, Convention Center 

ALL 



11:30-12:30 



Come witness the unveiling of Computer Gaming 
World's Game Index, a real-world 3D performance 
metric which generates scores based on actual 
game performance data. Computer Gaming World, 
along with leading hardware and software develop- 
ers, explains the benefits and perils of running actual 
games to test hardware performance. Other topics 
include: how to run the Game Index; what games 
are being used in the Game Index; the relevance of 
scores — what they mean; and the next steps for 
graphics acceleration. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

CGDC CLASSES 



Lecture 5201 

CRASH AND BURN: WHAT 
HAPPENED TO THE CAR WARS 
LICENSE? 

MICAH JACKSON & STEVE JACKSON 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 A, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



When Steve Jackson Games agreed in late 1995 to 
do a computer game adaptation of Steve's classic 
strategy boardgame Car Wars, the game market was 
going through many changes. LBE's were about to 
crash, and the rise of 3D accelerator cards would 
change games forever. The Pentium II was still in 
beta, and Windows95 had been released less than 
eight weeks before. By the time the project was 
eventually canceled, the development team had com- 
pletely redesigned the game two times and the com- 
pany had gained $11 million ($2 million of which 



Computer game developers' conference 





was earmarked for Autoduel Online) in an IPO and 
spent it all on projects in other divisions which were 
ultimately unsuccessful. This lecture discusses what 
went wrong from both perspectives. Steve describes 
slowly losing touch with a development team in crisis 
and Micah talks about having led that team. Video 
and stills of the production are shown and detailed 
information about the project's failure is revealed. 
The guilty are doing the presentation, so no inno- 
cents need protecting. No punches are pulled in what 
is a frank and compelling lecture on what not to do. 



Lecture 5101 

CREATING A STANDARD 
TECHNOLOGY PLATFORM FOR 
ONLINE GAMING 

MARK VANGE 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

102 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



This lecture introduces the concept of creating a 
standard technology platform to develop and deliver 
online games. The benefits of such standardization 
are clear. For developers, a standard platform would 
speed up the process of creating online games, 
allowing more energies to be focused on game 
design instead of technology, and enable worldwide 
distribution. For network providers, it would 
decrease the time spent integrating a game created 
with a standardized SDK. Further, the provider would 
not need to employ and train a team of "experts" 
for each new proprietary technology it integrates 
into its system. Overall, a standard technology plat- 
form will allow the creation and delivery of online 
games to be faster and more cost effective, and 
would help grow the industry. 

Intended for CD-ROM and online-only game devel- 
opers; ISPs/OSPs; online gaming networks; online 
content aggregators. 



Lecture 

DEVELOPING FOR 
DIRECTARCADE 

MATT SAETTLER 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Regency A, Hyatt 



4419 



3:30-4:30 



This new, PC based, coin-operated game machines 
promise to open a huge new market to PC game 
developers. Operators are willing to pay $500 for a 
good game. As an example: Windows Solitaire is a 
hot selling game in the arcade (a simple game like 
Windows Solitaire has sold over 25,000 copies). This 
lecture covers the technical details of porting/writing 
games for the arcade using DirectArcade and an 
overview of the architecture and APIs involved. 



Roundtable 3311/4110/5309 

DREAM JOBS AND NIGHTMARES: 
WORKING ENVIRONMENTS IN 
THE GAMES INDUSTRY 

DAVID ROBERTS 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Seaview B, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Seaview B, Hyatt 


10:00-11:00 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Seaview A, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 



This roundtable is intended to be a forum to discuss 
working environments in the games industry. Some 
developers are put under amazing pressure to hit 
dates. Some publishers try to micromanage products 
from a thousand miles away. Some software houses 
provide free lunch and paid overtime while others 
promise massive profit sharing as a means of moti- 
vation. If you have a story from the trenches or just 
want to know what color the grass is on the other 
side of the fence, this roundtable is for you. 



Sponsored by 4560 

HEAT Online Gaming Network 

FAST AND FURIOUS: DESIGNING 
MULTIPLAYER GAMES FOR THE 
RAPIDLY ACCELERATING 
INTERNET MARKET 

JOHN GARNER & ALEX RUBIN 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
202 B, Convention Center 



5:00-6:00 



Fast online game play is available today and is 
spreading quickly to the masses. Do you have a 
strategy to exploit it? Hear the HEAT Online Gaming 
Network and the ©Home Network's plans for low- 
latency, high-bandwidth, Internet gaming and how it 
affects multiplayer game play, game design, and 
business models. How will your multiplayer game 
take advantage of 1 0Mb/sec speeds over the 
Internet? 



Seminar 3201 

FORMING YOUR OWN COMPANY: 
THE REAL SCOOP 

CLAY DRESL0UGH 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
104 B, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 



11:30-12:30 



f 



Have you ever dreamed of starting your own game 
company? You've been programming for a game 
company for two years and, for a number of rea- 



sons, you want to form my own company. You 
attend every seminar you can on subjects you think 
you might need, from managing product develop- 
ment, to negotiating a deal with a publisher and 
come away greatly disappointed. Many lecturers 
espouse one particular route, while others withhold 
key information to entice you to buy their services. 
One lecturer for example, wouldn't discuss "stan- 
dard royalty rates," because he said, "they vary so 
widely that any information would be meaningless." 
Bull****! Anyway, you vow that if you ever got your 
company off the ground you'd come back the CGDC 
and present everything you'd learned, and fit it all in 
one lecture. Instead of selling yourself, you'd share 
an abundance of facts with curious minds to help 
them achieve their dreams. This is that lecture. 

Intended for individuals currently working in game 
development, or who wish to enter the game indus- 
try by forming their own company. In addition to lay- 
ing out a roadmap for founding a company, this lec- 
ture will also help attendees answer the important 
question of whether this is the right choice for them. 



CURRENT AND 
FUTURE INFO ON 

THE WEB @ 
WWW.CGDC.COM 



Roundtable 3211/4309/5413 

GETTING INTO THE GAME 
INDUSTRY 

DARREN REID 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency D, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 

BEGINNER 



11:30-12:30 



2:00-3:00 



3:30-4:30 



This roundtable focuses on answering participant's 
guestions about preparing themselves to work in the 
industry. Possible topics include: education; where 
the job opportunities are, what skills are in demand; 
what positions are out there; structures of compa- 
nies and project teams; resumes and portfolios; 
teamwork; and testing the mailroom of a game 
company. 

Intended for new blood looking to break in to the 
business or professionals from outside the industry 
(i.e. writers) who want in. 







Sponsored by 5451 

Logitech 

HOW AND WHY TO SUPPORT 
LOGITECH GAMING PRODUCTS 

ROBERT WUDECK 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

202 A, Convention Center 



3:30-4:30 



Logitech's market overview including market posi- 
tion, brand equity, marketing strategy, and bundling 
opportunities is presented. Logitech gaming prod- 
ucts (including mice, trackballs, gamepads, joysticks, 
and others) including features overview, Directlnput 
axis/button numbers and limitations, Force feedback, 
driver architecture, Logitech's game profiler, and the 
1998 product lineup are also discussed. 



Lecture 5102 

HOW TO START AND GROW AN 
INDEPENDENT DEVELOPMENT 
COMPANY 

MATTHEW STIBBE 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Ballroom B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11 :00 



Intelligent Games in three years has grown from five 
to thirty employees and has released four major 
titles with more in development, all without loans, 
outside investment, venture capital or getting into 
bed with a single publisher. This session briefly cov- 
ers the history of Intelligent Games and draws some 
conclusions for other would-be developers: potential 
pitfalls, dos and don'ts, current opportunities, per- 
sonnel issues, design and development strategies 
and management issues. 

Intended for anyone who has ever thought of start- 
ing a development company but doesn't know how 
or who wants to do it without borrowing, begging 
or selling their soul. 



Lecture 3301 

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 
ISSUES FOR THE GAME 
DEVELOPER 

MARC E. BROWN 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 2:00-3:00 

BEGINNER 

Understanding the recent changes in intellectual 
propert^a^snowessentialtosuccessfulqame 

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being copied or misused by others. The primary focus 



is on patent, copyright, trade secret and trademark 
protection. Clear, practical and easy-to-follow advice 
is provided. 



Lecture 3102 

LEGAL TOOLS FOR PROTECTING 
THE SALE, PROMOTION AND 
MULTI PLAYER USE OF GAMES ON 
THE INTERNET 

CHARLES KRAMER 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
102 B/C, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 



10:00-11:00 



Driven by the popularity and economics of the 
Internet, and by advances in multiplayer technology, 
games are moving online in a big way. The phenome- 
non raises many critical legal issues that affect how 
games are developed, marketed, and distributed. The 
lecture examines the legal aspects of the "multiplay- 
er" right, and what is needed to prevent it from 
becoming lost; running a website, including the legal 
notices and agreements applicable to sites that sell 
games, market games, or provide multiplayer or other 
services; distributing game demos, particularly when 
they include game "editors"; recent developments in 
the relationship between domain names and trade- 
mark protection; recent developments in the E-Data 
patent lawsuit. The lecture combines legal theory 
with practical advice by providing numerous exam- 
ples of legal documents, disclaimers and notices. 

Intended for anyone who runs a website, or buys or 
licenses game rights. 



Lecture 4401 

LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP: 
LESSONS FROM THE RISE AND 
FALL OF B0FF0 GAMES 

MICHAEL D0RNBR00K 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

104 C, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 



3:30-4:30 



This lecture is aimed at those who are considering 
starting up their own game development companies. 
The goal is to apprise you of the risks involved, and 
to share some of the lessons learned in the four year 
history of Boffo Games. Learn what skills you'll need 
to have including talent, energy, industry connec- 
tions, a high tolerance for frustration. More impor- 
tantly, learn which one is most important. As a start- 
up, it's likely you'll have to settle for less than the 
best publishers. What do you need to be prepared 
for? How can you judge the likelihood of success? At 
Boffo, we talked to everyone, and made deals with 
Media Vision, Virgin, Kaps, Time Warner Interactive, 
Time Magazine, Rocket Science, Microsoft, Hasbro, 
and MGM. We also reached the "no deal has ever 



gotten this far without being approved" stage with 
Broderbund, Psygnosis, and Accolade. How did all of 
that lead to only two games reaching the market? 
What is the probability your idea will get to market? 
Learn the importance and value of the contract. And 
once you have made a deal with a publisher what is 
the likelihood of a major change (key personnel 
turnover, reorganization, major change in strategy, 
division shutdown, or bankruptcy) before you com- 
plete the work? Learn how to negotiate the exit 
when your publisher changes its mind. Boffo made 
more on cancelled projects than on completed ones. 
Trip Hawkins, the founder of Electronic Arts, has been 
quoted as saying " There is only one industry sleazier 
than the computer game industry, pornography." 
Keep that in mind as you ponder your options. 



Roundtable 3111/4400/5109 

MAKING MONEY, MAKING 
SOFTWARE 

KEN GOLDSTEIN 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Seaview B, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Seaview A, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Seaview A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



3:30-4:30 



10:00-11:00 



What can I expect to see in a standard publishing 
contract? What is expected of my development com- 
pany by a publisher in terms of achieving milestones 
when I sign a development deal? What's the differ- 
ence between a publishing relationship and an affili- 
ated label deal? Other than the basics of advances 
and royalties, what tangible and intangible factors 
should I take into account when determining which 
company I want to publish my product? As budgets 
skyrocket, shelf space thins, and the retail market 
matures, the relationship between publisher and 
developer is increasingly under pressure — and at 
the same time, ever the more crucial. Publishers can- 
not hope to achieve substantial growth by develop- 
ing all products in-house anymore than developers 
can bank their futures on growing their businesses 
into publishing enterprises. The developer and the 
publisher need each other more than ever, and in 
this discussion addresses common problems and 
attempt to provide answers to the questions that 
could lead to our shared fortunes. 

Intended for independent developers looking to bet- 
ter prepare for product pitches to a publisher; small, 
established developers interested in readiness for 
merger or acquisition; third party developers inter- 
ested in better understanding their relationships 
with publishers to improve their business dynamics. 

Prerequisites: Anyone who has not worked on at 
least one published title will probably not find this 
session very useful. 



Rom 



OMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 





4152/5151 
Microsoft's Internet Gaming Zone 

MAKING YOUR GAMES 
AVAILABLE TO THE OVER 
ONE MILLION MEMBERS OF 
THE INTERNET GAMING ZONE 

JON GRANDE & CHIP PEDERSEN 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 10:00-11:00 

202 B, Convention Center 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 10:00-11:00 

202 A, Convention Center 

ALL 

With well over 1 million registered users, more than 
6,500 users online concurrently at peak usage, the 
Internet Gaming Zone has become one of the pre- 
mier places to make your games available to the 
masses. The Zone provides free classic games, free 
retail matchmaking, and a growing portfolio of pre- 
mium "made for the medium" games. In this ses- 
sion, members of Microsoft's Zone team discuss 
what it takes to enable access to both retail and 
online only games via the Zone. 



Sponsored by 3252 

3Dfx Interactive 

MARKETING WITH 3DFX 
INTERACTIVE 

3DFX INTERACTIVE 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 11:30-12:30 

202 A, Convention Center 

ALL 

Nothing shows off Voodoo technology better than 
your content. This session focuses on working with 
3Dfx Interactive in our co-marketing and developer 
program, Total Immersion. Logo branding, advertis- 
ing, tradeshow, OEM, retail, and web opportunities 
exist for our partners and us to show off the best 
hardware and best software available. Join us to 
receive a detailed overview of our positioning and 
current activities. 



Lecture 4201 

NEGOTIATING A GREAT GAME 
DEVELOPMENT DEAL 

DEAN GL0STER 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
104 C, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



In life, we don't always get the deal we deserve — 
just the deal we negotiate. This session covers the 
economics of basic game development, publishing, 
and distribution deals; basic negotiating techniques 



to get to "yes" quickly; provisions that are typically 
negotiable and typically not negotiable; key legal 
and strategic issues for developers and publishers; 
and important deal points that most developers and 
publishers ignore. 



Roundtable 3411/4308/5510 

ONLINE GAMES: NICHE OR 
MASS MARKET? HOW ARE 
CONSUMERS "PAYING" AND 
ENTERTAINMENT PROVIDERS 
PROFITING? 

RICK DENNY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

Pacific, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency C, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Seaview B, Hyatt 

BEGINNER 



3:30-4:30 



2:00-3:00 



5:00-6:00 



This goal of this roundtable is to discuss, and share 
theories, "facts", and anecdotes about the evolution 
of the online games market and the business of mul- 
tiplayer games. Possible topics to tackle include: 
What promising and successful business models are 
emerging? What are the "market segments" of 
games and players? What do players in each seg- 
ment want? What and how are they willing to pay? 
Are multiplayer games well-suited to advertising and 
sponsorship? Is it a legitimate business practice 
and/or good game design to sell weapons or other 
tools that potentially give some players an "unfair" 
advantage over others? How does commerce affect 
community and vice versa? How big is the potential 
audience? What will it take to reach millions and 
tens of millions of players? 



Seminar 3202 

PLAYING GAMES WITH 
WASHINGTON: GOVERNMENT 
REPORT 98 

DANIEL GREENBERG 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
103 A, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 



11:30-12:30 



Congress voted to censor the Internet. The U.S. 
Senate voted to ban computer games from all gov- 
ernment offices. Congress held hearings on the dan- 
gers of computer games and U.S. Senators executed 
an increasingly vicious annual attack on the entire 
computer game industry. The more popular our 
games become, the more attention we attract in the 
media and in Washington. We need to turn that 
attention from negative to positive (or at least neu- 



tral), but our industry has no voice in Washington. 
The CGDA has launched a grass-roots lobbying 
effort to improve our standing with lawmakers, and 
you can play too. Learn the latest facts, get some 
informed opinions, and talk about the issues that 
concern you. 



Lecture 3401 

PROFILING THE GAMER: SIZING 
THE US HOUSEHOLD COMPUTER 
GAME MARKET 

DALE STRANG 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
102 B/C, Convention Center 

ALL 



3:30-4:30 



A ground-breaking presentation of the first and only 
study that accurately sizes and segments the US 
gaming market. This study, commissioned by 
Computer Gaming World, is the first of its kind to 
survey American households for gaming habits and 
behavior of all types of computer gamers. The Com- 
puter Gaming Universe Study answers the biggest 
questions in the industry. Everything from how many 
gamers exist to the scope of online gaming. 



Lecture 5502 

SO YOU HAVE A HIT: HOW TO 
CAPITALIZE ON SUBSIDIARY 
LICENSES 

SCOn SHANNON 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

101 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



5:00-6:00 



So, you have a best selling videogame. Now what? 
How do you turn that cute little rodent you spent 
the last two years animating into the next Mickey 
Mouse? How do you present your game to publish- 
ers and movie companies? How much should you 
expect to make? How do you maximize the 
sales/licensing revenue from your deal? This session 
shows how to approach the big media companies, 
and what you can expect to make on your licensing 
deal. 

Intended for anyone who holds a videogame 
license. 







Seminar 4101 

STARTING, FINANCING AND 
OPERATING A GAME 
DEVELOPMENT HOUSE: A STUDY 
FROM ALL ANGLES 

JIM CHARNE, PHILIP CROSS, JONATHAN FUNK, 
PAT GARVEY, JASON HALL, RACHEL MCCALLISTER 
& MARK STEVENS 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 10:00-11:00 

104 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

Professionals representing the fields of accounting, 
law, venture capital, marketing and public relations 
plus a successful software entrepreneur share their 
experience and expertise with new media start-ups. 
Hear about all facets of starting your own company 
from all angles. 



Roundtable 3112/4509/5110 

THE 3D ACCELERATOR MARKET: 
A PRIMER 

CHRIS DONAHUE 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Seaview C, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Seaview B, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Seaview B, Hyatt 

BEGINNER 



10:00-11:00 



5:00-6:00 



10:00-11:00 



There are currently over 30 companies that are ship- 
ping products that claim 3D acceleration, and their 
performance can directly affect your development 
and design. That can be a good thing or a very bad 
thing. What is a base level for 3D performance? 
What features and functionality will be the lowest 
common denominator when your game ships? How 
does market share and penetration affect your 
design plan? Dare we even get into the API debate? 
This is a component of development that affects 
your schedule and bottom line. This roundtable dis- 
cusses the state of the industry, baseline functionali- 
ty, requirements, where the 3D acceleration industry 
is going and how you can make better games, more 
money and the world a better place in which to live. 



Seminar 3101 

THE GAME BIZ: GETTING IN THE 
RIGHT WAY 

GREGZESCHUK 

10:00-11:00 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
102 A, Convention Center 



BEGINNER 

Getting your toe in the door is among the most diffi- 



cult steps in becoming successful in the game indus- 
try. A number of pitfalls and traps are set for the 
unwary developer on the path to completion of a 
first game. This session focuses on the first steps of 
the journey of getting into the game biz the right 
way. The goal of the seminar is achieved by group 
discussion as well as information and anecdotes 
provided by the speakers. Main topics to be ad- 
dressed include: distillation and assessment of the 
game idea; preparation of a promotional package; 
looking attractive to publishers; choosing and 
approaching publishers; and finally an offer is on the 
table, now what? There is ample time for Q&A. 



Lecture 3421 

WE HAVE A GREAT IDEA AND NO 
MONEY: HOW TO CRAFT A 
BUSINESS PLAN FOR GAME 
DEVELOPMENT 

TODD PORTER & BOB WRIGHT 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
104 B, Convention Center 

ALL 



3:30-4:30 



Todd Porter and Bob Wright, co-authors of the ION 
Storm business lecture on the finer points of devel- 
oping a business plan for computer game compa- 
nies. How do you forecast the future? What can you 
expect it will cost to develop your game? How do 
you shake those dollars out of your publisher? An 
exercise in predicting the unpredictable. 



Seminar 

WHAT GAME PUBLISHERS 
REALLY WANT 

KELLY FLOCK, MITCH LASKY, JIM PERKINS 
& BARBARA WALTER 



4301 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Ballroom A, Convention Center 



2:00-3:00 



Do you have a great game idea or prototype? Are 
you planning to sell games industry publishers on 
publishing your game? If you want to save yourself 
time and energy (and potential embarrassment) 
come to this Q&A panel session featuring executives 
from three top games companies and learn what 
they seek in a developer before they sign on as pub- 
lisher. Topics covered include publishers' top three 
tips for a winning submission, and the minimum 
information required in a proposal. Do you need a 
title track record? Do you need to present an idea, a 
prototype, or a finished game? What about the size 
and composition of the development team? Other 
issues discussed include the financial stability of 
developer, does the genre/platform match, compen- 
sation and exclusivity, and building the value of your 
studio. 



Lecture 4502 

WHO'S KILLING ONLINE 
GAMING? 

LEONARD C. QUAM 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 5:00-6:00 

104 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

The industry analysts are telling us that online 
games are going to be a $1 billion plus market by 
2000. We seem to agree, given the number of sec- 
tions with the word "online" at last year's CGDC or 
the avalanche of corporate press releases touting 
online. Just one problem: It's not happening. While 
online game revenues have been increasing, the pre- 
dicted take-off has not occurred, nor is it anywhere 
in sight. So, what's wrong? Who's killing online 
gaming? The short answer is, all of us, the PC game 
publishers (the "Boxopoly"), the game networks, the 
investment community, the "Online Advertising 
Junta," and the game developers. This session exam- 
ines the role each group has played in creating the 
malaise in the online games market, looking at his- 
torical lessons missed and critical misunderstandings 
of the market, and offer alternatives to get the 
online market moving. 



Lecture 5301 

YEN, MARKS AND PESETAS: 
SQUEEZING EVERY PENNY OUT 
INTERNATIONAL 

KIRK OWEN 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

101 B, Convention Center 



2:00-3:00 



The lecture gives both strategic (content, develop- 
ment and design) as well as tactical (deal points, 
negotiations, choosing partners) advice on how 
companies can maximize their revenue from interna- 
tional markets. Rather than a series of "war stories", 
this lecture features specific lessons learned from the 
hundreds of international deals that Octagon has 
structured in the last five years. Starting with the 
design considerations that make a product more 
marketable internationally and moving through 
assessing partners, negotiating deals and supporting 
publishing partners once the deal is done, this lec- 
ture gives attendees numerous "walk aways" that 
help immediately with international efforts. 

Attendees responsibile for international distribution 
and publishing. Basic knowledge and experience in 
international licensing and distribution of computer 
games. 



EOMPOTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




CLASSIC CONFERENCE 



SESSIONS 




Lecture 

ABSTRACT DESIGN TOOLS: 
CHAPTER 2 

DOUG CHURCH 



4406 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

102 B/C, Convention Center 



3:30-4:30 



Abstract Design Tools are ways of thinking used to 
understand and design games. The goal is to ana- 
lyze games from various genres with such a tool, 
finding commonality which one can use in design- 
ing your own games. This talk picks several tools 
and applies them in a manner intended as illustra- 
tive, while appearing pedantic. This is somewhat a 
follow-up to last year's Using Player Intention as a 
Design Tool lecture, which is recapped in first 5 
minutes. 

Intended for game designers interested in analyzing 
games in a analytic manner. 



Seminar 4507 

ARE ADVENTURE GAMES DEAD? 

STEVE MERETZKY 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
102 B/C, Convention Center 



5:00-6:00 



You've heard it a zillion times from players, fom 
publishers, from the press, "Adventure games are 
dead." "They don't sell." " They cost too much 
money." "They're all the same." "Everything that 
can be done in an adventure game has already 
been done." Are adventure games really dead? 
Probably not. But they have been in a pretty seri- 
ous rut, and could use a good infusion of new 
ideas and energy. This is a discussion of why 
adventures are currently held in low esteem, and 
what can be done to invigorate the genre. Topics 
include: input and interface issues (ease of use vs. 
power of expression), cutting costs without cutting 
gameplay, and multiplayer games. The industry is 
ready to ship adventure to the morgue. Come and 
brainstorm ways to save a genre that has given us 
some of the shining lights of computer gaming, 
from Zork through Myst. 



GAME DESIGN 



Lecture 4525 

BARBIE COOL LOOKS FASHION 
DESIGNER: A CASE STUDY 

ANDYRIFKIN 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
104 A, Convention Center 



5:00-6:00 



Learn how an innovative design strategy is developed 
from initial concept to final product with a case study 
of Barbie Cool Looks Fashion Designer, the sequel to 
the best-selling girls software hit Barbie Fashion 
Designer. This session addresses technical issues, 
design features and development aspects associated 
with the making of this 1998 Barbie Software For 
Girls release. Also discussed is how Mattel Media 
worked in conjunction with Digital Domain, the full- 
service digital studio which recently completed work 
on James Cameron's Titanic, one of the most highly 
touted films of the decade. 



Lecture 4319 

CHALLENGES OF TECHNOLOGY 
AND DESIGN IN MASSIVELY 
MULTIPLAYER ONLINE GAMES 

RUSEL DEMARIA, DAN SCHERLIS, MIKE SELLERS, 
JOHN SMEDLY, & RICH V0GEL 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
103 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



They are big, expensive, sexy, did we say big? They 
are massive! Games like Meridian 59, Ultima 
Online, and the upcoming Everquest and Acheron's 
Quest are out to prove that thousands of people 
can play together simultaneously online. But, as 
our panelists tell you, there are challenges galore. 
We examine these games from many perspectives. 
Technology issues include ways to minimize lag 
and server overloading, discuss whether bandwidth 
is really a problem, and talk about the technology 
of the future and how it impacts online gaming. 
We'll also talk about security issues and client 
side/server side information storage. Design issues 
include challenges of testing, keeping the environ- 
ment fresh and keeping players coming back 
(avoiding churn). This session also addresses issues 
of business models, and, finally, we'll look at how 
visions of a massive multiplayer online game may 
change during development... and after the prod- 
uct is launched. 



Roundtable 4515/5216 

COMPUTER ROLE-PLAYING 
GAMES 

CATHYRN MATAGA 

5:00-6:00 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency C, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency C, Hyatt 

BEGINNER 



11:30-12:30 



The group discusses ideas for improving role-playing 
games. How can role-playing games best integrate 
plot and gameplay? What can be done to make com- 
bat more interesting? Can role-playing computer 
games take anything from actors, who play roles? 



Roundtable 3114/4112/5512 

THE CONSOLE RPG AFTERMATH 



GABRIEL VALENCIA 




WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 


10:00-11:00 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Shoreline A, Hyatt 


10:00-11:00 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Shoreline A, Hyatt 


5:00-6:00 



INTERMEDIATE 

How does the release of Final Fantasy VII affect the 
design and implementation of computer role-play- 
ing games on the PC? In light of it's proposed PC 
release, will game developers flock to imitate the 
stylized gameplay of Japanese console RPGs? If 
not, what can PC developers learn from this genre, 
and what constitutes a balance between traditional 
dungeon crawlers and console RPGs? 

Intended for anyone interested in the future of com- 
puter role-playing games. 






im 



Lecture 4506 

CREATING CHARACTER ACROSS 
MEDIA 

CHRISTY MARX 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 5:00-6:00 

Regency A, Hyatt 

BEGINNER 

Whether writing interactive games, television 
shows, animation, movies, comic books or novels, 
one thing remains the same, good characters are 
vital. This session presents experience in all these 
media and in developing shows for television and 
shows how one goes about creating characters, 
and whether it's possible to have true characters 
and true interactivity at the same time. 



Sponsored by 



3452/4252/5351 



CREATING TITLES FOR THE 
ARCADEPC 

ROSS SMITH 



WEDNESDAY, MAY6 
202 C, Convention Center 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 

202 C, Convention Center 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

202 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



11:30-12:30 



2:00-3:00 



This session focuses on game development for the 
Quantum3D ArcadePC platform for deployment to 
the coin-op market. Historical and forecasted mar- 
ket data is provided to quantify the value proposi- 
tion of this opportunity. The Intel OAAF reference 
standard for PC-based coin-op is provided. 
Technical system specifications for the ArcadePC 
related to performance, user input and display 
interfaces are covered in detail. This session 
includes a guest speaker with subject matter exper- 
tise to share their lessons learned in developing 
games for arcade distribution. Specific guidelines 
for developing and porting titles for the ArcadePC 
in contrast to a home PC are explored. 

Prerequisite: Knowledge of realtime 3D game 
design and development and technical background 
of realtime 3D playback platforms is helpful. 



Lecture 5506 

CRITICAL DESIGN ISSUES FOR 
INTERNET-ENABLED 
MULTIPLAYER GAMES 

YU-SHEN NG 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

102 B/C, Convention Center 



5:00-6:00 



Based on Mpath's experiences in adapting over 20 
games to the Internet, we discuss critical issues in 
network performance and user interface which 
repeatedly surface as frequently overlooked issues 
in Internet game design. In a case study of three 
games, we identify Internet-specific performance 
and user interface requirements, evaluate their 
effect on project schedules, and discuss trade-offs 
in design to meet the needs of the Internet. 

Intended for experienced game developers in the 
middle of their first or second titles designed for 
the Internet. 

Prerequisites: Prior design or development experi- 
ence for networked gameplay, awareness of issues 
in network latency and bandwidth are prerequisites. 



CURRENT AND 

FUTURE INFO ON 

THE WEB @ 

WWW.CGDC.COM 



Lecture 3108 

DESIGN DOCS: WHAT'S THE USE? 

ALEX DUNNE, JOHN JACK, TODD PORTER, & 
STEVE SCHREK 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
104 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



This session, targeting developers new to the world 
of design documents, explains how to create a 
detailed design doc to help a developer sign a deal 
with a publisher, or to kick start a project inside of 
an established company. It answers questions such 
as: How solid should a design be before you begin 
production? How do you write design documents 
on technology, and who should do it? Do design 
documents help speed up the help/documentation 
process? What's the benefit of keeping your design 
document synchronized with changes made during 
production? Who's responsible for updating design 
docs? Game designer, producer, engineer, or all 



three? How do you break the design document 
process down into documents that make sense? 



Roundtanle 3412/4111/5410 

DESIGN VS. TECHNOLOGY: HOW 
WILL TECHNOLOGY LICENSING 
AFFECT DEVELOPMENT 

MIKE WILSON 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 


3:30-4:30 


Seaview B, Hyatt 




THURSDAY, MAY 7 


10:00-11:00 


Seaview C, Hyatt 




FRIDAY, MAY 8 


3:30-4:30 


Regency D, Hyatt 





ADVANCED 

With the growth of technology licensing as a busi- 
ness model for game development in the last few 
years, many questions have arisen. Does it really 
make sense to count on technology from an outside 
group to build your games on? What advantages 
can come from licensing technology? How does it 
work? How can your titles compete with 'cutting 
edge' tech titles, if you're working with technology 
that was completed for a game that shipped last 
year? Game developers, new and old, may be trying 
to decide the best route for their teams. Should they 
do their own R&D to try to create proprietary cutting 
edge technology, or should they just license strong, 
finished technology, and get on with game design. 
What are the risk factors for both design and 
finances 7 

Prerequisite: The need to understand the concept of 
game engines or underlying technology as building 
blocks of game design. 



Roundtable 3212/4410/5511 

DESIGNING FOR COMMUNITY: 
HOW TO COPE WITH THE 
PROBLEM CHILDREN OF THE 
ONLINE WORLD 

DAVEWEINSTEIN 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency C, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Seaview C, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Seaview C, Hyatt 



11:30-12:30 
3:30-4:30 
5:00-6:00 



The online gaming market has traditionally been 
about creating communities of players. Since online 
games have historically had lower production val- 
ues than retail products, these communities were 



COMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




the foremost means of keeping and satisfying a 
customer base. Keeping that community working, 
and designing games that foster the community 
while making it more difficult for player sabotage is 
the focus of this roundtable discussion. 



Lecture 5507 

DESIGNING FOR KIDS: 
INFUSIONS OF LIFE, KISSES OF 
DEATH 

CAROLYN MILLER 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



5:00-6:00 



Designing games for kids offers an alluring oppor- 
tunity to let your imagination fly. It's also nice to 
know that you may even do some good, by slip- 
ping in some educational elements. But watch out! 
Kids are a tough audience, and this arena is laden 
with booby traps and pitfalls. How do you make a 
product lively enough to attract the kids, but with- 
out the violence that will turn off their parents? 
How do you avoid the life saver candy and white 
bread syndromes to character design? How can 
you layer in educational components without being 
boring? This presentation examines a useful array 
of tools you can use to create great products 
for kids. 



Seminar 4108 

DESIGNING FOR ONLINE 
SPECTATING 

LEONARD C. QUAM 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 10:00-11:00 

104 B, Convention Center 



As game designers we concentrate on the player 
experience — the interaction between players and 
computer. We don't think about the interaction 
between game and audience, because computer 
games are typically played in a private environment, 
limiting the audience to kids sitting around the 
PlayStation waiting for their turn at the controller, 
or office-mates taunting as you play Quake. The 
online game changes this environment. Computer 
games now have the opportunity to become spec- 
tator events. So, why is this a good thing? Let's start 
with economics; we know that games are a bad 
vehicle for advertising (don't we?). Players don't 
want to dick through an AT&T ad while battling 
dragons, it breaks the fantasy. And, as online adver- 
tising shifts to result-driven pricing models, games 
will be poor generators of income. Spectator areas 
can help offset this by creating a more passive, ad- 
friendly environment for advertising within games. 



Secondly, socializing and community building are an 
essential part of any online game. But what's more 
boring than a chat client or bulletin board? 
Spectating can create a better place to socialize or 
a more entertaining lobby. Remember Photon? 
Before you went into the arena you assembled in a 
room with your opponents, taunted them, and 
watched the game in progress. That got you psy- 
ched to play. Third, spectator interface can provide 
an ideal interface for new players to learn the 
game. Often the most daunting part of online 
games is the incessant fragging of newbies. 
Spectating can be a great way to learn the ropes 
and avoid summary execution. This session explores 
the design challenges in creating a viable spectator 
experience in online games. 



Lecture 3107 

DESIGNING GAMES FOR BROAD 
AUDIENCES: GAME SHOWS 
ONLINE. 

ROBERT TERCEK 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
104 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



They're back! Game shows are suddenly hot again, 
and they're drawing huge audiences on the 
Internet. Learn about the planning and design deci- 
sions behind the online launch of multiplayer 
Jeopardy!, Wheel of Fortune, and The Dating Game. 
More than a case study, this session identifies the 
critical design attributes of games for broad audi- 
ences on the Internet, including brand-building, 
optimizing player engagement, and designing con- 
tent that attracts and retain habitual players. 
Therefore, the audience should have a strong inter- 
est in producing, developing, and distributing 
online-only gameplay. 



Seminar 3408 

DESIGNING GAMES FOR THE 
CASINO INDUSTRY 

ANDREW MOUND 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

101 A, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 



3:30-4:30 



Currently, there are over 100,000 video slot 
machines in casinos worldwide. Most of these 
video slots are capable of accepting new game 
chips, just like a Nintendo machine, creating a new 
market opportunity for game designers and game 
companies. Learn about this new market, the ele- 
ments of a casino video game, and why this type of 
game design is so different from any other. 

Intended for game developers wishing to break into 



or learn about this unusual and lucrative part of the 
game development market. 



Roundtable 3315/4312/5212 

DESIGNING MULTIPLAYER 
CONSOLE GAMES 



STEVE TAYLOR 




WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency C, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Shoreline B, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 


FRIDAY, MAY 8, 11:30 

Shoreline A, Hyatt 


12:30 



BEGINNER 

This presentation covers problems and ideas specif- 
ically related to multiplayer games designed for 
consoles or other restricted environments. Topics 
covered include solutions to multiple players on a 
single screen (camera tricks, split screen variations, 
etc.) and real-time and turn-based multiplayer 
games. Focus is put on promoting active participa- 
tion of all players through a single console, with a 
look at linked consoles and the future of online 
console games. Differences and similarities with 
online PC game design are discussed. Other topics 
include teams and alliances, game configuration, 
and joint control of a single entity. 

Intended for game designers interested in multi- 
player game issues related to console systems. 



Lecture 5208 

DESIGNING ONLINE GAMES FOR 
THE MASS MARKETS 

MIKE SELLERS 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 11:30-12:30 

Ballroom B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

Who is the mass market, and why should we care 
about'them? Why is everyone so hot to make their 
games appeal to women, seniors, and young girls? 
How are these people different from traditional 
gamers? This session attempts to answer these 
questions and relate some principles for designing 
games and game-spaces meant to reach the semi- 
mythical "mass market". Design such as threshold, 
commitment, and focus are discussed. Also 
explored are meta-issues such as safety, comfort, 
and freedom in Internet games, and how these 
relate to the elusive but over-hyped issue of online 
community. Finally, hear a few words on changing 
business models and what this has to do with the 
work of designing games for online distribution 
and play. 

Intended for game designers, producers, and anyone 






t 



trying to figure out how to build viable communi- 
ties on the Internet. 



Seminar 5407 

DESIGNING WOMEN: WOMEN IN 
THE GAMES INDUSTRY 

ELLEN GUON BEEMAN & SHERI GRANER RAY 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 3:30-4:30 

102 B/C, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 

This is the an opportunity to hear from and talk to 
some of the successful women in the game indus- 
try. Hear their horror stories, learn how they sur- 
vived and how you, too, can succeeded in the 
game industry! 

Intended for women interested in getting into the 
computer games industry and others looking for 
tips on how to move ahead. 



Lecture 4505 

THE DESIGN PHIL0SPHY BEHIND 
TOTAL ANNIHLATI0N 

CHRIS TAYLOR 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Ballroom B, Convention Center 

ALL 



5:00-6:00 



Game design is a nebulous artform and there are 
no sure things. Chris Taylor's idea is to reduce it to 
philosophy which acts like a universal formula for 
finding the right answer in an industry frought with 
the peril of an everchanging set of trends and 'hot 
genres'. He applied this philosophy when designing 
Total Annihlation. Good ideas come from every- 
where. A good designer knows a good idea when 
he hears it, not when he thinks it up. 



Lecture 3307 

DO ONLINE GAMES STILL SUGK? 

DANI BUNTEN BERRY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

Ballroom B, Convention Center 



2:00-3:1 



This session is a follow-up on last year's lecture, enti- 
tled Imaginary Playmates in Real-time or Why Online 
Games Suck. In current online games artificial (Al) 
opponents have been replaced by other humans 
who could just as well be imaginary as far as other 
players can tell. Not until we design specifically for 
the online world and not just add multiplayer to 
standard game designs will we see what this medi- 
um is really good at. This talk offers some sugges- 



tions for designing games for this new environment. 

Seminar 3208 

EDUCATION WITH A CAPITAL "E" 

L0URDES B0URAS, HA PHAN, & ALMA TORRES 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 11:30-12:30 

101 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

Educational titles seem to suffer the same miscon- 
ception as healthy cereals. If something is good for 
you, then it can't possibly taste good, or as in the 
case of educational titles, it can't really be fun, hip, 
or have high production value. As game developers 
of educational titles, we're out to prove that the 
"healthy cereal syndrome" is a misconception. You 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

CGDC CLASSES 



can develop educational titles that are fun, cool, 
and above all, hip! While the goal for all game 
titles is replayablity, the goal for an educational 
title is learning. Replayability is the vehicle in which 
the user practices or applies the educational objec- 
tives. In some ways, it is more challenging to pro- 
duce an educational title than a game title. How 
can you weave in educational content while main- 
taining the integrity of gameplay and story line? 
With so much emphasis on learning, the design 
process for an educational title is quite different 
from that of a game title. This seminar is an intro- 
duction on how to design good, clean, games that 
are not only engaging, but also educational! 



Lecture 

EFFECTIVELY USING KIDS' 
FEEDBACK & PLAY TESTING 

GAME DESIGN 

MIKE R0TENBERG 



5207 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 B, Convention Center 

ALL 



11:30-12:30 



how to optimize game design through user feed- 
back. Understand how to incorporate playtesting 
into the development process. Assure your games' 
success by incorporating kids' reactions and input 
throughout the design, alpha and beta stages. 
Learn how consumer research can be used to opti- 
mize navigation, leveling, hint structure and ulti- 
mately gamer satisfaction. 



Lecture 

ENTRAIN 

BRIAN M0RIARTY 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
104 C, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 



3207 



11:30-12:30 



The Professor considers his own profession in this 
mind-bending lecture on the esoteric significance 
of the gamewright's role. Issues of purpose and 
responsibility are exhumed, thoughtfully brushed 
off and then cast screaming into the metacosmic 
Void. Expect the usual creepy music and curious 
visual accompaniment. Persons susceptible to hyp- 
notic suggestion or epileptic seizures are advised to 
select another lecture. 

Intended for your tired, your poor, your huddled 
masses yearning to breathe free. 

Prerequisite: Disappointment with what we have 
come to. 



Roundtable 3215/4113/5513 

FASCIST GAME DESIGN 



ANTHONY FARMER 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

Pacific, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Shoreline B, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



10:00-11:00 



5:00-6:00 



Are you an ardent supporter of egalitarianism in 
game design, or do you believe that a dictatorship 
is the most efficient form of management? Do you 
eschew or embrace the design by committee 
mantra? Are the best games designed by teams or 
by one or two individuals with a strong vision and 
enough money to back them up? However you feel 
about it, there's someone who'll disagree with you. 
Attend this roundtable for the opportunity to set 
them on the right track... 



Do you want to improve your hit ratio? Get kids 
involved early in the development process. Learn 



COMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




Roundtable 3313/4210/5112 ^^^^^^^^^^" 

THEFUTURE OF STRATEGY CURRENT AND 

PHILSTEINMEYER FIITIIRI IIUFfl Mil 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 2:00-3:00 lU I Ulit Mill Ull 

Shoreline A Hyatt TU[ UfED gj) 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 11:30-12:30 

« " WWW.CGDC.COM 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 10:00-11:00 

Shoreline A, ^^■■■■■■■^■■■iBHHHB 



Strategy games are one of the oldest categories in 
this business. For years strategy games had the 
ugliest graphics, most complex interface, and worst 
Al of any game genre. Recent games have solved 
the first two problems, and as for Al, well, two out 
of three ain't bad. But when the inevitable back- 
lash against clone and conquer games occurs, will 
the strategy genre be able to stay on top? This 
roundtable explores the many changes and issues 
facing the strategy market. Topics of interest 
include real-time vs. turn based, multiplayer vs. sin- 
gle player, 2D graphics vs. 3D graphics, cross-genre 
games (i.e. action strategy, role-playing-strategy), 
managing gameplay complexity, and reaching out 
to non-strategy gamers. 

Intended for anyone involved in strategy game 
development. 



Roundtable 3115/4512/5213 

FXVS GAME CONTENT: WHEN IS 
GREAT TECHNOLOGY NOT 
ENOUGH 

JAMES DANIEL 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 
Regency C, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 



10:00-11:00 



5:00-6:00 



11:30-12:30 



Participate in a lively discussion of why the next 
killer games will be more than just the latest tech- 
nology. Questions addressed include: Are the game 
players getting sated with great visuals? How do 
you keep the techno junkies from killing your great 
design? 



Lecture 5107 

GAME DESIGN: DO YOU HAVE 
WHAT IT TAKES? 

SHANNON DONNELLY 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

102 B/C, Convention Center 



10:00-11:00 



A game designer is part dreamer, part salesman, 
part visionary who can lead a company to the 
promised land of hits, and also part obsessed opti- 
mist who believes it can be done. There's a need 
for good designers out there, but how do you con- 
vince the world you can do it? How do you take 
your ideas and turn them into solid, salable game 
proposals? We'll go over what it takes to design a 
game including brainstorming techniques, creating 
game mechanisms, developing a user-interface, 
and insight into the hard work that lays behind 
the play. 

This lecture is intended for anyone who has a great 
game idea. ..only you're not sure what to do with it. 



Lecture 4207 

GAMES FOR THE REST OF US: 
PUZZLES, BOARD GAMES AND 
GAME SHOWS 

scon KIM 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
102 B/C, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



Online services are bringing interactive media to 
people who haven't been interested in technology, 
including women and older adults. The games that 
thrive in this environment are not violent teenage 
boy games, but more casual social thinking games 
like daily newspaper puzzles and television game 
shows. This session studies games such as You 
Don't Know Jack, The Incredible Machine and 
MetaSquares, discuss design issues, and point out 
opportunities for innovation. 



Lecture 3119 

GETTING AN EDUCATIONAL BANG 
FROM YOUR KILLER GAME 
ENGINES 

JOHN BLOSSOM &MARG0 NANNY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
103 A, Convention Center 



10:00-11:00 



What if the best of the game developer community 
took on the challenge of reapplying cutting-edge 
game engines to major educational content areas? 
What would the software look like? What would 
the challenges be in building it? How can we lever- 
age the years of lessons in game development to 
help move educational software to a new level? 
Uncover the many issues related to merging the 
best of game technology with quality educational 
content. The session includes exemplary samples 
from education, an analysis of game engines, and a 
preview of an upcoming Lucas Learning product 
using the Jedi Knight real-time 3D engine that 
incorporates Star Wars assets into a mentally chal- 
lenging game for kids. 



Roundtable 3213/4511/5412 

HEY, WHAT'S YOUR STORY? 
CREATING A RICHER WORLD FOR 
GAMEPLAY 

LARRY TUCH 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency D, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Shoreline A, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Shoreline A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



5:00-6:00 



3:30-4:30 



Stories have been shown to enrich the gaming 
experience in a variety of ways. They can sharpen 
the sense of need and urgency that drives game 
play, they can help to frame its design, and they 
can infuse an interactive environment with a com- 
pelling atmosphere. From Wing Commander IV to 
Titanic and from Diablo to The Last Express, story 
and game design demonstrate a synergistic power. 
To harness this power, designers and developers 
must develop stories that support their titles' con- 
cepts. That requires a sense of which story genres 
work best with certain game genres. It also 
requires a knowledge of how story elements such 
as theme, structure and character, work together. 
This roundtable examines how stories work best in 
various game genres and how participants can 
manage story development for maximum effect. 
Success stories, war stories, and cautionary tales 
are encouraged. 







* 



Roundtable 3415/4212/5312 

HOW CAN YOU COMPETE 
AGAINST THE WORLD WIDE 
WEB? ATTRACTING AND KEEPING 
THOSE DARN CUSTOMERS FOR 
YOUR ONLINE GAME 

ERIC GOLDBERG 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 


3:30-4:30 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 


11:30-12:30 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Shoreline A, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 


INTERMEDIATE 





The web is so vast, and growing so rapidly, that it 
overwhelms consumers with choices and encour- 
ages an even shorter attention span than televi- 
sion. The received wisdom in the games field is that 
people gravitate to good games (via word of 
mouth, etc.) and, once there, community keeps 
them there. The reality is that it's hard to get peo- 
ple to come to your site, it's much harder to get 
them to play your game, and it's appallingly hard 
to keep them coming back. The 1 5 year-old con- 
sumer online industry has experience in attracting 
and keeping people; can these techniques be 
adapted to the Web? Or are we setting ourselves 
up for a zero-sum game where the hard-core 
gamers, the only group willing to take on the Web 
to find the best games, are ferociously competed 
over by online game providers? 



Sponsored by 3253 

Microsoft 

HOW TO IMPLEMENT FORCE- 
FEEDBACK INTO YOUR GAME 

MATTHEW COILL 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
202 A, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



This session starts with an overview of force-feed- 
back programming for the developer who has not 
begun to use force-feedback and transition into a 
more in-depth presentation of issues the experi- 
enced force-feedback programmer must deal with. 
Some topics include: different hardware and tech- 
niques for programming once for all devices; vari- 
ous approaches to implementation, pros and cons 
of each; where to find forces, which forces are real- 
istic for your game, and which are compelling for 
the user; common mistakes and misguided 
assumptions; what some of the negative impacts 
are and how to avoid them. There is some time set 
aside to for questions at the end. 



This session is more about implementation issues 
and less about code; so non-programmer product 
planners considering force-feedback are welcome. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

C6DC CLASSES 



Lecture 3308 

THE INTERFACE IS THE GAME 

WILLIAM V0LK 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
104 C, Convention Center 

ADVANCED 



2:00-3:00 



Interfaces are more than convenient ways to pro- 
vide interaction with a game universe. In many 
ways the interface IS the game, since it represents 
the interactive portion of a product. A great inter- 
face can allow for a perception of "infinite possibil- 
ities" in a game universe. A poor interface can 
make even the most visually appealing game 
appear as "interrupt able media," sequences of lin- 
ear content with a few interactions scattered 
about. This lecture covers the methods used in 
designing interfaces for games and educational 
titles. No particular interface is "the best." There is 
no "best" interface. Good interfaces match their 
game content well enough to become transparent. 
Different game types, audiences, and subject mat- 
ter may require different interfaces. Interface 
design can make or break a company's strategy. 
For example, some computer game interfaces sim- 
ply do not translate well on a video game platform. 

Topics covered include: how interfaces deter- 
mine game play possibilities; text parsers to icons, 
a survey of interfaces; architectural stabilization, 
when is a standard a standard.; nterface concepts; 
blocking functions, multiple paths; building inter- 
faces that are "Easy to use, hard to beat."; think- 
ing about interface in a game design; how technol- 
ogy influences interface design; mass market titles 
via interface; bridging computers and video game 
systems, is it possible? Examples from existing 
products to show to illustrate how interface deci- 
sions effect a product. 



Lecture 3323 

THE JACK PRINCIPLES: CHANGE 
THE WAY YOU THINK ABOUT 
INTERACTIVE DESIGN 

DAVID NATHANIELSZ& JAMIE VANN 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
102 B/C, Convention Center 



2:00-3:00 



You Don't Know Jack is not designed to be played 
on a computer. It is designed to be played on tele- 
vision. It is designed to compete with television. 
The fundamental design principles upon which the 
Jack experience is based apply well beyond trivia 
games, and are relevant to any interactive plat- 
form. Attendees walk away understanding these 
principles, why they should use them, and thus 
gain a concrete framework to approach projects in 
a very different way. 



Lecture 5308 

MULTIPLAYER GAME DESIGN: 
GAME DEVELOPERS' CHIEF 
PITFALLS 

JONATHAN BARON 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Ballroom B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



Large scale multiplayer gaming will one day 
become the major entertainment medium that 
many have proclaimed it will be. Nothing that elic- 
its such strong emotion and devotion can stay 
obscure forever. Yet its growth remains unspectacu- 
lar. While many in the industry believe this slow 
growth is due to economic or technical factors, the 
real cause of the medium's retarded development 
is the games industry itself. It is wholly ill equipped 
to deliver the product its present and future audi- 
ences crave. The problem: the games business 
understands neither the product nor the audience. 
Like early photographers who struggled to make 
their photographs look like paintings, game com- 
panies are trying to make a new art from look like 
an old art form. They don't know any better. This 
lecture explores the distinctive elements essential 
to large scale multiplayer games, using several cur- 
rent offerings as examples. 

Intended for any game developer with an interest in 
large scale multiplayer online gaming. 



f- 



OMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFER 






Lecture 

MULTIPLE CHARACTER 
INTERACTION BETWEEN 
BELIEVABLE CHARACTERS 

ADAM FRANKS ANDREW STERN 



5408 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



When autonomous characters interact with one 
another, users expect them to form complicated 
social relationships. In Petz II, PF Magic's latest 
Virtual Petz product, Dogz and Catz form a wide 
variety of relationships which develop over their 
lifetimes and are affected by user interaction. How 
does one design and implement this triangle of 
interactivity to allow for believable yet entertaining 
relationships? What are the appropriate behaviors 
and the archetypical relationships to include? 
(Should they hump?) What kinds of new animation 
techniques need to be developed to allow petz to 
touch or wrestle with each other but still remain 
fully interactive for the user? How much of this 
behavior can be scripted by non-programmers and 
how much requires code from a software 
engineer? 

Intended for anyone interested in lifelike, fully 
interactive computer characters; autonomous 
agents; artificial intelligence and artificial life. 



Roundtable 3414/4411/5113 

MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES AND 
KILLER GAMES COLLIDE 

MARGO NANNY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Shoreline A, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Shoreline A, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 



3:30-4:30 



3:30-4:30 



10:00-11 :00 



Conceptual leaps through hot games: Is it possible? 
The educational software industry over the past 10 
years has yielded a few little "golden nugget" en- 
gines that have allowed users to make profound con- 
ceptual leaps through software experiences. A proba- 
bility machine that dynamically flips 10,000 coins per 
minute and enables us to watch the dynamic graph 
change and grow can alter our thinking on the topic 
forever. Software pieces which enable us to manipu- 
late time and space can allow us to grasp things in 
new ways. There are plenty of profound examples 
which use technology to help the brain make inter- 
esting conceptual leaps, yet these products have 
never come to the forefront. Meanwhile the latest 
clone of Command and Conquer or JumpStart 4th 



Grade are heralded by the industry as the leading us 
all down the road to success. This discussion is for 
those who might one day want to take on the chal- 
lenge of combining great gaming and conceptual 
content for products of the future. Is it possible? 



CURRENT AND 
FUTURE INFO ON 

THE WEB @ 
WWW.CGDC.COM 



Roundtable 3113/4310/5310 

PREMISES IN STORY GAMES 



HAL BARW00D 




WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 


10:00-11:00 


Shoreline A, Hyatt 




THURSDAY, MAY 7 


2:00-3:00 


Regency F, Hyatt 




FRIDAY, MAY 8 


2:00-3:00 


Seaview B, Hyatt 




INTERMEDIATE 





Story games require an organizing principle, just 
like a novel or a movie, a wellspring from which 
characters, settings, situations, and action flow. This 
is something we commonly call a premise. What 
are the necessary ingredients? How do authors 
think them up? What choices lead to hits? What 
special considerations should game designers 
apply? Given the severe constraints of time, energy 
and budget that restrict our desires to construct 
game worlds, how can we learn to step beyond the 
convention of the haunted house? Join us as we 
throw aside dull detail and tackle one of the big 
questions! 



Rountable 3312/4409/5111 

PROBLEMS OF PUZZLE GAME 
DESIGN 

ALEXEYPAJITNOV 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Seaview C, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Seaview B, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Seaview C, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



3:30-4:30 



10:00-11 :00 



The creator of Tetris moderates a discussion of the 
following problems and issues in puzzle game 
design: modern formats for the puzzle games 
including stand alone, pack, and incorporation into 
story; new types of puzzles including image-based, 
3D, and knowledge-based puzzles; networking and 
multiplayer puzzle games; and puzzle audiences 
and marketing strategies. 



Lecture 4107 

PUTTING THE GHOST IN THE 
MACHINE 

ERNEST ADAMS 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Ballroom A, Convention Center 

ALL 



10:00-11 :00 



"The ghost in the machine" is a phrase used by 
materialists to refer to the belief, often held by reli- 
gious people, that there exists a soul or spirit inde- 
pendent of the body. Materialists deny the exis- 
tence of such a thing. They claim that the brain is 
merely a machine, and that the spiritualists are 
fruitlessly looking for a ghost in it. Our task as 
computer game developers is the exact opposite: 
we know we are starting with a machine, and we 
are seeking to *put* a ghost in it. We try to hide 
its predictable and deterministic nature, and to cre- 
ate the illusion of life and intelligence. In the early 
days this was done by calling the system random 
number generator. Nowadays we are a bit more 
subtle, but so far, we have not been very success- 
ful. This lecture offers some suggestions for better 
ways to put the ghost in the machine, for making 
computer games seem real through philosophy, 
psychology, anthropology, and the tools of other 
media. 



Lecture 5108 

THE "REAL" EXPERT'S PANEL: 
KIDS 

ROGER HL0ZBERG& PANELISTS 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 10:00-11:00 

Regency A, Hyatt 



Why do they like the games they like? The "real" 
experts panel is composed of four kids, 16 and 
under, playing the games they love to play. The 
Q&A session finds out why. 








Roundtable 3413/4510/5411 

SECRETS OF SUCCESSFUL 
GAMING COMMUNITIES 

AMY JO KIM 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 3:30-4:30 

Seaview C, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 5:00-6:00 

Seaview C, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 3:30-4:30 

Regency E, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 

What are the essential elements for developing an 
online gaming community? Why do some gaming 
systems develop a robust, thriving community, 
while others languish in obscurity? What role do 
dans and guilds play in comunity development? 
How important are hosts and support personnel? 
How should they be compensated? What are the 
best ways to handle conflict and disruptions? 
Anyone interested in community-building within an 
online gaming system is welcome. 

Prerequisite: Familiarity with online gaming 
environments. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

CGDC CLASSES 



Lecture 

SELECTING CONTENT FOR 
LOCATION-BASED 
ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS 

JONSNODDY 



4219 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
101 B, Convention Center 

ALL 



11:30-12:30 



Location-based entertainmnet has arrived and 
small attractions are one of the drivers in these 
businesses. The small attraction exists in an vague 
region somewhere between video games and a 
theme park attractions. It shares characteristics of 
both, but has unigue reguirements that complicate 
its design, installation and operation. This lecture 
describes the process of selection, development, 
installation and operation of small LBE attractions 
and is aimed at content developers. 



Seminar 5422 

70% COMPLETED: HELLO 
WRITER! 

KATHERINE LAWRENCE 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 3:30-4:30 

101 A, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 

Your hot new game is 70% completed. The video 
looks terrific, the gameplay is marvelous, but ... it's 
lacking something. Perhaps it is time to talk to a 
writer? This seminar discusses what a writer can 
bring to a game that's almost finished, from punch- 
ing up dialogue to increasing drama. Based upon a 
game already released, the participants get the 
chance to look at preliminary material and help 
polish it into the final product. This includes analyz- 
ing what needs further work, coming up with solu- 
tions that won't materially affect the budget, and 
tips on working with artists and programmers 
without stressing egos. 

This class is intended for anyone wanting to learn 
what a writer can do for a game, even when most of 
the game is completed. 



Lecture 4307 

SILICON HOLLYWOOD: A STATUS 
REPORT 

NOAH FALSTEIN 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

104 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



Several years ago many were trumpeting the fabled 
convergence between the interactive expertise of 
Silicon Valley and the movie magic of Hollywood. 
Since then we've had promising convergent com- 
panies like Rocket Science Games and Any River 
Entertainment drop out of existence. But other 
companies like LucasArts Entertainment and 
Westwood have had great success even with 
decades-old movie licenses and movie-caliber com- 
puter graphics. Where has the convergence failed, 
where has it succeeded, and what kinds of lessons 
does this hold for the future? 

Intended for anyone interested in applying the 
expertise of traditional media development to the 
creation of interactive titles. 



Rountanle 3316/4213/5313 

TEAMWORK IN MULTIPLAYER 
GAMES: ADAPTING OLD 
GAMEPLAY TO A NEW MEDIUM 

HAMILTON CHU 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency D, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Seaview A, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Shoreline B, Hyatt 



2:00-3:00 



11:30-12:30 



2:00-3:00 



In the physical world, teamwork has long been a 
vital component of gameplay. Pick up basketball 
has a universal rule set, well known roles, full voice 
communication and more resolution than you can 
shake a stick at. The advent of Quake Clans and 
Ultima Online guilds clearly demonstrates that 
being in a group working for a common cause 
(usually kicking butt) can be fun online as well. This 
roundtable discusses the viability of this newly 
available source of gameplay and how to maximize 
its potential. Subjects covered include the design of 
interface and the social structure necessary for suc- 
cessful! emergence of teamwork. 

Intended for game designers and producers inter- 
ested in the design and development of online 
gameplay and society. 



Lecture 5307 

10 COMMANDMENTS FOR 
WRITING ADVENTURE GAMES 

BOB BATES 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 2:00-3:00 

102 B/C, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 

Year after year, adventure games receive the same 
scathing reviews. Don't let your next game be one 
of them! This session covers the rules for putting 
together games that are entertaining, well- 
designed, and guaranteed to get positive reviews. 

Designers and writers will receive the most benefit, 
but producers, programmers and artists won't be 
bored. 



Computer game developers' conference 





CURRENT AND 
FUTURE INFO ON 

THE WEB @ 
WWW.CGDC.COM 



Roundtable 3426/4218 

WE HAVE NO LIVES: RPGS, 
PLAYERS, AND THE FUTURE 

TOM HALL & WARREN SPECTOR 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency F, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency E, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



11:30-12:30 



Roundtable 

VIVA VARIETY! 

MIKESTEMMLEE 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Shoreline B, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Shoreline A, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Seaview C, Hyatt 



3314/4211//5211 



2:00-3:00 



11:30-12:30 



11:30-12:30 



As our industry continues its Marlon Brando-like 
expansion, with more and more titles clogging the 
shelves every day, the variety of these titles seems 
to be shrinking. Are we, the game designers, get- 
ting less creative, or are we merely giving the pub- 
lic what they want? Has the increasingly hit-driven 
nature of our business driven out our desire to take 
risks on guirkier projects, or is this just a perfectly 
natural conseguence of the "maturation" of our 
industry? Should we be concerned about this phe- 
nomenon, or is the original premise flawed to 
begin with? 



This roundtable is a spirited discussion on the sub- 
ject of role-playing games. Subjects to be covered 
include a definition of RPGs, so we can all be on 
the same page and not talk about adventures and 
the like. Also, how did we get where we are today? 
What are the seminal games that advanced the 
form most dramatically? Are there lessons to be 
learned from paper gaming? Can the console guys 
learn something from the PC developers? (Let's 
take it as a given that the PC developers can learn 
a lot from the console guys!) Who's doing what 
today including case studies of the best and worst 
in console, PC, single-player and multiplayer RPGs 
are discussed. (Bring your slings and arrows for this 
one.) What lies ahead? Is the hype about online 
gaming going to drive the final nail into the coffin 
of single-player, story-oriented, character-driven 
games? Are massively multiplayer, persistent 
worlds the be-all and end-all of the role-playing 
experience? And are role-playing games really lim- 
ited to a niche market or can we reach beyond the 
geek audience? Should we even try? 







Roundtable 4521/5120/5519 

WHERE'S THE CONTENT? 

RUSELDEMARIA 

5:00-6:00 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Pacific, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Pacific, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency E, Hyatt 



10:00-11 :00 



5:00-6:00 



Many people wish games could be more engaging 
to the cerebral cortex as well as to that nut-sized 
kernel of prehistoric action/reaction that sits atop 
the spinal chord. Is there a next, content-rich, evo- 
lution of gaming? Can you make successful games 
with strong stories and appealing characters? Are 
there lessons to be learned from classic games? 
Will gamers tire of the same old retreads with ever 
faster 3D engines? What are the big software pro- 
ducers doing to keep their audiences? What are 
the small studios doing that will revolutionize gam- 
ing? Are tomorrow's games approaching the holy 
grail of mass marketability? If not, how can we 
grasp that elusive and most coveted goal? 



Roundtable 3214/4311/5125 

WHITHER (OR WITHER) 
WARGAMES 

MARK BALDWIN 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency E, Hyatt 


11:30-12:30 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Shoreline A, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency D, Hyatt 


10:00-11:00 


INTERMEDIATE 





Computer wargames have been around as long as 
there have been computer games. They have 
evolved from the crude text games to very sophisti- 
cated (and expensive) products that we see today. 
The guestion is, where are wargames going, or are 
they going nowhere? This roundtable examines the 
subject and is a discussion of whether computer 
wargames are going to be a viable genre in the 
future. 




CLASSIC CONFERENCE 



SESSIONS 



e 



PRODUCTION 

KEYNOTE 



RICHARD HILLEMAN 

HERDING CATS: HOW TO BUILD, MANAGE AND SUSTAIN SUCCESSFUL TEAMS 



FRIDAY, MAY 8, 



11:30-12:30 



The days of building titles by ourselves are pretty 
much gone. Faery Tale Adventure and Powerdrome 
were the last gasps of this creative ideal, and like the 
Amiga, they are gone as viable commercial models. 
Increasingly, we find that the quality of our products 
and their commercial prospects are tied not to the 
individual talent of our organizations, but to our abili- 
ty to get best creative and productive work from the 
largest contingent of our teams. A delicate dance, 
management finds itself weaving the disparate moti- 
vations and goals of a variety of different digital 
artists and engineers. 

This just speaks to the needs that emerge in a single 
project. The real challenge is to get these organiza- 
tions to survive and grow through multiple titles and 
experiences, growing their skills and abilities to meet 
the challenges of the future. It requires objective 
vision and tough decisions. Rarely does our business 
give us the stability to examine these quandaries for a 
moment. The key to understanding this process is to 
recognize that maximizing the future value of the 
team and the present value of the current title are 



BALLROOM A, CONVENTION CENTER 

almost always the same thing; assembling individuals 
that grow together, not apart, as their mutual experi- 
ences grow. 

Richard Hilleman has been an employee of Electronic Arts ever 
since he escaped the Nevada Test Site 14 years ago. While hid- 
ing out at EA, he has been producing product for the personal 
computer and video game markets. Some of those have included 
Chuck Yeager's Flight Trainer, Ferrari Formula One, Indy 500, 
Earl Weaver Baseball, John Madden Football, NHL Hockey. He 
has also played significant roles on the Wing Commander III, IV 
and Prophecy titles, and worked at Jane s Simulator lines as 
general manager before returning to production. In the last year 
he has served production roles on Lost World and Skullmonkeys 
titles for Dreamworks while driving the PGA Tour Golf line. He is 
a past co-winner of the CGDC's producer of the year, and a cur- 
rent board member of the Academy of Interactive Arts and 
Sciences. He has played Ice Hockey twice a week for 13 of those 
14 years and still has all of his teeth. 



■ 



GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




Lecture 5203 

THE ADVENTURES OF DON 
QUIXOTE: SHOULD I BUILD OR 
LICENSE GAME TECHNOLOGY? 

PAUL SCHUYTEMA 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

101 A, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



Every season, more and more PCs under the 
Christmas tree means more and more players. Our 
core audience of game players is growing by leaps 
and bounds, and they all want the newest and 
coolest games to play. We're just the people to 
give 'em what they want, but in our fiercely com- 
petitive market, is it better to license proven tech- 
nology and concentrate on content? Or is it better 
to shoot for the brass ring and create our own 
bleeding edge game technology? This presentation 
addresses some of the fundamental questions we 
need to ask ourselves before we dive headlong 
into development. There are compelling reasons to 
license an engine or technology, but there are 
equally powerful reasons to develop the technolo- 
gy itself. We'll try to address the issues to help you 
make a more informed decision for your own cor- 
ner of the industry. 



Lecture 4503 

ARTISTIC LICENSE: ACQUIRING, 
MANAGING AND DEALING WITH 
LICENSES 

ELIZABETH BRASWELL 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
101 A, Convention Center 



5:00-6:00 



Times are tough and rather than spending $750k 
to develop a new property you're thinking about 
trying the Sure Thing: to go after a popular charac- 
ter, TV show, book or movie, get the license, spend 
a little, make a million. There's just one catch. It 
ain't that easy. In this session, we'll go over the 
stickier details of acquiring a license, working with 
the licensor, creating an innovative product which 
will appeal to fans and even sublicensing (creative- 
ly making more than you expected). 



Lecture 5503 

ASSET TRACKING AND DATABASE 
DESIGN 

BRIAN DUNCAN & AND TYL0R HAGERMAN 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency A, Hyatt 



5:00-6:00 



The development process requires the tracking and 
monitoring of literally thousands of assets from 
sound to graphics to schedules. A well designed 
database can help tame this nightmare and 
smooth every facet of development from design to 
release. Usually relegated to the realm of "put it in 
the spreadsheet," or "every man for himself," a 
database and asset tracking system can and should 
be the cornerstone to the production process. 
Modern databases allow for automation of most of 
the drudge work of asset tracking and building. 
Utilizing the programming capabilities of a data- 
base allows for the integration of everything from 
sound deliveries to the creation of temporary art- 
work and sounds to the final build process before 
CD production. But a database must also have the 
end user in mind, simply putting everything into a 
table isn't going to solve any problems even with 
the best of code. If a database isn't intuitively 
designed and easy to use, then it won't be used. 
This session takes a look at what a database is and 
how to effectively use one to track and process all 
of the assets for an entire project. Examples of 
asset tracking and processing systems that were 
built with Microsoft Access are used in this session. 



Lecture 5321 

DEBUGGING PEOPLE 
PROBLEMS: CASE STUDIES IN 
GAME DEVELOPMENT 

JOHN RAE-GRANT 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 B, Convention Center 



2:00-3:00 



We're all aware that the biggest problem with soft- 
ware projects is that they rely on people. What do 
you do when faced with incompetent manage- 
ment, abusive peers, withdrawn developers, or 
meetings that truly suck? While there's no straight- 
forward answer to any tricky situation, there are 
some general principles which tend to make these 
truly confusing and bizarre interactions somewhat 
more understandable, and even manageable. Using 
case studies from actual game development teams, 
this session exposes some of these principles. It 
turns out that conventional wisdom is usually mis- 
leading and myopic, and that many "traditional" 
sources of people management principles are 
hopelessly out of touch with the new realities of a 



dynamic and emerging work place. Managing for 
creativity is dramatically different from managing 
for minimal friction. 



Roundtanle 3210/4313/5214 

DVD-ROM PRODUCTION 

MARK DAY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency F, Hyatt 


11:30-12:30 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency F, Hyatt 


11:30-12:30 


INTERMEDIATE 





DVD-ROM compounds the problems of customer 
expectations in regards to quantity and quality of 
FMV content. Come with your questions and anec- 
dotes about converting or creating product for this 
new storage/playback medium. Can DVD-ROM 
offer developers anything beyond high-quality 
audio/video playback? Share thoughts and experi- 
ences to find out. 



Lecture 3303 

FMV IN COMPUTER GAMES 
SUCK! OR DO WE JUST SUCK AT 
FMV? 

MARK DAY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

Regency A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



Consumers are expecting more and more creative 
content in the products they buy both in technolo- 
gy, gameplay and storyline. The popularity of DVD- 
ROM bodes a manyfold increase in those expecta- 
tions. This session focuses on the creation of Full 
Motion Video/Film (FMV) sequences as an integrat- 
ed component of the interactive entertainment 
product. Through visual examples and war stories 
this session covers story development, technology 
issues/evaluation, design constraints, 
production/postproduction, compression and finally 
integration into the product. Leave this session 
with strategies on how to create and integrate 
high-quality, meaningful Full Motion Video/Film 
into your products giving players a rich contextual 
environment in which play, and most important- 
ly.. .so they don't suck. 








Lecture 

A GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL 

DEVELOPER/PUBLISHER 

RELATIONSHIPS 

DAN SCHERLIS 



4203 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
104 B. Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



You've formed the team, designed the game, and 
signed (or expect to sign) the deal. Now it's time to 
work with those other guys who control the destiny 
of your beloved project. Developer/publisher rela- 
tionships are varied, complex and, like any other 
close and committed partnership, seldom easy. A 
successful partnership is based on clear, shared 
expectations, on and trust, and on open communi- 
cations. That's easily understood, but hard to estab- 
lish when cultures clash, time zones are different, 
employees turnover, and schedule slips combine to 
crank up the pressure. This session delivers nut-and- 
bolt practical suggestions for making it work, illus- 
trated with a variety of examples. 

Intended primarily for game developers who either 
have, or are forming, development or affiliate label 
relationships with publisher/distributors. 



Rountable 3317/4214/5514 

HERDING CATS: THE ART OF 
MANAGING DEVELOPMENT 
TEAMS 

HARALD SEELEY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency E, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency F, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



11:30-12:30 



5:00-6:00 



Anyone who has been involved in a project which 
has gone over budget, come in late, had it's fea- 
ture set slashed or reguired the development team 
to put in a superhuman effort to meet a deadline 
knows that managing a team of programmers, 
designers and artists can be likened to hearding 
cats. Learn from other's experiences and see what 
worked, and what didn't. Find the common 
denominators that cause some projects to flounder, 
while others sail to completion almost effortlessly. 
Developers, producers, programmers, executive 
management, and anyone else responsible for 
delivering a finished and working product in a 
finite amount of time with limited resources. 



Lecture 4402 

THE MAKING OF BLADE RUNNER, 
SOUP TO NUTS! 

LOUIS CASTLE 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Ballroom B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED 



3:30-4:30 



This session is a no holds barred presentation of 
why and how Westwood built the first real-time 
adventure game, Blade Runner. There is a complete 
description of the conceptualization, direction and 
implementation of Blade Runner's design, art, writ- 
ing and technology. Initial goals, what we ended 
up with, and how we got there are presented Also 
covered are highly technical concepts is the sim- 
plest terms possible. Explored are: 3D art tools, 
optical motion capture, plug-in development, voxel 
technology (in detail), continuous skin objects, 
video and audio compression, DirectX, 3D hard- 
ware acceleration, goal oriented Al, art direction, 
interactive script development and asset manage- 
ment. Time permitting, questions are answered 
honestly and completely. 

A technical background will be useful in getting the 
most out of the talk but hopefully not necessary to 
make it worth your time. 



Roundtable 3116/4115/5314 

MANAGING GAME 
DEVELOPMENT: BEST 
PRACTICES, FROM CONCEPT TO 
PRODUCTION 

FORREST WORKMAN 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency 0, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency F, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11 :00 



10:00-11:00 



2:00-3:00 



The dream is always the same: someone's got a 
killer game idea, it shouldn't be too difficult to do, 
just need a few new things here and there. It 
should only take 1 2 months to develop. Everything 
seems reasonable, management gives it the green 
light, two and a half years later you produce half 
the game you set out to do. So what happened? 
How does game development go wrong? Can you 
minimize cost and schedule overruns? How have 
other developers managed to get a game out on 
time and in budget? This roundtable attempts to 
look at real world game development from start to 
finish. 



Lecture 3302 

MARKETING VS. DEVELOPMENT: 
THE INTERNAL BATTLE 

JOSH GORDONS ED Z0BRIST 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
101 A, Convention Center 

ALL 



2:00-3:00 



Why are those pesky marketing folks making unre- 
alistic demands on the development process? Why 
can't those 'airy' development groups deliver any- 
thing on time? We've all heard the complaints, let's 
look at the reasons. Josh Gordon (representing the 
developers and producers) and Ed Zobrist (repre- 
senting the marketers and businessmen) role play 
their way through this age old issue from pre-pro- 
duction through release in all its bloody glory. From 
business strategy to the realities of development, 
from marketing plans to the creative process. 
Protective gear is advised. 



Lecture 4103 

RAPID PROTOTYPING: CHEAP 
WAYS TO VISUALIZE 3D GAMES 

NICOLE LAZZAR0 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

104 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



Leonardo had a sketch pad, Hitchcock a story- 
board, the Miller brothers a HyperCard stack, and 
Jordan Mechner a foam-core mockup. What can 
game developers learn from these great designers' 
approach to low-cost prototyping? Frequently chal- 
lenged by compressed schedules and the pressure 
to innovate and create the next mega hit, game 
designers have found ways to try out new ideas 
with off-the shelf materials, thus avoiding the 
potentially high cost of custom C code. This session 
shows examples of cheap and simple methods 
other game developers have used to help them 
invent new paradigms, improve design ideas, and 
make games more fun. The session features 
"behind the scenes" prototypes used in creating 
real games, including some made with paper, foam 
core, HyperCard, Director, Photoshop, video tape, 
and cheap 3D visualizations - all of these are tools 
that allowed design teams to test screen art, 
gameplay, and navigation for 3D worlds. 

Intended for anyone inventing new methods of 
gameplay with compressed design and production 
schedules or those who still think prototypes must 
be coded by hand. 



! 



PUTERffl 



ELOPERS' CONFERENCE 





Roundtable 3416/4513/5414 

THE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE 
PUBLISHER...OR HOW TO 

HANDLE THE MASTER WITHOUT 
BECOMING THE SLAVE 

JOEMINTON 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency C, Hyatt 


3:30-4:30 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency F, Hyatt 


5:00-6:00 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 


3:30-4:30 



From pitching a contract to shipping the final ver- 
sion, the independent developer's relationship 
with their publisher is a delicate challenge. There is 
a lot to being a developer: managing internal 
teams, finding and holding onto the right employ- 
ees, maintaining cash flow, keeping up with tech- 
nology, trying for the next big hit. The relationship 
with the publisher can get a bit lost. But, since 
they are the ones that pay the bills, and since they 
can often cancel a contract with little cause, suc- 
cessfully managing that relationship is vital. This 
session presents experiences with the following: 
promoting the game concept, "Do we really need 
a working demo?"; negotiating the contract with- 
out getting screwed, "What are the best royalty 
methods?"; working with producers, "Even if they 
really want to be game designers.?"; handling 
unexpected demands, "The sudden fiscal year 
deadline! "; keeping the publisher happy, "So they 
will hire us again." 

This roundtable is designed for the owners, man- 
agers and internal producers of independent game 
development houses that have titles under their 
belt. Attendees should be part of an independent 
development house. 



Lecture 3423 

THE SECRET WORLD OF COIN-OP 
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 



MARK PIERCE 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



This session is an overview and glimpse into the 
secret world of coin-op video game product devel- 
opment. This lecture uses as a base, the process in 
place at the oldest video game company on the 
face of the earth. After a brief overview of the his- 
tory of the industry and its development needs, the 
session discusses aspects of Atari's process and 
how it relates to the unique requirements of the 
highly competitive coin-op market. Knowledge of 



CURRENT AND 
FUTURE INFO UN 

THE WEB @ 
WWW.CGDC.COM 



processes in place at other coin-op companies is 
also shared. Issues of team dynamics and structure, 
corporate culture, coin-op design principles and the 
importance of focused direction at broad-based 
markets is presented. The last 1 5 minutes of the 
session is devoted to Q & A in an attempt to quell 
the designing public's intense hunger for knowl- 
edge in this arena. 

This course is of interest to anyone with a desire to 
learn about the development processes of coin-op 
video game product. Those interested in the recent 
"Public PC" hype might gain insight into the chal- 
lenges of this market. 



Lecture 3424 

S/W AND H/W COMPATIBILITY 
TESTING 

MARK BORDER, JEANNE COLLINS, JEFF L0NEY, 
R0DRIG0 SILVEIRA & MEGAN QUATTR0CCHI 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
103 A, Convention Center 



3:30-4:30 



This panel discussion covers software and hard- 
ware compatibility when testing games for the 
retail marketplace. Does the cost outweigh the 
benefits? Do the benefits outweigh the costs? How 
do we support hardware driver versions? What 
minimum specifications should be set? Please plan 
on joining our distinguished panel of experts and 
pose your own questions. 



Lecture 5118 

SOFTWARE 
INTERNATIONALIZATION 

ARICWILMUNDER 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 10:00-11:00 

101 B, Convention Center 



Developers are finding that in order to be success- 
ful in today's software industry, they need to be 
prepared to release their product not only into the 
US domestic market, but into the global market- 



place as well. While many companies have been 
able to localize their products for Europe, Asian 
markets may still elude them. More often than not, 
gaps of many months separate the release of inter- 
nationalized versions, creating havoc with market- 
ing plans and hurting worldwide sales potentials. 
As a developer, the goal is clear: simultaneous 
release domestically, and internationally. Come to 
this lecture and find out how. 

This session is open to a wide audience, from 
novices considering developing for the larger 
worldwide market, to experienced software profes- 
sionals who have worked in the software interna- 
tionalization field, and who would like to compare 
approaches with their colleagues. 



Lecture 5103 

"SO, YOU WANT TO ADD VIDEO 
TO YOUR GAME..." 

MICHEL KRIPALANI, PHIL SAUNDERS 
&TIMTEMBREULL 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

101 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED 



10:00-11:00 



Through this seminar attendees learn how to pro- 
duce high quality video segments for use in games. 
Pre-production topics include storyboarding, cos- 
tumes, prop construction, casting and pre-visualiza- 
tion techniques. Production issues teach what to 
do and what not do once on-stage. Topics include 
lighting, camera work, on-stage scene matching, 
lens matching and general stage management 
issues. Post production issues cover video digitiz- 
ing, matting using "Ultimatte," editing and special 
effects techniques. Game players are not going to 
stop cringing at video cut scenes until game pro- 
ducers learn to use the production techniques that 
have been in place in Hollywood for years. 



Roundtable 



3117/4413/5114 



STATE OF THE ART IN 
AUTHORING SYSTEMS 

JAIME SIGLAR 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency E, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency F, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency F, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



3:30-4:30 



10:00-11 :00 



Authoring systems have come a long way since 
PLATO; current commercial authoring tools allow 
nearly codeless development for many educational 
and adventure titles, and custom environments 








allow 3D and web delivery of game content. This 
roundtable compares and contrasts the current 
offerings in authoring tools, including industry stan- 
dards such as Director and mTropolis, as well as 
more customized offerings. Also examined are where 
the opportunities are for new authoring tool devel- 
opment; what developers would like to see in 
upcoming tools or upgrades to existing tools. This 
session is aimed at developers and producers who 
are currently using authoring systems, and those 
who are in search of the ideal system for prototyping 
or development. 



Lecture 4217 

TESTING: INTERNAL VS. 
EXTERNAL 

DAVID MAXEY, HAROLD RYAN, PETE SCHNEIDER, 
R00RIG0 SILVEIRA & RAWSON STOVALL 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

102 A, Convention Center 

ALL 



11:30-12:30 



Should you do all your testing in-house, or does it 
make sense to outsource some or all of it? What 
are the risks to outsourcing? What are the bene- 
fits? What aspects of testing are most likely to suc- 
ceed or fail when outsourced? Hear from outsource 
testers and industry veterans about how they made 
decisions about outsourcing and how outsourced 
testing worked (or didn't) for them. 



Lecture 5303 

THIS ISN'T ROCKET SCIENCE 

GRAEME BAYLESS 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



Why is it that most software projects go over bud- 
get, over time, and end up shipping with huge 
numbers of serious defects? It isn't rocket science... 
and it can be stopped, without spending four hours 
each day making schedules or six months before 
beginning coding writing a design doc. If you want 
to make a good game, you need only follow some 
basic principles. 



Lecture 4303 

12 NEW RULES OF THUMB FOR 
SHIPPING GREAT SOFTWARE 

JIM MCCARTHY 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

104 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



The idea that Team=Software occurred to Jim 
McCarthy in early 1994. He has since been 
obsessed with exploring the implications of this 
notion. Taken to its logical conclusions, this concep- 
tually simple formula yields some startlingly origi- 
nal approaches to "shipping great software on 
time. " There are twelve new rules of thumb that 
Jim discusses here from the foundation of an 
"under-construction" book which details a com- 
prehensive theory of software team dynamics. 
These rules have grown out of the McCarthy 
TeamworX Software Development BootCamp. 
BootCamp is an ongoing laboratory wherein 
dozens of teams from all over the world have simu- 
lated team formation, and completed full develop- 
ment cycles. This enabled Jim to accumulate the 
experience of "shipping" over 80 software prod- 
ucts with at least as many teams. The key insights 
from this work is presented at this session. 



Seminar 3203 

WHEN TEAMS WORK, WHEN 
TEAMS BREAK 

DON DAGL0W 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

104 A, Convention Center 

ALL 



11:30-12:30 



This session reviews the tactics and styles that 
characterize effective teams (and those associated 
with disasters) with an emphasis on practical ideas 
you can use immediately by focusing on steps to 
take when starting a project, as well as how to cor- 
rect problems. Review issues facing in-house teams 
in big companies, independent development teams 
working with publishers, and other combinations. 
The format is audience-driven, and includes discus- 
sion of current problems faced by people attending 
the session. 



Seminar 5402 

WHY ARE SOME TEAMS MORE 
EFFECTIVE THAN OTHERS? 

MATTHEW STIBBE 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 A, Convention Center 

ADVANCED 



3:30-4:30 



All teams are created equal but some are more 
equal than others. Why is it that some teams are 
dramatically productive and effective while others 
struggle to be the sum of their parts? Is it magic or 
are there things that team members or managers 
can do to build team effectiveness. This session 
addresses those issues through an audience partic- 
ipation and Q&A. 

Intended for people with a year or two experience 
in team based product development 



CHECK OUT THE 
ADDENDUM FOR 



CGDC CLASSES 



Roundtable 4114/3217/4412 

WHY DO MOST GAMES SUCK? 
GETTING QUALITY INTO THE BOX 

JOHN RAE-GRANT 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 11:30-12:30 

Harbor B/C, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 10:00-11:00 

Regency F, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 3:30-4:30 

Shoreline B, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 

Many games don't install. Those that do, often 
crash. Of those that don't crash, few are fun. Of 
those that are fun, few are innovative. Why is the 
industry so stuck in the mire of mediocrity? What 
can we do to bring a quality aesthetic to the cre- 
ation of innovative games? Is there anything to be 
learned from the pseudo-science of software engi- 
neering? How do we make games that don't suck? 



I 



OMPUTER 6AME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 





CLASSIC CONFERENCE 



SESSIONS 



PROGRAMMING 

KEYNOTE 




JON BENTLEY 

BLAZING FAST CODE 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 5:00-6:00 

Your program may be perfect in every other way, but 
it is useless if it is too slow. Speed is best built in from 
the beginning; cost models and prototypes can help 
guide early design decisions. The key to performance 
is usually in the selection of algorithms and data 
structures. Near the end of the development, pro- 
grammers can tune the code to improve run time. This 
lecture illustrates these important performance tech- 
niques by tiny little case studies with monster-huge 
speedups. This session is designed to be accessible to 
any working programmer who is familiar with the C 
programming language. 



BALLROOM A, CONVENTION CENTER 

Jon Bentley is a member of technical staff in the Computing 
Sciences Research Center at Bell Laboratories. His research inter- 
ests include programming techniques, algorithm design, and the 
design of software tools and interfaces. He has written three 
books on programming, including Programming Pearls, and arti- 
cles on a variety of topics, ranging from the theory of algorithms 
to software engineering. In his fifteen years at Lucent 
Technologies (formerly part of AT&T), he has been a member of 
teams that have shipped software tools, switches, telephones 
and web services. 



Lecture 3406 

A FORMULA IS WORTH A 
THOUSAND KEYFRAMES 
MATHEMATICALLY DERIVED REAL 
TIME CHARACTER ANIMATION 

PETER AKEMANN 



Rountable 3220/4315/5417 

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN 
COMPUTER GAMES 

ERIC DYSBAND 



Rountable 3210/4314/5416 

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN 
COMPUTER GAMES 

NEIL KIRBY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
102 A, Convention Center 



3:30-4:30 



3D character animation has become a staple of 
computer games. Traditional approaches to this 
have been keyframed animation and more recently, 
motion capture. This session discusses a different 
approach of producing character animation by 
mathematically simulating the physics of a human 
figure. This technique had been applied successfully 
in creating the VSIM Human Motion Engine which 
will make its debut in Die by the Sword. 

Intended for programmers interested in physics 

and/or character animation. 

Prerequisite: Some familiarity with physics. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Seaview B, Hyatt 


11:30-12:30 


WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Seaview A, Hyatt 


11:30-12:30 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Seaview B, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Seaview A, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Seaview B, Hyatt 


3:30-4:30 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Seaview A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 


3:30-4:30 



These roundtable sessions provide the opportunity 
to discuss Al related topics with other developers. 

Intended for all computer game developers of all 
genres, with an interest in discussing the latest 
ideas and implementations of artificial intelligence. 



These roundtable sessions provide the opportunity 
to discuss Al related topics with other developers. 

Intended for all computer game developers of all 
genres, with an interest in discussing the latest 
ideas and implementations of artificial intelligence. 







*J 



3209/4316/5418 

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN 
COMPUTER GAMES 

STEVE WOODCOCK 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 11:30-12:30 

Seaview C, Hyatt 

THDRSDAY, MAY 7 2:00-3:00 

Seaview C, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 3:30-4:30 

Seaview C, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 

These roundtable sessions provide the opportunity 
to discuss Al related topics with other developers. 

Intended for all computer game developers of all 
genres, with an interest in discussing the latest 
ideas and implementations of artificial intelligence. 



Seminar 5405 

BRINGING ENGINEERING 
DISCIPLINE TO ENTERTAINMENT 
DEVELOPMENT 

GORDON WALTON 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Ballroom B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



This session describes the experience of our com- 
pany in adapting elements of the Software 
Engineering Institute Capability Maturity Model for 
software development. This is a model of software 
development that describes best practices in devel- 
oping computer software in government and 
industry. While certification of the use of this model 
methodology is required for some government con- 
tracts, our company just wanted to improve the 
quality and predictability of our software develop- 
ment process. All the decisions we made and the 
outcome of these when applied to developing 
game software are illustrated. Thirty minutes of the 
session is used for Q&A to discuss the model and 
what was learned by implementing these elements. 



Lecture 3105 

BRINGING YOUR CODE UP TO 
SPEED 



RON FOSNER 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Ballroom B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



What do you do when your producer tells you that 
the game needs to run faster and you're six weeks 
away from your gold date? Do you stare at the ren- 



F 



dering code looking for something to tweak, or do 
you adjust some run-time parameters to speed 
things up? Getting to the point where you know 
and control where the CPU budget of your program 
is being spent is a very comfortable position, and 
getting you to that spot is the topic of this lecture. 
The first covers getting, collecting, and using timing 
measurements. We'll discuss why you'd want to 
make a profiling test part of your regular build pro- 
cedures. The second part talks about how to adjust 
those numbers through programming techniques, 
tricks, and using hardware. Did you know that you 
can use a 3D accelerator to speed up your 2D 
game? If not, then this lecture is for you. 

Intended for programmers who want to be ahead of 
the curve. 



Lecture 5205 

BUILDING A BETTER MOUSE: Al 
LESSONS FROM ARTIFICIAL LIFE 

ROBERT HUEBNER 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

102 B/C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



The study of artificial life or A-life is a growing 
research topic in the academic world. Unlike classic 
Al, which models human behaviors such as plan- 
ning and reasoning, artificial life research focuses 
on the behaviors of simpler life forms - animals and 
insects - to improve intelligence in robotics and 
computers. Since action/simulation game Al is simi- 
lar to building virtual robots, much of this research 
is readily applicable to the game Al problem. This 
presentation focuses on how A-life concepts can be 
applied to game Al to improve the quality and sim- 
plify the implementation of these virtual robots. 
Case studies from the development of Jedi Knight 
are used as a practical illustration of these con- 
cepts in a commercial game. 

Intended for programmers responsible for creating 
Al for action/simulation games. 



Lecture 5504 

BUILDING ADVANCED 
AUTONOMOUS Al SYSTEMS FOR 
LARGE SCALE REAL-TIME 
SIMULATIONS 

JOHN LAIRD 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Ballroom A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



5:00-6:00 



In October of 1997, DARPA held a large distributed 
multiplayer game, with more than 3,700 entities 
participating in the Synthetic Theater of War (STOW- 



OMPUTER 6AME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




97). These entities were all computer generated 
spread over 300 computers. The most advanced of 
these computer generated entities were the air 
forces, controlled by a program called TacAir-Soar. 
TacAir-Soar planes could "fly" all Air Force and 
Navy Air missions, obeyed military doctrine and tac- 
tics, and were completely autonomous. These Al sys- 
tems flew missions based on standard military mis- 
sion briefings, where all interactions (air-to-air, and 
air-to-ground) were completely unscripted. They 
interacted with human controllers via simulated 
radios, and speech input and output. This session 
discusses challenges of building Al systems with 
large knowledge bases (over 5,200 rules) for real- 
time applications. This presentation includes an 
overview of Soar, the parallael, hirearchical rule- 
based architecture underlying TacAir-Soar, as well as 
the specific the organization and encoding of 
knowledge in TacAir-Soar. This lecture concludes 
with a discussion the applicability of these tech- 
niques to computer games such as Descent. 



Seminar 4305 

BUILDING COMMERCIAL GAMES 
IN JAVA: HOW WE DID IT 

GARNER HALL0RAN 



THDRSDAY, MAY 7 

101 A, Convention Center 



2:00-3:00 



Despite what you may have heard, it is possible to 
create viable commercial games in Java. The design- 
er and lead engineer on Tom Clancy's Politika (the 
first major commercial game in Java), swaps tales of 
horror from the battlefront, emphasizing the joys of 
working in a brand-new language with beta tools. 
Topics of discussion includes: cross-platform devel- 
opment (the big lie); writing native methods; wran- 
gling 32-bit images; and the speed issue. 

Intended for industry professionals who are inter- 
ested in the possibilities of using Java in their 
games. Moderate technical background, some 
knowledge of Java 



Sponsored by 



5352 



CODING THE IDEAL DIRECT3D 
GAME 

RICHARD HUDDY 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 2:00-3:00 

202 B, Convention Center 

ADVANCED 

This session presents a detailed technical explana- 
tion of the reasons behind key technical decisions 
which underpin the ideal approach to extracting 
the highest possible performance in a Direct3D 




game. Optimal approaches to state changes, effi- 
cient texture handling, maintaining good paral- 
lelism and the economical use of the CPU create a 
strong foundation for high performance game 
development. Examples from real world applica- 
tions which get it right — and wrong — illustrate the 
benefits available to the developer who gets the 
architecture right, as well as exemplifying the 
potential costs of getting it wrong. 



CURRENT AND 
FUTURE INFU ON 

THE WEB @ 
WWW.CGDC.COM 



Sponsored by 



4451 



COLLECTING MONEY ON THE 
INTERNET: GAMEPLAY BY THE 
CLICK 

RUSS JONES 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

202 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



Online game developers are starting to provide 
interactive play over the Internet. With advertising 
too intrusive for gamers, and credit cards too expen- 
sive, many are now exploring pay-per-dick and other 
microcommerce applications. This session provides 
an overview of the MilliCent microcommerce system 
and takes a close look at the various application 
models including pay-per-dick, micro subscriptions, 
tiered-service levels, promotional incentives, rebates 
and loyalty points. Attendees learn about the tech- 
nological underpinnings of microcommerce, how it 
can be guickly added to existing online game sites, 
and built into future interactive environments. This 
session demonstrates consumer use of the MilliCent 
microcommerce system on the Internet today. 
Game-specific development and implementation 
scenarios are also discussed. 

Intended for anyone who needs to understand how 
gameplay can be metered and sold by the click over 
the Internet. 

Prerequisites: Some familiarity with URL, HTTP and 
web server development is also helpful. 





Lecture 5406 

COLLISION DETECTION IN 
PACMAN GHOST ZONE: 
COLLISION TECHNIQUES IN A 3D 
ENVIRONMENT FOR MAN AND 
CAMERA 

GILBERT COLGATE 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Ballroom A, Convention Center 

A0VANCED 



3:30-4:30 



This session focuses on the use of mathematics and 
programming techniques for characters who need to 
bounce, jump, get smashed, and slide into various 
random surfaces. Other problems addressed include 
a mathematical and game design issue of a charac- 
ter who may be hidden from the camera by obsta- 
cles, or may shove the camera up against a wall. 

Intended for programmers working on 3D action 
titles. 



Lecture 3407 

CREATING REALISTIC EFFECTS 
WITH 0PENGL 



3:30-4:30 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

104 A, Convention Center 



This session describes some techniques for creating 
realistic imagery with OpenGL. Among the topics 
covered are several methods for creating real-time 
reflections and discussion on their tradeoffs. 
Creation of procedural textures and how to apply 
them to geometry are also shown. Simulation of 
natural phenomena such as fire, smoke, clouds, and 
caustics are demostrated. Performance issues and 
how the various algorithms can be efficiently 
implemented on PCs are discussed throughout. 

Intended for OpenGL programmers who want to 
create visual effects that go beyond the basic mate- 
rial in the OpenGL Programming Guide. Attendees 
should have basic experience with 3D graphics and 
OpenGL. Familiarity with the material in the OpenGL 
Programming Guide is desirable. 



Lecture 

CROSS-PLATFORM 
DEVELOPMENT: EASIER AND 
HARDER THAN YOU THINK 

ERIC KLEIN 



4119 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
102 B/C, Convention Center 



10:00-11:00 




Cross platform development is one of the more dif- 
ficult tasks a development team faces today. Using 
Bungie Software's Myth: The Fallen Lords as a case 
study, the finer points of developing a title for mul- 
tiple platforms (Windows 95/NT, Mac, consoles) is 
examined. Why target multiple platforms? How do 
you design for cross platform development and 
what are the technical hurdles? And finally, why 
console development alluded Bungie. 

Intended for anyone interested in leveraging soft- 
ware development dollars across multiple plat- 
forms. This session is primarily focused at software 
engineers and product managers. 



Lecture 5510 

CURVED SURFACES VS. 
DISCRETE MULTIRES0LUTI0N 
MODELS 

MURALI SUNDARESAN 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 C, Convention Center 

ADVANCED 



5:00-6:00 



One of the ways to improve the realism of a 3D 
graphics rendered scene is to improve the geomet- 
ric complexity of models used in the scene. The 
complexity of the geometric model must itself be 
controllable depending on its size on the screen 
(i.e. dynamically change based on its level-of- 
detail). There are currently two choices for repre- 
senting models at multiple resolutions: using a 
curved surface representation (such as NURBS or 
Quadrics), or using a multiresolution representa- 
tion. This session focuses on the relative merits of 
the two representations from a number of points of 
view including CPU, memory bandwidth and 
graphics adapter performance. In short, how the 
choice of representation affects graphics system 
performance. Obligatory demos are shown as well 
as hard performance numbers from live systems. 



Lecture 4407 

DATABASE DEVELOPMENT FOR 
REAL-TIME 3D GAMES: A VIEW 
FROM BOTH SIDES 

GJ0N CAMAJ 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
104 B, Convention Center 



3:30-4:30 



To successfully create believable visual databases 
for use in a real-time 3D game, both the database 
developer and the application designer must con- 
sider the many aspects of such a design. A data- 
base builder needs to maintain a balance between 
creative freedom and system reqL 
important issue is how to effecti\ 




a balance between 
?quirements. An 
tively tailor a visual 



database for maximum operational efficiency with- 
in a given image generation pipeline. An applica- 
tion designer has the responsibility of how best to 
engineer a system that allows world builders to 
create a visually pleasing database within the mini- 
mum restrictions. A good system must maintain a 
high frame rate while reducing design limitations 
and artifacts. Issues discussed include database 
optimization, subdivision, level-of-detail, culling, 
frame-to-frame coherence, commercial and propri- 
etary, and texture mapping. The terms database, 
real-time, and true 3D are defined. 

Intended for real-time 3D database architects, 
designers, and builders. 



Sponsored by 3354 

Metrowerks 

DEVELOPMENT TOOLS: 
SHINES & WHINES 

DAVID GILL 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 2:00-3:00 

202 A, Convention Center 

ALL 

This session is an open forum sponsored by 
Metrowerks, where game developers have the 
opportunity to discuss the pros and cons, likes and 
dislikes, the good, the bad, and the ugly of gaming 
development tools. Come hear more about devel- 
opment tools and avoid costly mistakes by learning 
from other developers' experiences. Come to 
unleash your fury, frenzy and rage on the current 
limitations of development tools and express your 
development tool wish list. Here's a chance to talk 
directly with decision makers at a leading tools 
company to get your gaming dreams realized! 



Sponsored by 

Microsoft 

DIRECTANIMATION 

PABLO FERNICOLA 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
202 C, Convention Center 

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE 



4552 



5:00-6:00 



DirectAnimation is the component of the DirectX 
family of APIs which provides rich animation and 
integrated media support for web pages, CD-ROM 
titles, and multimedia applications. DirectAnimation 
provides unified and comprehensive integration of 
different media types, including 2D vector graphics, 
3D objects, sprites, audio, and video. DirectAni- 
mation presents a rich time and event model that 
applies uniformly across all the different media 
types. DirectAnimation is a COM API and its under- 
lying engine/runtime can be accessed in different 



ways ranging from C++, to scripting for web pages, 
to VisualBasic, and Java. DirectAnimation was 
released as part of the Internet Explorer 4.0 core 
install and it is part of Windows 98 and Windows 
NT 5.0. 



Sponsored by 
Microsoft 

DIRECTSH0W 

KEVIN LARKIN 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
201 A, Convention Center 

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE 



3450 



3:30-4:30 



DirectShow is a member of the DirectX family of 
APIs that provides the services for the capture, 
editing and playback of multimedia content. 
DirectShow gives the application developer and 
content creator, easy to use APIs for processing 
streams of multimedia data. The developer has 
instant access to such media types as AVI, MPEG, 
MOV, WAV, ASF, RA and even DVD by using 
DirectShow with the application. DirectShow uses a 
configuration manager called a filtergraph to con- 
trol and process streams of time-stamped multime- 
dia data. This filtergraph can be accessed through 
either through C/C++, Visual Basic, or through 
scripting. This session provides an introduction and 
overview of the DirectShow architecture, including 
code walk-throughs and examples. 



Sponsored by 3355 

PowerVR 

DISPLAY LIST RENDERING 

MARC PINTER-KRAINER 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 2:00-3:00 

201 B, Convention Center 

BEGINNER 

This session gives the attendee a solid grasp of dis- 
play list rendering in general and covers the issues 
developers must keep in mind when programming 
for this type of platform. Display list rendering is 
the fundamental architecture for PowerVR. There 
are many inherent benefits of this type of approach 
including deferred texturing, on chip hidden sur- 
face removal, low memory bandwidth require- 
ments, tiling, and scaling. 



Sponsored by 5551 

S3 Incorporated 

EFFICIENT SYSTEM MEMORY 
TEXTURING ARCHITECTURE FOR 
GAMES 

JOHN BROTHERS & RAY K0DURI 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
202 B, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



S3 discusses a 3D architecture that maximizes the 
benefits of AGP texturing and provides for texture 
rich environments in next generation 3D games. 
This architecture combined with S3 Texture 
Compression (S3TC) cost-effectively increases 
available texture storage and read bandwidth by a 
factor of four to six. As Microsoft has selected 
S3TC as the standard compression technique for 
Microsoft DirectX 6.0, this is a must-see 
presentation. 



Lecture 3121 

ENGINE SCALABILITY AND 3D 
HARDWARE 

CHARLIE BROWN & GARY MCTAGGART 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

104 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11 :00 



This session focuses on the higher level aspects of 
optimizations for 3D hardware. Rather than focus- 
ing on code optimization, this session looks at 
ways to get the most of current and next genera- 
tion 3D hardware using a scalable engine.The lec- 
ture touches on geometry, material, and lighting 
scalability among other things. There is some relat- 
ed background discussion. 



5350 
Intel 

EXPLOITING PARALLELISM IN 3D 
GAMES USING A 
MULTITHREADED GAME 
APPLICATION FRAMEWORK 

FENGXIE 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

201 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



This course covers how to extract extra cycles out 
of CPUs to maximize the overall game performance 
using the Windows multithreading API. There are 
four major time consuming tasks in a 3D game 
application; data streaming, simulation, rendering 



I 



OMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 



J 




and sound. Based on the hardware platform con- 
figuration, these tasks may be parallel processed to 
take advantage of SMP machines and CPU cycles 
while disk or Internet streaming is performed, or 
while the graphics card is busy. Using a multithread 
game engine that supports automatic parallel pro- 
cessing of these four tasks as an example, this ses- 
sion covers first the challenges in designing a mul- 
tithread 3D game in order to minimize the data 
dependency between the threads or (processes). 
This is followed by a detailed discussion on the 
challenges in implementing a multithread 3D 
game, the cost and benefit tradeoffs between the 
different synchronization primitives (semaphores to 
critical section) and parallel processing models 
(threads to fibers) on the PC platform. 



Roundtable 3409/4215/5516 

GAME DEVELOPMENT USING 
ALTERNATIVE LANGUAGES 

KORY BRICKER 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency E, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency C, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency C, Hyatt 



3:30-4:30 



11:30-12:30 



5:00-6:00 



This roundtable explores imitations of the different 
languages, how they apply to game development 
and where to find resources for these languages. 
What is involved in using an alternative language 
for game development including: Which languages 
are best suited for a specific area? For example, 
which language is best for creating animations 7 
Which is best for creating database driven kiosks 
etc? This session is an open discussion of the prob- 
lems and concerns of using alternative languages. 

Intended for anyone looking for rapid application 
development using any language other than C++. 



Sponsored by 3152 

ATI Technologies 

GAMING AND MULTIMEDIA 
GRAPHICS ON WINDOWS CE: A 
CASE STUDY 

DAVID GOULD 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
202 B, Convention Center 



10:00-11:00 



Microsoft Windows CE is a small but powerful 32- 
bit, multitasking, multithreaded OS that supports 
a subset of the popular Win32 model. CE sup- 




ports well known standards, and because it is 
small, compact, scalable, customizable and runs 
in a diskless environment, it has quickly become a 
major force in the consumer industry for the 
development of low cost game consoles and set- 
top boxes. Leaders in the graphics industry, 
including ATI Technologies, are embracing 
Windows CE and actively developing set-top box 
reference designs. This session is a case study for 
software engineers and game companies who 
want to understand the issues of porting their 
games and multimedia applications to Windows 
CE. Topics covered include: Windows CE 
Overview; ATI's Windows CE Reference Design; 
case study of Windows CE Ports including drivers 
(2D, 3D, TV & DVD), PC game, multimedia appli- 
cations (TV & DVD); and demonstrations including 
3D games, Intelligent TV, and DVD 



Lecture 5404 

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF 3D 
ACCELERATORS 

GREG CORSON 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



This presentation goes over a number of tech- 
niques for producing 3D effects such as smoke, fire 
and explosions. It also covers some other useful 3D 
coding and art creation techniques that can 
enhance the appearance of both 3D games and 2D 
"sprite based" games by using 3D accelerators. 
There is some material on how to make art/code 
more portable to various 3D accelerator technolo- 
gies while still taking advantage of their special 
features. 

Intended for artists and programmers developing 
3D or 2D games who want some examples of creat- 
ing interesting visual effects using 3D accelerators 
and avoiding art/programming pitfalls that can 
make porting games to a variety of cards difficult. 
Prerequisite: Only a basic understanding of 3D pro- 
gramming or 3D art creation techniques is required. 



Lecture 4404 

HARDCORE Al FOR THE 
COMPUTER GAMES OF 
TOMORROW 

JOHN FUNGE 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 3:30-4:30 

104 A, Convention Center 



Intelligent characters in computer games are in 
high demand. In response, developers are drawing 
on Al techniques. Unfortunately, much of the 




required information is still locked up in academic 
journals. For techniques that deal with reasoning 
about changing worlds we have translated the 
important information into a more accessible form. 
The aim is to avoid wasted time by pointing out 
some of the common pitfalls and describing how to 
avoid them. Explanations make heavy use of exam- 
ples drawn from experience in developing a char- 
acter design workbench (CDW). CDW is a research 
tool designed to showcase some capabilities of 
tomorrow's rapid prototyping and game develop- 
ment tools. The user can design characters based 
on behavior outlines, or sketch plans. Many behav- . 
iors can be specified more naturally, more simply, 
more succinctly and at a much higher-level than 
would otherwise be possible. 



Lecture 3205 

HIGH COLOR, HIGH RES: 
GRAPHICS PROGRAMMING IN A 
NON-PALLETIZED WORLD 

WADE BRAINERD 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

Ballroom B, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



True color graphics, feasible to game developers for 
the first time thanks to the efforts of the VESA 
standards committee, Microsoft, hardware manu- 
facturers and others, offer a whole new range of 
possibilities to graphics programmers. The purpose 
of this session is to outline a few of them as they 
apply to software Tenderers. The techniques 
described were developed for an isometric Tender- 
er. However, all can be applied directly to RT3D. 
Specific topics to be covered include: Z-buffers to 
reduce memory bandwidth, real-time decompres- 
sion to reduce memory constraints, colored lighting 
effects, anti-aliasing of edges, and three kinds of 
translucency including dynamic variable level 
translucency. 

Intended for intermediate to advanced PC graphics 
programmers who currently use or are thinking 
about using high-resolution, true color graphics in 
their games. Also intended for graphics program- 
mers with an interest in new real-time rendering 
techniques. 



Lecture 4405 

HIGH PERFORMANCE GAME 
PROGRAMMING IN C++ 

PAUL PEDRIANA 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Ballroom A, Convention Center 



3:30-4:30 



INTERMEDIATE 

Is C++ a viable language for high performance 





games? Absolutely, if you know which features to 
use and which ones to avoid. Unfortunately, the 
cost of these features is not obvious from the lan- 
guage syntax and often requires years of experi- 
ence to understand. This session looks at each of 
these primary C++ features and discuss their per- 
formance and memory effects in detail. Topics cov- 
ered include: classes, memory allocation, inlining, 
RTTI, strings, streams, exception handling, tem- 
plates, STL, and more. For each topic, code is ana- 
lyzed and benchmark results are shown. Source 
code to the Zen C++ timer is provided as well. At 
the end this lecture examines a few wizard's tricks, 
such as hijacking the vtable. Attendees come away 
from this lecture confident in writing C++ code 
that will be just as fast as C, and maybe even 
faster. 

This lecture is intended for C and C++ game pro- 
grammers who need to write highly effecient code 
and would use C++ more if they were convinced it 
was as fast and efficient as C. 

Attendees should have a good knowledge of C and 
at least some basic knowledge of C++. Some famil- 
iarity with assembly is also useful, though not 
required. 



Lecture 3306 

HOW SHADOWS OF THE EMPIRE 
USED THE FORCE 

GARYBRUBAKER 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 2:00-3:00 

102 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

Force feedback can create a strong immersive 
experience and communicate extra information to 
a player, or become extremely annoying. There are 
various implementations for force feedback, which 
have advantages, limitations, and support of 
devices for Windows 95. As an early force feedback 
game, Shadows of the Empire used a technique 
that was easy to add to an existing title, flexible 
and widely compatible. The lessons learned from 
adding force feedback to Shadows of the Empire 
was that many effects, while very nice, detracted 
from gameplay and despite sophisticated tools, 
programming straight to Directlnput offered the 
best solution. Come hear war stories about the 
mistakes we made. Actual working code samples 
with explanations cover the necessary topics to get 
basic force feedback into a game. If you want to 
add force feedback to your title, this code is an 
easy way to get a jump on the fairly steep learning 
curve. This lecture is primarily for programmers 
wanting to add force feedback support to a 
upcoming title. Parts would also be interesting to 
game designers on experiences which can be 
added to a title with force feedback. 

Prerequisites: C/C++ programming and basic knowl- 
edge of DirectX for code samples. 



Lecture 

HOW 'BOUT DEM BONES: 
CREATING A BONES-BASED 
ANIMATION SYSTEM 

ANDREW LUNSTAD 



3106 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
101 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



The importance of realistic animation in immersive 
3D games is growing more important every year. 
Realistic animation requires both variety and 
smoothness of movement, which means lots of 
frames, taking up lots of memory. With 3D acceler- 
ators driving up the polygon count of characters, 
the importance of compressing the animation data 
grows even more important. One technique of 
compressing this data is the use of bones. A bone 
is simply a way to group vertices that have similar 
or identical movement. For example, all the vertices 
in a helmet will move together - connected by the 
head bone. This lecture describes how to identify 
bones (groups of vertices), how to derive the trans- 
forms necessary to use them, and discusses other 
options and optimizations while providing real- 
world examples from Fenris Wolf's upcoming 
release Revolution. 

Intended for programmers creating 3D content. 

Prerequisite: Attendees should be programmers who 
have a basic understanding of 3D mathematics. 



Sponsored by 4550 

Intel 

IMPROVING GRAPHICS 
PERFORMANCE USING IPEAK 

HERB MARSALAS 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
201 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



5:00-6:00 



Improving accelerated 3D graphics performance 
requires understanding the performance potential 
of the application and the graphics accelerator, as 
well as the graphics workload driven by the appli- 
cation. This session deconstructs some lucky devel- 
oper's game and sees how well they are utilizing 
the power available in the 3D graphics pipeline as 
well as discussing where improvements could be 
made, and common problems. 



Sponsored by 5150 

Intel 

INTEL740 GRAPHICS 
ACCELERATOR PERFORMANCE 
TUNING 

THEODORE 0MTZIGTE & JAY STURGES 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

201 A, Convention Center 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

201 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11 :00 



11:30-12:30 



This class introduces the power and capabilities of 
the Intel740 graphics accelerator. It begins by provid- 
ing an overview of the architecture and a description 
of the AGP and local memory interfaces. This leads 
to a discussion of texturing directly from AGP (DME), 
achieving per-pixel accuracy and quality, and imple- 
menting "special effects" (animated textures and 
colorkeyed/chromakeyed images). This session also 
shows how to predict and maximize a title's perfor- 
mance and get better frame rates. It gives a set of 
unique tools for monitoring performance and identi- 
fying graphics sub-system bottlenecks. Find out 
about counters for probing key areas like bus utiliza- 
tion and the 3D pipeline. Also find out what events 
are monitored in the chip set and how to tune the 
application for the graphics sub-system. A real-life 
case study is used. Class attendees will find out how 
to get a free Intel740 graphics accelerator card and a 
copy of the SDK. 



Seminar 

LIES, DAMN LIES, AND ASR 
STATISTICS: A VOICE 
PROCESSING PRIMER 

NEIL KIRBY 



5105 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11 :00 



The goal of this seminar is to give you the informa- 
tion you need to separate technical data from mar- 
keting hype. It makes it easier for you to answer 
the question, "Is it time for voice processing in our 
games?" And it gives you some hard questions to 
ask vendors about their products. The topics cov- 
ered include: basic voice processing technologies; 
automatic speech recognition, text-to-speech, voice 
playback, and speaker verification. The bulk of the 
seminar is deals with recognition, since it appears 
to be the least understood and most valuable 
topic. 

Intended for technical people who want to learn 
some basics about voice processing and managers 
who need to be able to make decisions about voice 
processing in new titles. 



. 




OMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 





'/ 



Sponsored by 3260 

Caligari 

LOW COST 3D GRAPHICS FOR 
INDEPENDENT GAME 
DEVELOPERS 

CALIGARI 



WEDSDAY, MAY 6 

202 B, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



You don't have to spend thousands of dollars on a 
professional 3D package and then thousands more 
for the obligatory plug-ins to get top-quality 3D 
graphics for game development. This seminar 
shows how to use low-cost, next-generation 3D 
software tools that take advantage of the latest 3D 
hardware acceleration technology for rapid game 
prototyping and how to create compelling 3D envi- 
ronments and believable 3D characters. This ses- 
sion provides excellent information for budget-con- 
scious independent developers. 



Lecture 4106 

MAKING THE PLAY: TEAM 
COOPERATION IN MICROSOFT 
BASEBALL 3D 

STEVE RABIN 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
101 B, Convention Center 



10:00-11:00 



Sponsored by 3153/4352 

Interactive Visual Systems 

MAXIMIZING REAL-TIME GAME 
PERFORMANCE 

ROBERT "DWANG0 BOB" HUNTLEY 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 10:00-11:00 

202 C, Convention Center 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 2:00-3:00 

202 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

This is a comparison of latency and performance 
across various Internet and intranet architectures. 
Delivering a true real-time game experience 
requires a low latency solution that can consistent- 
ly deliver immediate responses to a number of par- 
ticipants. The ability to host multiplayer perfor- 
mance without compromising requisite fast-twitch 
response is difficult to maintain within current 
Internet architecture. This session addresses the 
realities of achieving high quality real-time game 
performance. It discusses the variability in game 
performance across a variety of architectures and 
presents the utilization of DirectPlay applications in 
maximizing performance and, in turn, the player's 
game experience. Specific discussions examine the 
effects of Internet architecture on fast-twitch per- 
formance with regard to bandwidth and trafficking 
of information as well as inconsistency across 
Internet service providers. The achievement of low 
latency through reducing traffic, packet size and 
amount of data transmitted is discussed. 



complete the task, avoiding collision with the envi- 
ronment and with other actors. Dynamic event- 
based programming is a framework for scripting 
the sophisticated logic of Intelligent Digital Actors. 
Based on an elegant hierarchical finite state 
machine model, this system is specifically tailored 
to manage complex real-time character interaction. 



Lecture 5106 

MULTIPLAYER GAME 
DEVELOPMENT: NETWORKING 
SIMCITY 

JASON SHANKEL 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Ballroom A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



There are many pitfalls and traps involved in 
designing and implementing multiplayer computer 
games. These pitfalls can often be amplified when 
legacy single-player games are converted to multi- 
player. This lecture provides helpful hints and prac- 
tical examples for programmers and designers of 
multiplayer games, drawing from our experience in 
designing network games based on SimCity. 
Examples are drawn from experiences creating 
multiplayer games based on SimCity. Specific 
attention is paid to issues raised by bringing single- 
player legacy games, such as SimCity and 
Civilization, into the multiplayer world. 



Imagine that you're designing a game that has 
multiple Al characters. As it turns out, these charac- 
ters must work together to achieve a common 
goal. They might be fighting a war, battling a horde 
of monsters, or even playing a baseball game. 
You've got a pretty good idea how they should act 
individually, but how should they cooperate? This 
talk explores multiple ways to deal with coopera- 
tion, exploring the pros and cons of each. Each 
method is related to a real project, Microsoft 
Baseball 3D, and how it impacted the design. The 
session ends with a detailed algorithm that works 
extremely well for the game of baseball and no 
doubt endless other applications. 

Intended for anyone who is working on a title that 
requires the cooperation of multiple Al characters. 

Prerequisites: It is advised that the attendees have 
some rudimentary experience trying to program Al 
characters in a real-time setting, but it is not 
required. 



4150 



Sponsored by 
The Motion Factory 

MOTIVATE -INTELLIGENT DIGITAL 
ACTOR SYSTEM 

Y0TT0 K0GA 



4353 Intel 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

202 C, Convention Center 



2:00-3:00 



t 



The Motion Factory believes that the next genera- 
tion of 3D titles will be defined by richer, more 
compelling character interaction. To enable this 
breakthrough, we have developed the Motivate 
Intelligent Digital Actor System - a platform for cre- 
ating characters that move, behave and interact 
with incredible richness and variety. Motivate inte- 
grates two cutting-edge technologies: real-time 
motion synthesis and dynamic event-based behav- 
ior programming. Real-time motion synthesis 
enables Intelligent Digital Actors to generate ani- 
mation on the fly, in response to a dynamically 
changing environment. For example, an actor com- 
manded to "go there" or "pick up that object" 
automatically generates the animation required to 



MULTIRES0LUTI0N MESHES: A 
SOLUTION FOR CREATING 
SCALABLE 3D GAMES 

STEPHEN JUNKINS 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

201 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



A multiresolution mesh is a representation of a 3D 
model that can dynamically adjust its geometric 
complexity. This technology frees artists from per- 
formance considerations, requiring them to author 
content only once at the highest level of detail and 
it enables developers to dynamically adjust the 
content's resolution when rendering. Developers 
may choose to adjust resolution based on run time 
parameters such as frame rate, viewing distance, 
and scene complexity. Thus a single game exe- 
cutable is empowered to exploit the performance 
of emerging platforms while remaining competitive 
on an installed base of platforms. This session pre- 
sents algorithms that produce multiresolution 
meshes and techniques for their integration into 







existing authoring tools and custom rendering 
pipelines. 



Lecture 4206 

NATURAL LANGUAGE 
PROCESSING IN 55 MINUTES OR 
LESS 

JOHN O'NEIL 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

101 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



Although one of the original categories of comput- 
er games, text-based adventure games, is intrinsi- 
cally linked to processing natural language, many 
recent computer games have moved away from 
their progenitors and use little or no language pro- 
cessing at all. There is a good reason for this: the 
limits of the language processing technology used 
in the text-adventure games of the 1980's were 
quickly reached, and could not be scaled up to 
meet the increased expectations of players for larg- 
er and better games. However, natural language 
processing has moved far beyond the techniques 
used in those early games. This lecture is an intro- 
duction to natural language processing, and its 
implementation and use in games. It concentrates 
on three areas: syntax, semantics and 
discourse/pragmatics. This session also addresses 
problems posed by each of these areas, and pre- 
sents algorithms for solving them. 

Intended for people who have some familiarity (not 
necessarily programming experience) with text- 
based games and how they work. 



Lecture 5117 

NEXT GENERATION BSP TREES 

BRUCE NAYLOR 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 A, Convention Center 



10:00-11 :00 



BSP Trees provide the fundamental computational 
representation of 3D space used in many of todays 
hit games, including Doom, Quake, and Hexen. This 
session focuses on capabilties that have yet to be 
incorporated into any of these games, such as 
modifiable solid geometry for such effects as blow- 
ing holes and drilling tunnels, as well as x-ray 
vision and transparent force-fields that allow you 
to walk though solid objects. These features are all 
based on dynamic BSP Trees. This lecture also dis- 
cusses how dynamic BSP Trees can provide accu- 
rate collision detection at rates faster than other 
methods. The presentation provides a clear under- 
standing of BSP Tree fundamentals, how to build 
solids, how dynamic BSP trees work, and what con- 



F 



stitutes "good" BSP Trees that are critical to 
achieving high performance. 



Lecture 4306 

NEXT GENERATION EFFECTS 
USING MULTI-TEXTURE, MULTI- 
PASS TRIANGLES 

DAVID KIRK 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Ballroom B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 



This sessions discuss how to use multiple rendering 
layers to generate stunning next-generation effects. 
Current PC 3D acceleration hardware has enough 
blended, z-buffered pixel fill rate and overdraw 
horsepower to create great effects by multiple 
draws per pixel. This session explores multiple tex- 
tures per triangle, multiple passes of rendering 
overlaid on the same triangle, and multiple blend- 
ed and transparent geometry layers. These tech- 
niques can be used to generate effects such as 
dynamic lighting, complex highlights, reflections 
and environmental reflections, bump-mapping, 
rough surfaces, and more. Underwater and atmos- 
pheric effects can also be created using multiple 
textures and multipass rendering. 

Intended for anyone responsible for developing 
next generation 3D games for Microsoft's Direct3D 
API. Multi-platform developers are also encouraged 
to attend as they develop internal 3D graphics 
engines that must be portable to support multiple 
hardware and software interfaces. 



Sponsored by 3150 

NVIDIA 

OPTIMIZING 3D PERFORMANCE 
WITH DIRECT3D 

DAVID KIRK 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

201 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



This session discusses how to program Direct3D 
games to maximize performance and quality on 
today's and tomorrow's advanced 3D hardware. 
Direct3D is a powerful API in that it allows a game 
developer to create games for multiple hardware 
platforms with little porting effort. Nonetheless, in 
order to achieve maximum performance (polygon 
draw rate, fill rate, resolution and frame rate), the 
programmer needs to be aware of what's happen- 
ing under the hood. This session explores the cost 
of various operations and primitive types in 
Direct3D, and how to create scaleable geometry 
and rendering, and how to use Direct3D to get the 
most performance, on any processor and hardware. 



OMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 



GAME DEVEL0PE 




Intended for anyone responsible for developing 
next generation 3D games for Microsoft's Direct3D 
API. Multi-platform developers are also encouraged 
to attend as they develop internal 3D graphics 
engines that must be portable to support multiple 
hardware and software interfaces. 



Sponsored by 5452 

Real 3D 

OPTIMIZING GAMES FOR THE 
REAL 3D STARFIGHTER WITH 
INTEL740 

HADDEN H0PPERT, JEFF POTTER 
& ANDY THOMPSON 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

202 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



The lnte!740 arrived with a splash this last 
February, bringing the promise of 3D graphics for 
the masses. Real 3D, the co-developer of the 3D 
rendering pipeline, presents this session for game 
developers and programmers to learn about the 
incredible power and rich features of this new chip. 
Attendees learn how to tap these features to cre- 
ate games of uncompromising depth and richness, 
previously impossible on consumer systems. 



Sponsored by 4350 

Intel 

PERFORMANCE TUNING FOR 
PENTIUM II PROCESSORS WITH 
VTUNE3.0 

GARY CARLET0N 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

201 A, Convention Center 



2:00-3:00 



BtblNNtrW IN 



This session uses VTune, Intel's Visual Performance 
Tuning tool, to tune an application for the Pentium 
II processor. During the session some of the most 
common performance issues for the Pentium II 
processor are discussed. VTune is used to find the 
app's performance hotspots, get advice on modify- 
ing the program (for both assembly and high level 
language), and look at CPU issues for the program. 
Compiler issues are also discussed, after which the 
app is be rebuilt and rerun. 




# 



Lecture 5505 

PHYSICAL MODELING FOR 
GAMES 

MICHAEL SHANTZ 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 5:00-6:00 

Ballroom B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED 

There is general agreement in the industry that 
physically based modeling will become more and 
more prevalent in games of the future. We have 
implemented the structurally recursive forward 
dynamics algorithm for articulated bodies as an 
extension to a game engine based on an object 
oriented scene manager. The method allows for 
systems with kinematic loop constraints which can 
be used to simulate mechanisms and special 
effects such as structural disintegration. We use a 
spring damper method to correct for the gradual 
drift in the constrained directions due to integrator 
error. Optimizations include tuning the underlying 
linear algebra and matrix package, grouping matrix 
storage for efficient memory access on Intel plat- 
forms, multithreading for parallel behaviors, adap- 
tive stepsize integrators, behavioral level of detail, 
and efficient collision detection based on the ori- 
ented bounding box (OBB) algorithm. This session 
discusses issues on dynamically restructuring the 
articulated connections for special effects. A real- 
time toy steam engine example is shown. 

Intended for game designers and programmers hav- 
ing some C++ and matrix algebra knowledge who 
want to learn more about some of the techniques 
and problems associated with physical modeling of 
mechanisms and characters in a real time environ- 
ment. 

Prerequisite: It is advised that attendees have a 
general working knowledge of game engines or 
scene managers, some linear algebra, and some 
actual development experience with animation, 
motion capture, or articulated body dynamics. 
References and pointers will be given for program- 
mers interested in getting started in physical mod- 
eling of characters. 



Seminar 5317 

PHYSICS Q&A 

CHRIS HECKER& DAVID WU 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 2:00-3:00 

Ballroom A, Convention Center 



If the number of physics lectures submitted and 
accepted to this year's CGDC is any indication, 
games are getting serious about dynamic physical 
simulation. So, instead of yet another physics lec- 
ture, this session provides a place to discuss the 
algorithms and ideas and to ask (and maybe hear 
answers to) questions about implementing real 



physics in computer games in 1998. Can current 
CPUs really handle large linear systems? Why are 
my objects spinning off into the Land of NaN? 
Which contact algorithms really work with stacking 
objects? The moderators bring the overhead pro- 
jector, the transparencies, some introductory words 
of wisdom, and maybe a demo or two. Attendees 
bring real-world questions and war stories, paper 
and pencil to work the math problems posed, 
aspirin, and an open mind. 



Lecture 5217 

PORTING FLIGHT SIM '98 TO 
DIRECT3D: DRAGGING A 15 YEAR 
OLD GRAPHICS ENGINE INTO 
THE 90S 

TODD LANEY 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



Upgrading the popular Microsoft Flight Simulator 
and its venerable rendering engine to use 3D hard- 
ware was quite an adventure. Problems turned up 
along the way relating to performance, compatibili- 
ty, and engine design — problems that are familiar 
to others writing games for 3D hardware, and 
especially those porting engines designed for soft- 
ware rendering. This session details the problems 
and solutions, and then discusses what changes 
will be made to the 3D engine to better accomo- 
date hardware acceleration in the future. 



Sponsored by 3155/5155 

PowerVR 

P0WERVR II TECHNOLOGY 
OVERVIEW 



JOHN SMITH 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

201 B, Convention Center 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

201 B, Convention Center 



10:00-11 :00 
10:00-11 :00 



This session is an overview of PowerVR's second 
generation architecture which is used from con- 
soles to PCs. The discussion gives a quick overview 
of the fundamental architecture, highlight differ- 
ences between the first and second generation 
hardware and the specificfeatures and benefits 
associated with this new technology. There are 
many very useful features including hardware 
bump mapping, texture compression, and modifier 
volumes which are also explored. 



Sponsored by 4250 

Intel 

PROGRAMMING FOR PC-BASED 
C0IN-0P AND ARCADE GAMES 

MARK ATKINS 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
201 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



Many great new video games in arcades in the 
near future will have PCs inside. They will run 
Windows 9x with DirectX on high-MHz Pentium II 
processors with AGP 3D graphics and loads of 
RAM. These machines will need to handle debit 
cards, coins, bills, and esoteric devices like motion 
chairs. This session discusses the extra needs and 
opportunities for programming for arcade, includ- 
ing dual processor machines. We also discuss 
gameplay differences between the arcade and 
home, and answer the question, "How much work 
is it to convert a home app to arcade (or visa 
versa)?" 



4251 
3Dtx Interactive 

PROGRAMMING WITH GLIDE 

3Dfx INTERACTIVE 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

202 B, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



Come and learn about the industry's leading high 
performance, direct to the hardware API for 
Voodoo based products. Take advantage of all the 
features of Voodoo 2 with multi-texturing, triangle 
strips and fans, multitudes of texture and blending 
modes, and everything else needed to make your 
content a showcase piece. 3Dfx engineers explain 
the basic and advanced ways of programming 
Glide with ample use of source code and sample 
applications. 



Lecture 3405 

PROJECT Al 

MARK BALDWIN 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 3:30-4:30 

Ballroom B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

Developing Al (artificial intelligence) and artificial 
opponents for computer games has always been an 
art more than a science. But certain techniques are 
still applicable to the problems involved. This session 
presents information about Project Al, a methodolo- 
gy/technique of Al design. Project Al has been devel- 







oped and improved by the author over the years, 
and has been used in a number of games including 
The Perfect General, Empire Deluxe and Empire II. 
Project Al is a method of developing 'projects' from 
which the game Al can make intelligent decisions. 
It's primary asset is the ability to coordinate diver- 
gent resources to solve specific problems presented 
to the Al. The session presents some basic methods 
of Al techniques, then progress on to the more spe- 
cific techniques required using Project Al. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

CGDC CLASSES 



Roundtable 3319/3417/4117 

4415/5215/5315 

Q&A ROUNDTABLE: OPTIMIZING 
FOR PENTIUM II PROCESSOR 
PLATFORMS 

MEHMET ADALIER, PETER BAKER, HAIM BARAD, 
MICHAEL JULIER, KIM PALLISTERM, 
& JAY STURGES 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 


WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency D, Hyatt 


3:30-4:30 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency D, Hyatt 


10:00-11:00 


THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency C, Hyatt 


3:30-4:30 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 


11:30-12:30 


FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 


2:00-3:00 



ADVANCED 

This question and answer roundtable session 
between Intel processor architects, technical engi- 
neers, and the game development community 
focuses on code optimization and use of perfor- 
mance design tools such as Vtune. Intel personnel 
discuss the latest issues in programming for the 
Pentium II processor including optimizing tech- 
niques, coding practices for high performance code, 
instruction decomposition, and flow through the 
Pentium II processor. 



F 



Lecture 4205 

QUAKE II: A STUDY IN USING 
0PENGL AND HARDWARE 
ACCELERATION FOR THE PC 
PLATFORM 

BRIAN HOOK 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Ballroom A, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



This lecture discusses some of the issues, problems, 
and solutions that arose when deploying Quake2 
with OpenGL support. Topics discussed include 
how OpenGL was used, dealing with driver bugs, 
interfacing with hardware vendors, and various 
other esoterica centered around shipping a com- 
mercial application using the OpenGL graphics API 
for hardware acceleration. 

Recommended for intermediate to advanced graph- 
ics programmers. 



Sponsored by 4450 

Intel 

REAL-TIME PROCEDURAL 
TEXTURING 

HAIM BARAD 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 3:30-4:30 

201 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

This session shows how procedural texturing 
optimized for MMX technology can be used for 
real-time 3D graphics. This session describes how 
to generate a variety of natural-looking patterns, 
such as water, stars, grass, wood, and marble, 
using a mathematical technique called fractional 
Brownian motion. Procedural texturing requires 
much less bandwidth than the traditional image- 
mapping implemented in hardware accelerators. 
This session also illustrates displacement map- 
ping on the object to create objects of different 
shape by displacing the surface. The session 
includes a demo and full sources of the demo are 
available. 



Roundtable 3422/4516/5517 

SCALABLE GEOMETRY 

J0HNTALLEY 

3:30-4:30 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Regency D, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency D, Hyatt 



5:00-6:00 



5:00-6:00 



INTERMEDIATE 

There is a wide range in processor and 3D acceler- 
ator power available today. This range seems to be 
widening in the future, making scalable geometry 
almost a necessity for an "A" title in development 
today. This roundtable discusses the benefits and 
difficulties of developing and using scalable geom- 
etry methods. Topics covered include 
splines/NURBS, polygonal subdivision, progressive 
meshes and other multi-resolution methods and 
where and why scalable geometry should be used. 

Recommended for programmers who are or will be 
developing scalable geometry systems and artists 
who will be producing the art used by these systems. 

Prerequisite: An understanding of 3D geometry and 
graphics from the programmer and/or artists point 
of view is necessary. 



Roundtable 3309/4216/5116 

SIMULATING HUMAN 
OPPONENTS IN ACTION GAMES 

JOHN GRISBY 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency F, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 

Regency D, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency C, Hyatt 

ADVANCED 



2:00-3:00 



11:30-12:30 



10:00-11:00 



Many popular action games are fundamentally 
competitive in nature. This is especially true for 
arcade (and arcade-style) games. Since human 
opponents are not always available, the program- 
mer must provide surrogate opponents over a 
wide range of difficulty levels. This roundtable 
explores programming issues related to the simu- 
lation of human opponents in action arcade-type 
games. Fighting, driving, and vehicular combat 
games are the most obvious candidates, but any 
game involving continuous and direct control of 
your player surrogate (as opposed to Warcraft 
/Populous-style manipulation of semi-autonomous 
hordes, or turn-based combat) is discussed. 

Prerequisite: Attendees must have programmed (or 
be involved in programming) action-based titles 
which require simulation of human opponents. 



OMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




Lecture 5306 

STATE OF THE ART IN 3D REAL- 
TIME CHARACTERS 

JEFF LANDER 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

104 C, Convention Center 

ADVANCED 



2:00-3:00 



The criterion for art, programming and design of 
real-time 3D characters is rapidly evolving. The 
proliferation of 3D hardware has changed the 
overall notion of what developers and users alike 
can expect from their products. As these stan- 
dards become established in gaming, the empha- 
sis shifts from low level topics like scan conver- 
sion and texture mapping. This hardware boost 
harvests an ability to explore new topics in 3D 
character animation and design which before now 
were accessible only to academia and high end 
special effects companies. However this new free- 
dom creates an abundance of options from which 
the developer must decide. The programmer must 
address these alternatives early on to clarify the 
most appropriate uses, as well as any potential 
uses, of the growing technology. Areas of neces- 
sary exploration include: motion capture, realtime 
skipping of skeletons, motion blending, I.K., colli- 
sion detection, level of detail management, mesh 
deformation, realtime tesselation, and dynamics. 

The lecture is intended for experienced game pro- 
grammmers who are designing the next generation 
of character based games. 

Prerequisites: Strong familiarity with 3D graphics 
programming techniques. 



Sponsored by 3352 

Immersion 

THE ART OF FORCE FEEDBACK: 
ADDING REALISM TO YOUR 
APPLICATIONS USING FORCE 
FEEDBACK STICKS, WHEELS, 
AND MICE 

DEAN CHANG 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
202 B, Convention Center 



2:00-3:00 



f 



Force feedback is a new technology that lets you 
FEEL your software by incorporating actuators 
within interface peripherals such as joysticks, 
steering wheels, flight yokes, and mice. The actua- 
tors give these peripherals the power to push back 
on the user and create an application that is much 
more immersive than graphics and sound could 
achieve alone. This session covers all aspects of 
the art of force feedback game development. It 
provides an overview of the industry standard 



DirectX Directlnput force feedback API as well as 
an overview of the force feedback hardware avail- 
able. Designing truly compelling feel sensations is 
a creative process, and tools which complement 
DX have been developed to aid developers 
achieve this end. These tools are discussed and 
demonstrated. Finally, the future direction of force 
feedback in DX and new emerging hardware tech- 
nologies is presented. 

Intended for anyone interested in adding realistic 
feel sensations to their applications. 

Prerequisites: Knowledge of Directlnput API useful, 
but not required. 



Lecture 3206 

THE PHYSICS OF BASEBALL 3D 

MIGUEL GOMEZ 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
102 B/C, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



This discussion covers in technical detail how we 
tried to simulate the flight, bounce, roll and hit of a 
baseball as realistically as possible for Microsoft 
Baseball 3D. Explained are the forces exerted on a 
baseball in flight and when rolling, as well as the 
physics of the collisions modeled. The 3-point 
quadrature method of integrating differential equa- 
tions is covered briefly, and the techical reasons 
why it was chosen for use instead of a single-step 
method is explained. 

Prerequisites: A good understanding of basic 
Newtonian physics, vector calculus. Familiarity of 
differential equations is recommended. 



Sponsored by 3255/5255 

PowerVR 

TIPS & TRICKS OF POWERVR'S 
FIRST & SECOND GENERATION 

KEVIN KRALIAN 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
201 B, Convention Center 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

201 B, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



This session highlights game developers' experi- 
ences with PowerVR's first and second generation 
platforms. The discussion focuses on the issues they 
each faced when supporting the platform, how 
they got around them and also how they are tak- 
ing advantage of some of the features available in 
the second generation hardware. The panel 
includes representatives from many of the larger 
development houses including Gremlin, Kalisto, Ion 
Storm, Acclaim, and others. 



Roundtable 3109/4416/5316 

TORCHING FAHRENHEIT 

J0NGWINNER 

10:00-11 :00 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency D, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency C, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



2:00-3:00 



We've all heard the complaints and pounded our 
heads against the wall with current 3D APIs. It's 
not just the API; the hardware can be frustrating as 
well. Boards that support features but not at the 
same time, boards that mysteriously start doing 
software rendering so our frame rates fall faster 
than our game profitability. This has to stop! This 
roundtable discusses all the strengths and weak- 
nesses of current 3D APIs, including Direct3D, 
OpenGL, and others as necessary, as well as major 
3D hardware issues. Attendees discuss solutions, 
and prepare a recommendation for the hardware 
and software features developers need to build 
games for the next millennium. From the 
Fahrenheit press announcement, we know that 
OpenGL and DirectDraw3D will 'blend' in the 
future. Come discuss what features programmers 
and artists need in Fahrenheit to make thier games 
burn. 

Prerequisite: Direct3D or OpenGL experience. 



Sponsored by 3455 

PowerVR 

VECTOR QUANTIZATION TEXTURE 
COMPRESSION, HARDWARE 
BUMP MAPPING, AND 
GENERALIZED MODIFIER 
VOLUMES 

MARK BUTLER 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
201 B, Convention Center 



3:30-4:30 



11:30-12:30 



This session discusses three 3D specific features 
including vector quantization texture compression 
(providing up to 8:1 compression), full hardware 
bump mapping, and a technique called generalized 
modifier volumes which allows the developer to 
create effects from real-time shadows, head lights, 
to cloaking techniques and more. 







Sponsored by 5450 

Intel 

TRIANGLE STRIP GENERATION 
FOR REAL-TIME 3D GAMES 

MICHAEL ROSENZWEIG 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

201 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



Triangle strips are a graphics rendering primitive 
(available in OpenGL and D3D) that groups the 
vertices of adjacent triangles into arbitrarily long 
strips. Triangle strips are advantageous in real-time 
3D games for their highly efficient representation 
of triangle based geometry. However, 3D content 
authoring tools do not widely support triangle strip 
generation. Optimal triangle stripification for an 
arbitrary model is a NP-Complete problem and 
much of the possible throughput suffers from run 
time issues such as view orientation, hardware 
caching, and API overhead. This session presents 
new heuristics to produce high quality triangle 
strips for arbitrary models and related geometry 
pipeline optimizations that yield substantial 
, increase in geometry throughput. 



CURRENT AND 
FUTURE INFO ON 

THE WEB @ 
WWW.C6DC.COM 



Sponsored by 3451 

vr*i Inc. 

VR«1 CONDUCTOR: CREATING A 
STANDARD TECHNOLOGY 
PLATFORM FOR ONLINE GAMING 

MARK VANGE 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
202 B, Convention Center 



3:30-4:30 



This lecture introduces VR« 1 Conductor? as a means 
of creating a standard technology platform to devel- 
op and deliver online games. The benefits of such 
standardization are clear. For developers, a standard 
platform speeds up the process of creating online 
games, allowing more energies to be focused on 



game design instead of technology, and enable 
worldwide distribution. For network providers, it 
would decrease the time spent integrating a game 
created with a standardized SDK. Further, the 
provider would not need to employ and train a team 
of "experts" for each new proprietary technology it 
integrates into its system. Overall, a standard tech- 
nology platform allows the creation and delivery of 
online games to be faster and more cost effective, 
and helps grow the industry. Attendees receive a 
complimentary version of the VR« 1 Conductor? SDK. 

Intended for CD-ROM and online-only game devel- 
opers; ISPs/OSPs; online gaming networks; and 
online content aggregators. 



Computer Game 
Developers' Conference 

We're heading back north! 
Mark your calendars for 1999. 

Conference: March 15-19 
Expo: March 16-18 

San Jose Convention Center 
San Jose, CA 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Where Games Are Born 



Use Game 
Developer 




CLASSIC CONFERENCE 




SESSIONS 



VISUAL ARTS 

KEYNOTE 




CYRUS LUM 

THE NEED FOR RENAISSANCE MEN AND 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 10:00-11:00 

Artists need to be encouraged and given opportuni- 
ties to participate in the growth of graphic and game 
technology - experimenting, discovering and even 
inventing. The idea of artists, breaking the bounds of 
their current discipline and spilling out onto others, is 
not so far fetched. With the emergence of easy to use 
scripting languages becoming a part of all 3D pack- 
ages and the ability to use pre-existing game engines 
to quickly prototype game ideas and designs, artists 
have the "vehicle" in which to expand their abilities, 
and their toolsets. Imagine, as an artist, being able to 
add that extra feature to your favorite 3D program or 
fix a problem with the interface through scripting. 
Imagine, as a contract artist, creating custom tools, 
making you unique in a world were others just use 
generic, built-in functions or settings. Imagine your 
colleagues valuing your game ideas by showing them 
a prototype or an interactive sample. Taking advan- 
tage of these tools allows artists to gain not only 
more influence within the game industry, but also 
more respect. We explore how the artists can find and 
use these new tools. What information and learning 
resources are available to artists to allow them to 
achieve their goals? What kind of role can an artist 



WOMEN IN THIS DIGITAL AGE OF ART 
104 B, CONVENTION CENTER 

with these abilities have inside of a company? And 
finally, what is the value of these artists to the game 
industry? 

Cyrus Lum has been an artist in the computer game industry for 
nine years. He got his start at Strategic Simulations Inc., creating 
computer artwork for games based on the Advanced Dungeons 
and Dragons license. After four years at SSI, Cyrus moved on to 
Crystal Dynamics Inc., a small company of five people dedicated 
to supporting a new emerging game system called The 3DO. 
Cyrus founded Crystal's art department and served as the lead 
artist. His work can be seen in such game products as Crash 'n 
Burn, Total Eclipse, and The Horde. Two years later, Cyrus 
packed up and left California for Texas and Iguana 
Entertainment Inc. There, he founded the advanced technology 
group which handles Acclaim Studio's high-end rendering, and 
animation for games. After a year, the department had grown 
from one person to 15 people, all trained to take advantage of 
the cutting edge technology in computer graphics. Cyrus cur- 
rently serves as the executive director of advanced technologies 
for Acclaim Studios where he now coordinates the advanced 3D 
graphic efforts of Iguana Entertainment - Austin, Iguana 
Entertainment - Salt Lake City, Iguana Entertainment - UK, and 
Probe Entertainment. 



«B8 





ll 



Lecture 

THE ART OF LOW-POLY 

PAUL STEED 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
104 B, Convention Center 



3325 tr ' c ' <5 ar| d perhaps come away with the answer to 
that one problem you've been plagued with for 
months. 



2:00-3:00 



This session is an exploration of how to create, 
optimize and animate low-polygon models. Using 
examples from work done for Quake II, detailed 
tips, tricks and techniques are covered. Learn to be 
frugal with your face-count regardless the 
demands of your given scene. Also learn how to 
use these low-poly techniques to come up with 
'digital storyboards', allowing you to quickly work 
out animation problems or show someone else 
what you want to do. These ideas can work with 
nearly any modeling or animation package. 



Lecture 4302 

ART SKILLS TO PRODUCE 
SUPERIOR FIGURATIVE GAME 
ART 

DON SEEGMILLER 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

102 A, Convention Center 



2:00-3:00 



Figurative art in games is usually significantly less 
refined than the non figurative elements. This ses- 
sion explores what is lacking and what can be 
done to improve the work. Hear what is required to 
produce high quality characters that go above the 
run of the mill and how to integrate more fine art 
with digital art. 



Roundtable 3324/4320/5318 

ART TOOL SHOWDOWN! 

TERRI HANN0N 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Harbor B/C, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency E, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency D, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:00 
2:00-3:00 
2:00-3:00 



Artists! Come defend your favorite paint tools, or 
learn about the benefits and disadvantages of 
leading tools. Discussions center around 
Photoshop, Painter, PaintShop Pro, Photopaint 8, 
and Picture Publisher. Feel free to bring up others 
we should all know. What are the best aspects and 
what's unique? What would you like to see in the 
future? What's your opinion? Show off your special 



Roundtable 3122/4520/5221 

ART TOOLS: RT3D MODELING 
DISCUSSION 

LISA WASHBURN 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 10:00-11:00 

Harbor B/C, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 5:00-6:00 

Regency E, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 11:30-12:30 

Regency E, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 

Softimage, Alias, Max, MultiGen, Lightwave, 
Nichimen, we all know the competitors' names, but 
most game artists master only one. Is your's better 
for building characters? Which is best for animat- 
ing? Does one have great vertex editing, another 
fabulous mapping tools? Is one friendly for real- 
time lighting tricks, the others not so nice? Come 
defend your favorite modeling software and find 
out what others can do. Bring your tool's special 
strengths and worst weaknesses, and see if anoth- 
er contender can beat it. Venders welcome to 
answer questions, but no sales pitches please. 

Intended for experienced RT3D artists. 



Lecture 

ARTISTS AND GAME DESIGN 
DOCUMENTS: FROM 
INTERPRETATION TO 
IMPLEMENTATION 

JOSHUA GORDON 



5302 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



2:00-3:1 



When you create artwork directed by a designer or 
design document, do you really know what the 
designer intended and why? How much creative 
freedom do you have? This class discusses all 
aspects of the artist/designer interaction including 
interpretation and implementation of the game 
design by artists as well as improving communica- 
tion between artists and designers during produc- 
tion. This discussion ranges from blue sky creative 
meetings to initial game design script, reference 
material to conceptual drawings, initial production 
to final game tuning. Artists are invited to bring 
drawing materials and participate in a sketch and 
review exercise. 



Lecture 4120 

BUILDING TIGHT REAL-TIME 
MODELS 

OCEAN QUIGLEY 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

101 A, Convention Center 



10:00-11:00 



Real-time 3D is a distinct skill separate from more 
traditional 3D modeling. There are a number of 
techniques real-time artists use to build extremely 
efficient models. This session covers these tech- 
niques in step-by-step detail with the creation of 
an organic real-time model. These techniques are 
the bedrock of polygonal modeling and gives the 
artist the means to plan and create arbitrary 3D 
models. 

This is an intermediate level session aimed at artists 
who are familiar with 3D but not necessarily with 
real-time techniques. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

CGDC CLASSES 



Roundtable 3318/4414/5415 

CONTRACT ARTIST VS. IN-HOUSE 
ARTIST 

DALE H0MBURG & JIMMIE H0MBURG 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 

Pacific, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Pacific, Hyatt 



2:00-3:00 



3:30-4:30 



3:30-4:30 



This roundtable is an opportunity for artists to dis- 
cuss the advantages and disadvantages of working 
as an in-house or contract artist. We compare 
effective methods of communication between 
artists and programmers. The pleasures and pitfalls 
of working contract and in-house and how to suc- 
cessfully deal with working with a committee. 
Testimonials from artists from all sorts of compa- 
nies as well as artists that work independently is 
encouraged. Come share your experiences and 
learn how your fellow artists have solved problems 



F 



m m 

OMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 





you might have in common. This roundtable is 
designed for artists by artists. The art of program- 
ming artwork into a game is not discussed. 



Lecture 4418 

DIRECTING AN ART DEPARTMENT 

GLENSCHOFIELD 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 

102 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



This session covers all aspects of managing and 
maintaining an art department. The session 
dpsrrihps thp ronrriinatinn nf art asseK anH man- 




recruit the right artist for the your project and how 
best to utilize their talents within your existing 
team. 

Intended for aspiring art directors, senior artists, 
artists, producers, assistant producers. 



CURRENT AND 
FUTURE INFO ON 

THE WEB @ 
WWW.CGDC.COM 



Roundtable 3428/4220/5420 

GAME ART STYLES: THE 
DISCUSSION 

LYNELL JINKS 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Harbor B/C, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency F, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Regency F, Hyatt 



3:30-4:30 



11:30-12:30 



3:30-4:30 



^68 



This roundtable focuses on the varied artistic styles 
in computer games today. We'll also talk about the 
overall importance of art in games. Are current 3D 
games focused too much on art rather than game- 
play or just the opposite? Are visually amazing 
games like Riven and Myst more compelling than 
highly interactive games with weaker graphics, like 
Tomb Raider? Come with opinions on games like 
Mario World, Crash Bandicoot Resident Evil, FFVII, 



Odd World: Abe's Oddysee, Myst & Riven, Quake I 
& II, Jedi Knight, Shadows of the Empire, Golden 
Eye, Tomb Raider I & II, and other major hits. 



Seminar 3224 

HOW TO BREAK IN AS AN ARTIST 

CARRIE GALBRAITH 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
102 A, Convention Center 



11:30-12:30 



Learn how to get the job in game development 
you've always dreamed of. This session teaches you 
where to start the job search, what jobs to target, 
what to show potential employers, and what is 
expected once you start. Practical issues range 
from how to present your resume, cover letter and 
portfolio to how to catch an art director's eye. 



Sponsored 3151/3351/4151/4351 
by Softimage 

KILLER GAMES WITH 
S0FTIMAGE|3D 

SOFTIMAGE 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 10:00-12:00 

Room 203 A, Convention Center 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 2:00-4:00 

Room 203 A, Convention Center 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 10:00-12:00 

Room 203 A, Convention Center 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 2:00-4:00 

Room 203 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 

See how SOFTIMAGE|3D is used for creating indus- 
try-leading games, including advanced technigues 
in modeling, texturing, animation, and platform 
export. This session presents an overview of the 
new SOFTIMAGE|GDK, a high-level API used for 
import-export tool creation, as well a high-level 
customer presentation from Tantrum Entertainment 
on their use of SOFTIMAGE|3D for creation of their 
latest game. 



Roundtable 3120/4118/5218 

THE MARRIAGE OF ART AND 
CODE 

TALIN 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Pacific, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency E, Hyatt 



10:00-11:00 



10:00-11:00 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 
Regency D, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



Computer games are an intricately tangled web of 
both technical and artistic effort, a collision of 
diverse skill sets. But how does the synthesis of 
these diverse disciplines work? In this roundtable, 
we'll tackle the problem several ways: On the tech- 
nical side, we consider how algorithms can create 
"beautiful" game experiences, how the laws of 
thematic composition and drama can be "encod- 
ed" into a software routine. From the artistic point 
of view, we'll talk about "engineering" a piece of 
art, building re-usable art components, creating 
"logical" art with "parameterizable" features. 
Practitioners of other creative disciplines, such as 
music, design, and writing, can also participate as 
we explore potential meldings of "left brain" and 
"right brain" inventiveness. 



Lecture 4202 

PICTURE IMPERFECT: COMMON 
3D RENDERING FLAWS 

BRAD CAIN 



THURSDAY, MAY 7 
104 A, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



As 3D technology advances rapidly on the PC plat- 
form, many users are finding that the current solu- 
tions are not perfect. Image guality and perfor- 
mance often do not meet the users' expectations, 
and developers are forced to work around the 
imperfections of numerous platforms. This session 
looks at some common problems in 3D rendering, 
with the focus on image quality problems, their 
causes, and possible solutions. Problems are pre- 
sented through a combination of simple 3D tests 
and real applications. Flaws are inspected at the 
pixel level to understand what's really going on. 



Seminar 3103 

PLANNING AND DIRECTING 
MOTION CAPTURE FOR GAMES 

MELIANTHE KINES 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency A, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



Plan your motion capture shoot intelligently, and 
you have a fun and effective way to bring life to 
your game's characters. Start production unpre- 
pared, and you're probably in for a frustrating 
nightmare of wasted time, money and energy. How 
you direct your motion capture talent is equally 
critical; will your game's character be represented 





by the fluid moves of an energetic, talented per- 
former, or the stiff lumberings of a sullen, exhaust- 
ed sleepwalker? (And your game wasn't supposed 
to have zombies in it.) This seminar addresses the 
numerous challenges posed by a motion capture 
shoot. How to: turn an animation list into an orga- 
nized motion capture shot list; find talent to play 
those wacky game characters you've invented; get 
a great performance out of that uncooperative 
celebrity (who really hates the skintight black suit); 
and capture your animator's dream move, within 
the studio's capture space and the program's 
frame count. Sample shot lists, schedules and flow- 
charts are created, and mo-cap performance in 
past games reviewed. 

Intended for directors, producers, animators, or pro- 
grammers involved in planning and directing 
motion capture production for game content. 



Roundtable 3218/4514/5515 

PROGRAMMERS VS ARTISTS 

CHRIS FREGIEN & LANE ROATHE 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 11:30-12:30 

Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 5:00-6:00 

Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 5:00-6:00 

Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 

BEGINNER 

Programmers and artists don't communicate 
enough and that this hurts the projects they work 
on. Use this forum to assist people in fixing the 
problems. Come join the discussion and find out 
what you can do to improve your project. 
This RT is intended for artists who work with pro- 
grammers and programmers who work with artists. 

Intended for attendees who work with either pro- 
grammers or artists (or, in the case of managers, 
both). 



Lecture 5202 

REAL-TIME 3D ART IDEAS FROM 
ONLINE APPLICATIONS 

STASIA MCGEHEE 



FRIDAY, MAY 8 

101 B, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



11:30-12:30 



Come find inspiration in different approaches to 
RT3D artwork, and review artwork of the burgeon- 
ing web-based low-poly 3D applications. This ses- 
sion explores the works of various artists who have 
made the strict requirements of low bandwidth 
Internet applications to work in their favor, produc- 
ing works of great beauty and depth. Various 



methods for evoking ambiance and creating mood 
through the use of color, form, composition, light- 
ing, cinematography, proportion and gesture is 
explored. 

Intended for anyone and everyone interested in the 
inter-disciplinary task of real-time development. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FDR 

UPDATED INFU UN 

C6DC CLASSES 



Roundtable 3118/4116/5115 

SPECIAL FX FOR REAL-TIME 3D 
GAMES 

GREG HAMMOND 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
Regency F, Hyatt 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 
Regency C, Hyatt 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 

Beacon Rotunda, Hyatt 

INTERMEDIATE 



10:00-11:00 



10:00-11:00 



10:00-11:00 



The proliferation of 3D accelerated gaming hard- 
ware has enabled artists to produce stunning visual 
effects for real-time 3D games like never before. As 
the hardware continues to improve, what kinds of 
effects can we expect to create? This roundtable 
discussion focuses on the production of cutting 
edge special effects, including (but not limited to) 
pyrotechnics, lighting effects, texture animation, 
particle systems, and algorithmically generated 
effects. This roundtable explores techniques and 
tricks to use with paint programs, Photoshop-com- 
patible filters, and 3D animation software. 

Intended for artists working on special effects for 
real-time 3D games. 

Prerequisites: Experience with high-end paint soft- 
ware, Photoshop-compatible filters, and a rudimen- 
tary understanding of 3D animation software. 



Lecture 3402 

3D CHARACTER MODELING FOR 
ANIMATION 

STEFAN HENRY-BISKUP 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 
104 C, Convention Center 

INTERMEDIATE 



3:30-4:30 



3D character animation is one of the fastest grow- 
ing areas of computer game development. But 
before you can begin to bring a character to life 
you must have a solid model to animate. 
Aesthetically, a good model must accurately cap- 
ture the personality and form of the original 
design. Technically, it must be properly built to 
allow the freedom of movement that animation 
requires. Just what goes into the creation of a suc- 
cessful model is what this session addresses. 
Spline-based modeling techniques for both high 
and low-poly models are demonstrated and dis- 
cussed. This session also explores the use of char- 
acter sheets and strong anatomical reference to 
reach our aesthetic goals. Careful attention to 
anatomical structure is focused on to meet techni- 
cal requirements. Accurate placement of bones and 
the structure of surfaces over the joints is 
addressed. 

Intended for anyone looking for tips and techniques 
on creating 3D character models for high or low-poly 
applications that will be succesful in animation. 

Prerequisites: A good understading of a spline 
based modeling package and a and a hierarchical 
bone deformation animation system benefits the 
audience. 



Lecture 5206 

YOU WANT WHAT? SCALEABLE 
CHARACTER APPROACHES FOR 
3D REAL-TIME 

PAUL LEWIS 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 11:30-12:30 

Regency A, Hyatt 

ADVANCED 

This session describes a simple procedural 
approach to developing 3D characters with accu- 
rate physical features, including muscles, for vary- 
ing levels of detail and changing skeletal dimen- 
sions, while maintaining geometry and texture 
control. 



f 



OMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 





SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES 




JAMES ACKLEY 

James Ackley has worked as a sound engineer in the 
recording industry as well as the interactive enter- 
tainment world for five years. His game credits 
include Blood, Riot: Mobile Armor, Captain Claw, 
Shivers, Power Chess, among other popular titles. 
Prior to entering the interactive entertainment indus- 
try, he owned and operated a recording studio in 
Seattle, Washington. 

MEHMET ADALIER 

Mehmet Adalier is a SW applications engineering 
manager with Intel. His work currently involves 3D 
programming and optimization for Intel platforms 
including Pentium II and AGP. He also works with 
ISVs in architecturing high-end game titles. 

ERNEST ADAMS 

Ernest Adams has been a professional game devel- 
oper for eight years. He has a bachelor's degree in 
philosophy, a 14-mile commute, and no car radio to 
occupy his mind. His rather eclectic and occasionally 
pornographic lectures are the result of this conflu- 
ence of circumstances. 

PETER AKEMANN 

Peter Akemann is currently the project leader of Die 
By The Sword his past work include: Walls of Rome, 
Magic Candle II and The Keys to Maramon. 

JESSE ALLREAD 

Jesse Allread has created successful business struc- 
tures for both U.S. and international companies. With 
an eye towards strong foundations, he introduces 
infrastructure, locates and secures capital, deter- 
mines marketing and sales strategies, directs product 
fulfillment, distribution and retail sales, and aligns 
strategic partners for multimedia, interactive and 
Internet commerce businesses. 

HAMILTON ALTSTATT 

Hamilton Altstatt has been doing music and sound 
design for multimedia titles since the days when 
286's were the hot platform, an Adlib card was 
about the only alternative to PC speaker, and CD- 
ROM's were the wave of the future. A GIT graduate 
and closet headbanger, some of his credits include 
Casper, Harvester, Descent, Spielberg's Director's 
Chair, Spiderman, Dinosaur Adventure and 101 
Dalmations. Formerly the audio manager for 
Knowledge Adventure, he currently oversees audio 
production at Disney Interactive, and still owns a 
Roland MT-32. 

CHARLES AUSTIN 

Charles Austin is president of Los Angeles-based 
Austin Digital Media Consulting, which expands 
market share for its Internet and new media client 
companies by developing strategic alliances that cre- 



ate market awareness, creating sponsorships and 
driving e-commerce traffic to their sites. He also rep- 
resents out-of-area companies in Hollywood and the 
Los Angeles market. 

PETER RAKER 

Pete Baker is a technical marketing engineer and 
lead processor evangelist for Intel's developer rela- 
tions group. 

MARK BALDWIN 

Mark Baldwin is a long time computer game design- 
er specializing in strategy and wargames. His first 
published computer game was Starbase 13 in 1982, 
and through the years has published numerous pop- 
ular games including Empire, Star Fleet I, Star Fleet 
II, D.R.A.G.O.N. FORCE, Star Legions, The Perfect 
General, Empire Deluxe and Empire II, The Art of War. 
From the period 1990-1995 Mark was president of 
White Wolf Productions. He is currently providing 
consulting services on computer games and publish- 
ing for both commercial companies and the United 
States Air Force. 

HAIMBARAD 

Haim Barad is a staff engineer and techical leader of 
the 3D team in Intel's microprocessor products lab in 
Haifa, Israel. 

JEFFREY BARISH 

Dr. Jeffrey Barish is founder and president of 
EuPhonics, a software development firm specializing 
in digital audio and digital music synthesis software 
for the multimedia industry. Prior to establishing 
EuPhonics, Jeffrey was founder and vice president of 
engineering of Sonic Solutions, where he developed 
a computer system for eliminating noise from music 
recordings. He also worked at Lucasfilm/The Droid 
Works, where he was hardware manager of the 
team developing SoundDroid, a programmable sys- 
tem for processing digital audio. 

JONATHAN BARON 

Prior to his work in the gaming industry, Jonathan 
Baron worked as an aide to Congressmen Barney 
Frank and Bill Richardson. After his political career 
he brought his skills in social engineeing and manip- 
ulation to the gaming community as a designer and 
producer on such works as Air Warrior for Windows, 
Air Warrior II, and Air Warrior 3D. He is the chairman 
of the editorial committee at Kesmai Studios. 

ROB BATES 

Bob Bates began his writing career at Infocom in 
1986. Since then he has written, co-designed, pro- 
duced, or otherwise hindered the development of 
more than 20 adventure games that have won over 
30 industry awards. Since 1989 he has been presi- 
dent of Legend Entertainment, which astounds both 
him and the people who work there. 



GRAEME BAYLESS 

Graeme Bayless entered the computer gaming field 
in 1987, working with Strategic Simulations on such 
products as Panzer Strike and Battles of Napoleon. 
Over the years, he's been a producer, a director, a 
designer, and a QA manager for a range of compa- 
nies on a range of products. His most recent game 
was MissionForce: CyberStorm, and he's currently 
working to complete the sequel. 

DANIEL BEAUDRY 

Daniel Beaudry is a software design engineer for the 
games group at Softimage. He is involved in the 
development of DirectX converters, polygonal mesh 
data structure as well as the GDK product. He has a 
masters degree in Al (conceptual graphs) and multi- 
media. He also has a dark beard, a rather high- 
pitched voice (non-screechy), and an adorable son 
that he usually calls Thomas (as does everybody 
else). He also uses mon gentil lapin from time to 
time, not because he actually is a rabbit but cuz he's 
really sweet and soft and all. 

DAVID REYER 

David K. Beyer is the vice president of the technolo- 
gy group for Frank Crystal & Company of California, 
Inc. He is recognized as one of the most knowledge- 
able insurance brokers specializing in technology 
insurance. 

BILL BLACK 

Bill Black is a sound effects designer, music compos- 
er and dialog coordinator working from his 
Hollywood based studio. He has been involved in 
over 30 US and foreign computer games and arcade 
rides including the new Warren Miller Ski Ride at 
Ceaser's Palace. His company, Big Fat Kitty 
Productions has provided sound effects, recording, 
casting and directing actors, writing, editing, pro- 
cessing and mixing sound for many video game 
titles. 

J0NDL0SS0M 

You wouldn't think studying Hinduism and 
Buddhism in college would prepare Jon Blossom for 
a programming job in the computer game industry, 
but it was enough to land him a position developing 
multimedia and game technology at Microsoft. After 
authoring a book on real-time 3D graphics, helping 
to create Maxis' SimPark ecology game for kids, and 
co-founding definition six incorporated, Jon joined 
Lucas Learning. There, he is lead programmer on a 
team creating an educational title using LucasArts' 
Jedi Knight engine. 

KIMBERLEEBOGEN 

As managing director of Bogen Associates 
International, Kimberlee Bogen provides legal and 
business-development counseling, advice, and ser- 
vices to interactive media firms and individuals (yes, 






ti 



she's a lawyer), in addition to providing marketplace 
and competitive analyses. BAI has developed the 
"business in a box" start-up service for companies 
and individuals just beginning to be organized as a 
low-cost method of accessing needed legal and 
business services at an affordable price. 

LOURDES BOURAS 

Lourdes Bouras has worked in the multimedia 
industry for over ten years. She worked for 
Anderson Consulting designing multimedia solu- 
tions in the area of Network for Apple and Novel. 
Later at Jostens Learning she led the design and 
production of award winning products. Currently 
she is a director of interactive product development 
at The Lightspan Partnership, Inc. where she has 
managed the release of over 20 titles. 

WADE BRAINERD 

Wade Brainerd is a lead programmer at JVC Digital 
Arts Studio, Inc., located in Torrance, CA. He has 
spent the last two years working on their major title 
for 1998, during which he has performed substantial 
amounts of research in the field of high resolution, 
true color graphics programming. 

ELIZABETH BRASWELL 

Elizabeth Braswell is the executive producer of all of 
Star Trek titles at Simon and Schuster Interactive. She 
has been in the industry for five years. 

REILLY BRENNAN 

Reilly Brennan is the managing editor of GameWEEK 
magazine, a trade publication for professionals with- 
in the interactive entertainment industry, including 
buyers, distributors, managers, sales people, and the 
development community. 

KORY BRICKER 

Kory Bricker has over five years of multimedia devel- 
opment using a variety of langues including: Delphi, 
Visual Basic, Director, Toolbook, and Authorware. 
Kory used these tools to create a variety of titles in 
many areas including: educational titles, multimedia 
sales presentations, kiosks, bussiness applications, 
and multimedia rich Internet sites. His role in these 
projects have been that of a senior level programmer 
or sole programmer. 

CHARLIE BROWN 

Charlie Brown is working on a next generation game 
engine at Ritual Entertainment named UberEngine. 
Charlie attended the University of Florida and is a 
former employee of 3Dfx Interactive. 

GARY BRUBAKER 

Gary Brubaker is a lead designer and programmer 
for an space borne telescope launched by the 
Japanese Space Agency. At LucasArts for six years, 
he has been lead programmer on The Dig and 
Shadows of the Empire for Windows 95. He has 
also contributed code to Rebel Assault, Dark 
Forces, Monkey Island 3 and number of internal 
tools. 



DANI BUNTEN BERRY 

Dani Bunten Berry has designed and directed devel- 
opment of 1 2 original computer games for major 
publishers. Among them were ten multiplayer games 
and three online games including Modem Wars and 
the first four-player network game by a major pub- 
lisher, Global Conguest. Her best known titles are: 
Command HQ, Seven Cities of Gold, and M.U.L.E. 
Her first Internet-only game (WarSport) is currently 
in testing. She is currently a design consultant. 

BRAD CAIN 

Brad spent almost nine years building expensive and 
complex workstation 3D graphics subsystems at 
Hewlett Packard before escaping to the PC industry 
in 1993. He has designed and built both microcode 
and host-based 3D library code on Unix systems, and 
has also worked on a setup chip and built numerous 
development tools. The last few year, Brad has been 
working on PC display drivers and related graphics 
technology. 

GJONCAMAJ 

Gjon Camaj is a co-founder of Image Space 
Incorporated. Gjon specializes in the creation of visu- 
al databases and the design and development of 
entertainment software. His experience includes the 
design and development of real-time embedded 
software, Instructor/Operator stations for aircraft 
simulators, and visual databases for driving simula- 
tors. Virgin Interactive is publishing Image Space's 
current title, Profession SportsCar racing. 
Jim Charne 

Prior to his appointment as president and execu- 
tive director of the Academy of Inteactive Arts and 
Sciences, Jim Charne maintatined an interactive 
entertainment and music industry law practice in 
Santa Monica, California. 

HAMILTON CHU 

Hamilton Chu rose from the depths of the guality 
assurance department of MicroProse Software, even- 
tually becoming a designer. He was then in design 
and production atTecMagik before moving onto Red 
Storm Entertainment where was producer and lead 
designer. Hamilton now works for Bungie Software 

DOUG CHURCH 

Doug Church was the project leader: Ultima 
Underworld I and II, System Shock, SwatTeam: Flight 
Unlimited. Doug has been in the industry since May 
1990. This is his eighth CGDC. 

GILBERT COLGATE 

Colgate Gilbert has been the lead engineer on a host 
of titles, from the Apple II to the Pentium, from the 
Lynx to the Playstation. His credits include: Pacman 
Ghost Zone, Kids On Site, Supreme Warrior, Mutant 
League Football, Xenophobe, Balance Of Power. 

JEANNE COLLINS 

As the former test manager at GTE Interactive, 
Jeanne Collins has extensive knowledge in setting 
up and running in-house testing departments. 



GREG CORSON 

Greg Corson has been involved in games since the 
early '80s doing some of the first multiplayer graph- 
ics games for the GEnie system. He joined Virtual 
World Entertainment in 1991 and was key in devel- 
oping their multiplayer location based entertainment 
games BattleTech and Red Planet. Greg was heavily 
involved in rendering and creating visual effects and 
is now working for NEC/PowerVR in a developer 
support role. 

SPENCER CRITCHLEY 

Spencer Critchley is the director of audio production 
at Silicon Gaming in Palo Alto, California. Silicon 
Gaming, created by the founders of Crystal 
Dynamics, 3DO, Atari and Amiga, was established to 
bring Hollywood production values and Silicon Valley 
technology to the casino slot machine, a medium 
previously stuck in the 70's. Prior to joining Silicon 
Gaming in 1 996, Spencer was in charge of audio 
production for an interactive TV system developed by 
Silicon Graphics, AT&T and Time Warner. 

PHILIP CROSS 

Philip Cross is co-chairman of Coopers & Lybrand's 
media and entertainment group and is responsible 
for coordinating C&L's full range of services to com- 
panies in film, television, music, broadcasting, pub- 
lishing, multimedia and advertising sectors. 

ALLEN CUNNINGHAM 

Allen Cunningham is president of Boxer Jam 
Productions, an online entertainment developer 
based in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

DONDAGLOW 

Don Daglow is president of Stormfront Studios, 
developers of major titles including John Madden 
Football, Andretti Racing, Star Trek: Deep Space 
Nine, the Tony La Russa Baseball series and discov- 
ery Channel's Byzantine: the Betrayal. Don has led 
design teams since 1981, as director of game design 
for Mattel's Intellivision, as a producer at EA, and as 
the head of Broderbund's entertainment and educa- 
tion division before founding Stormfront in 1988. 

JAMES DANIEL 

James Daniel has been gaming since his brother got 
AH's Gettysburg for Christmas in 1964. He's been 
computer gaming since Pong. He has designed both 
miniature and computer games over the last 1 5 
years, including two Napoleonic rules sets and two 
Windows based computer games: The Great War 
which can be found on ZDnet and Skulls, Bones, and 
Bucaneers an online multiplayer game soon to be 
published. 

RUSTY DAWE 

Rusty Dawe has been active in the computer graph- 
ics and computer gaming fields for more than 20 
years. As director of applications development for 
WorldPlay Entertainment, Rusty Dawe serves as 
Chief Architect for the Cyberpark project, a 3D 
walk-around environment housing games and enter- 
tainment content available on America Online's 



COMPUTER CAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




Game Channel. Previous to WorldPlay, Dawe worked 
at Atari Games where he designed, programmed 
and/or produced several titles including Cloak & 
Dagger, Paperboy, and I Robot. He has been active in 
the online arena designing and implementing 
games, environments and communities of interest 
since 1988. 

MARK DAY 

Mark Day received his broadcasting degree from San 
Francisco State University and after spending 10 
years in the "biz" as an editor and producer decided 
to combine his computer gaming hobby with his pro- 
fessional liner experience into a new career at 
Electronic Arts. The results were products such as 
Jordan In Flight, US Navy Fighters, Shockwave, Wing 
Commander III and IV and more recently Wing 
Commander Prophecy and Wing Commander 4DVD. 
Born of two worlds yet belonging entirely to neither, 
Mark spends much of his personal and professional 
time striving to create the killer app that will forever 
bridge the gap between FMV and traditional interac- 
tive products. 

CHARLES DEVRIES 

Charles de Vries is an award-winning director from 
Europe who speaks five languages. He studied 
design at Art Center College, acting at ANTA 
(American National Theater Academy), and special- 
ized in voice over since 1 985. He produced and 
directed French and German versions of over 30 
Hollywood movies and over 20 computer games. 
Through his company Charles de Vries Multimedia, 
Inc. he provides adaptations, casting, directing, 
recording, etc. Recent projects include U.S. versions 
of Panzer General, Battlezone, Fighter Squadron, 
Quest for Glory 5, Lighthouse and foreign versions of 
Riven, Dark Reign, Koala, Last Express, lnterstate'76 
and Mechwarrior II. 

RUSELDEMARIA 

Rusel DeMaria has spent the past 1 8 years as a jour- 
nalist in the computer and computer game fields, 
serving as a senior editor and columnist with several 
gaming magazines, launching Prima Publishing's 
successful Secrets of the Games series, and writing 
more than 50 game strategy books. He now spends 
most of his time thinking about what's next for com- 
puter gaming, designing original games, and game 
doctoring-consulting with other companies to make 
their games more fun. 

RICK DENNY 

Rick Denny is chief entertainment officer of iPlay, a 
multiplayer Internet games company that develops 
social entertainment for both core and casual 
gamers. Over the seven years prior to founding iPlay, 
Denny made product marketing, business develop- 
ment and international management contributions 
to four successful PC software start-ups: OZ 
Interactive, America Online (Johnson-Grace), Caligari 
and Micrografx (Roykore). Prior to his high-tech 
career, Denny was a management consultant with 
Deloitte and Touche, as well as an airborne-qualified 
infantry platoon leader with the Army Reserve. 



DRAD DERRICK 

Brad Derrick has worked for Kesmai Corporation for 
two years, creating sound effects, writing music, and 
designing the audio for some of Kesmai's biggest 
games. 

ELAINE DITTON 

Elaine Ditton started in the video game business in 
1981 programming coin-operated video games such 
as Domino Man, Wacko, Journey, and Tapper for 
Bally/Midway. Over the last 12 years she has worked 
with many talented people who have produced 
many coin-op and consumer games including 
Capcom Bowling, Time Killers and Golden Tee 3D 
Golf. Incredible Technologies currently has 50 
employees and 25 million dollar annual sales. She 
has seen bad times and good times and have many 
stories to tell. 

CHRIS DONAHUE 

Chris Donahue has been involved in building online 
communities and the online gaming world for over 
10 years. Currently, Chris is manager of ISV relations 
and content development at nVidia Corporation. 
Prior to that, he served as the producer of core ser- 
vice and technologies for the ImagiNation Network 
(now WorldPlay), and oversaw the production of 
their 3D entertainment environment, CyberPark. Also 
at Worldplay, he has acted as quality assurance man- 
ager and LAN manager. Prior to the ImagiNation 
Network, he was with Sierra Online technical sup- 
port managing support of the Sierra Network and 
other games. 

SHANNON DONNELLY 

Shannon Donnelly is a founder of Brother Wolf an 
interactive design company whose clients include 
Universal, Intermetrics, Fox, Film Roman and others. 
Shannon has designed Pony Express, Girl's Club, 
Nomad, SEGA PICO titles, and others. 

MICHAEL D0RNDR00K 

Mike Dornbrook founded the Zork Users Group 
while away at business school and invented 
InvisiClues. Upon graduation, Infocom brought him 
back to create a marketing department, where he 
launched 45 titles. He was president of Boffo Games, 
which he cofounded in 1994. Recently, he headed 
up marketing at Looking Glass on a consulting basis, 
helping to launch Flight Unlimited II. Mike is nowVP 
of sales and marketing at Harmonix Music Systems, 
launching a new category of entertainment software. 

CLAY DRESLOUGH 

Clay Dreslough has been writing sports simulations 
and strategy games since he was seven years old 
and started programming computer games at the 
age of 10. He has been programming professionally 
for eight years. In 1995, Clay left a medium-sized 
game developer and founded Infinite Monkey 
Systems Inc. in order to bring addictive sports fran- 
chise simulation games to the computer game mar- 
ketplace. The company's first product, Baseball 
Mogul, received the best rating among 1997 base- 
ball products in all six magazines that reviewed it. 



Infinite Monkey Systems Inc. turned a profit in its 
third year, and is continuing to grow. 

DIANNEDROSNES 

Dianne Drosnes founded DiaNova International in 
May 1996. The company provides consulting and 
representation for software publishers providing 
assistance in the area of international software 
licensing and strategic alliances. Its clients have 
included Mattel Media, MicroProse and Acclaim as 
well as companies headquartered in Brazil, France 
and Chile. 

JEFF DWIGHT 

Jeff Dwight has over 10 years sales and marketing 
experience. He has been involved with the Internet 
and the interactive entertainment industry for the 
past 3 years and currently serves as the director of 
interactive sales and marketing for Cyberactive 
Publishing , publisher of GameWEEK magazine and I 
producer of the Cyberactive Network. 

ERICDYDSAND 

Eric Dybsand is currently developing leading edge Al 
programming for a 3D action-shooter developed by 
Fenris Wolf. He also did the Al programming for the 
Windward Studios real-time strategy game Enemy 
Nations. Eric has been involved with computer 
games since 1987, designing, programming, and 
testing. 

ELIERHMAN 

Eli Ehrman, the founder of 2AM, has been program- 
ming various ambitious software systems for more 
than 12 years. From 1991 through 1993, Eli devel- 
oped a Windows programming tool called Trackdeck 
for which he was awarded the 1993 StarTech Award, ' 
the Windows development industry's highest honor, 
for innovation and excellence. 

FRANK EVERS 

Frank Evers is responsible for running 60-man 
Action/Sim Studio, within Activision's LA Studios. 
Frank also runs the company's most successful OEM 
division which works closely with all of the leading 
game technology companies. 

NOAHFALSTEIN 

Noah Falstein created his first computer game in 
1976. He has been employed in this industry since 
1980, at companies such as Williams Electronics, 
LucasArts Entertainment, and Dreamworks 
Interactive. Currently he runs The Inspiracy, providing 
interactive design services, creating original designs 
and helping companies polish and present their own 
ideas. Recent clients include Dreamworks Interactive 
(The Lost World: Chaos Island), and Disney 
Interactive. Noah was also the first elected chairman 
of the Computer Game Developers Association. 

ANTHONY FARMER 

Anthony Farmer has been developing games for 
almost 15 years. He started writing games for the 
Atari 800 computer for fun, then went on to write 
commercial software for the Atari ST. After that, he 






went on to DOS for a few years, and has spent the 
last 5 years or so writing for Windows. On the games 
he's worked on, he has usually been the lead pro- 
grammer, and often has been the designer and pro- 
ject manager. He is currently a lead programmer with 
Psygnosis and a featured contributor to a prominent 
game developer magazine. 

MELISSA FARMER 

Melissa Farmer has been in the computer and video 
game industry for about five years as a producer, 
writer, designer, and marketing manager. She has 
worked for companies such as Stormfront Studios, 
Titus Software, and is the former executive director 
of the Computer Game Developers Association, and 
coordinator of BACED North (Bay Area Computer 
Entertainment Developers) networking group, and is 
a contributing author to Cursor Magazine. 

ANDY FISCHER 

Andy Fischer is the managing editor of The Peddie 
Report, a weekly newsletter which follows the digital 
media industry from a hardware developer's perspec- 
tive. Prior to joining Jon Peddie Associates in 1 994, 
Andy was with Hercules Computer Technology where 
he held product management and marketing posi- 
tions, and from which tenure he bears the scars of 
more than a few benchmark battles. 

KELLY FLOCK 

Kelly Flock currently manages all PSX, PC and online 
product development for Sony in North America, 
including major studios in San Diego and Foster City. 
In addition, Kelly is vice president, product licensing 
for Sony Computer Entertainment of America (SCEA) 
and manages the licensing of externally developed 
titles such as Crash Bandicoot l/ll, and Final Fantasy 
VII, for SCEA distribution. He's waiting for Don 
Mattrick to cough up the $ 1 00 bet they made at E3 
that Gameday would outsell Madden. (Hey Don' I 
won! Want to go for double or nothing?) 

RONFOSNER 

Ron Fosner is a long-time graphics programmer. He 
taught an introductory course on OpenGL program- 
ming at the 1997 CGDC, and he's the author of 
OpenGL Programming for Windows 95 and Windows 
NT from Addison-Wesley. From the uncomfortable 
position balancing on the leading edge, he's been a 
long proponent of accelerated 3D PC graphics. He's 
the founder of Data Visualization, a consulting com- 
pany specializing in fast OpenGL and Direct3D soft- 
ware for the Windows platform. He's authored 
graphics articles in Microsoft Systems Journal, Dr. 
Dobbs, and Game Developer magazines. 

JOHN FOWLER 

John Fowler, is president of Location Based 
Entertainment Systems, L.L.C. He is a fourteen year 
veteran of the entertainment software industry. John 
has held positions in sales and marketing for the 
consumer division of several leading arcade compa- 
nies such as Atari Games and Midway. 



ADAM FRANK 

Adam Frank has been designing and implementing 
Virtual Computer Petz since 1995. Adam is lead 
designer and animator, trained at RISD. He has spo- 
ken at the 1996 Lifelike Computer Characters 
Conference, the 1997 CGDC, and the 1997 AAAI 
Socially Intelligent Agents symposium at MIT. 

CHRIS FREGIEN 

Chris Fregien is a self taught artist, at least for the 
most part. He's worked in computer and video 
games for nearly five years and he doesn't intend to 
quit now. His background before games is mostly in 
illustration and animation. Throw in a little sculpture, 
mix in a little insanity, a lot of imagination, and 
admittedly a tiny bit of stubborness and you have 
Chris. 

JOHNFDNGE 

During John Funge's stay at Oxford University he 
became interested in computer graphics. He was 
commissioned by a television channel to do a study 
on a computer game show. This made him realize 
the difficulties associated with developing intelligent 
characters. Therefore, for his PhD at the University of 
Toronto he developed a new approach to high-level 
control of characters in games and animation. He 
continues this work at Intel's advanced graphics 
research group. 

JONATHAN FONK 

Jonathan E. Funk is general partner of Media 
Technology Ventures, a $70 million venture capital 
fund organized in 1996 and focusing on start-up 
investments in information, communications and 
multimedia technology. 

JOSH GABRIEL 

Josh Gabriel is vice president and founder of Mixman 
Technologies Inc, a San Francisco-based developer of 
software that enables consumers to create, perform 
and record their own music. Josh started experi- 
menting with interactive music in 1986 and those 
experiments have taken him around the world. After 
earning a degree in music composition from the 
California institute of the Arts, Josh has been 
involved in many facets of music production. From 
traditional recording and mastering, to music and 
sound design for video games. Most recently, he pro- 
duced the music an sound design for Oddworld: 
Abe's Oddessy. 

CARRIE GALRRAITH 

Carrie Galbraith is the director of art at Psygnosis in 
San Francisco. 

PATGARVEY 

Pat Garvey is a freelance game industry consultant 
whose most recent industry position was vice presi- 
dent of marketing at Novalogic. 

SCOn MARTIN GERSHIN 

Scott Martin Gershin's current film projects include 
Flubber and Mouse Hunt. Other recent work in film 
includes Hunchback of Notre Dame, Courage Under 



Fire, Braveheart, Pocahontas, True Lies, and Heat. 
Recent interactive projects include Trespasser, Dark 
Reign, Apocalypse, Mech Warrior 2, Descent, 
Spycraft, and Zork Nemesis. Continuing his interest 
in education, Scott periodically lectures as a guest 
artist at Berklee College of Music about creating 
sound effects for film and the multimedia industry. 
He has also taught several semesters of classes at 
UCLA Extension about digital audio workstations 
and is a consultant for many leading audio equip- 
ment manufacturers. 

DODGGLEN 

Doug Glen is senior vice president, chief strategy 
officer of Mattel, Inc. His responsibilities include 
managing the company's strategic planning process, 
identifying new business opportunities, and develop- 
ing strategic alliances. 

DEANGLOSTER 

Dean Gloster is a partner and co-chair of the 
Internet and multimedia practice group at the San 
Francisco law firm Farella, Braun & Martel, where he 
represent dozens of computer game developers, 
publishers, and Internet ventures. He is the author 
of the legal and finance chapters in the Ultimate 
Game Developers Sourcebook. His other relevant 
experience includes serving as a law clerk to two 
different U.S. Supreme Court Justices, performing 
standup comedy, forming a law firm's in-house ven- 
ture capital fund and being a first round investor in 
various entertainment software and Internet-orient- 
ed companies. 

MICHAEL GOLD 

Michael I. Gold became an OpenGL evangelist dur- 
ing his eight year stay at Silicon Graphics, Inc. where 
he contributed to the development of SGI's OpenGL 
for Windows. Michael is now a member of the 
OpenGL team at NVIDIA Corporation, and is an 
active participant on the OpenGL Architecture 
Review Board. 

ERICGOLDRERG 

Eric Goldberg is president of Crossover Technologies, 
a leading developer of multiuser games and simula- 
tions for the Internet. Crossover's titles include 
Evolution, President '96 and MadMaze, the first 
online game to draw one million players. Eric's indi- 
vidual body of work includes Paranoia, MadMaze, 
and The Tom Peters Business School in a Box. He is a 
three-time winner of the Origins Award (for best 
role-playing game of the year). He was previously 
president of West End Games, and currently serves 
on the boards of the New York New Media 
Association and the NYU Center for Advanced 
Digital Applications. His guilty pleasures include 
Missile Command, and the Strat-O-Matic Baseball 
board game. 



COMPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 




KEN GOLDSTEIN 

Ken Goldstein is Broderbund Software's vice presi- 
dent of entertainment and general manager of the 
company's Red Orb Entertainment division dedicated 
to developing and publishing CD-ROM and Internet 
games. Ken serves on the board of trustees of Full 
Circle Programs, a residential treatment and family 
services agency. 

JILLGOLDWORN 

Jill Goldworn joined Interplay Productions in 1992 to 
launch its OEM Division with one product, Battle 
Chess Enhanced, to license to the hardware commu- 
nity. Five years and a 22-member team later, Jill has 
built the most successful full-service entertainment 
OEM and Licensing organization in the industry. 
Under Jill's leadership, the success of Interplay's 
OEM division led to its spin off into a wholly owned 
subsidiary in early 1997. 

MIGUEL GOMEZ 

Miguel Gomez programmed aerodynamics and 
ground physics for PGA Tour Golf 96 and also pro- 
grammed aerodynamics, ground physics, ball/bat col- 
lision physics and Al for pitcher and batter in 
Microsoft Baseball 3D. 

JOSHOA GORDON 

Josh Gordon is a freelance game designer and pro- 
ducer. In the last five years he has worked with 
Acclaim, Electronic Arts, Sega, SegaSoft, Sony, and 
MetroLight Studios. Some of the titles Josh worked 
on include Xmen 2: Clone Wars, Congo, Pink 
Panther, Andre Aggasi Tennis, Batman and Robin. 
Josh and his partner, Steve Ross, are currently work- 
ing on an original design for Electronic Arts. 
Presently Josh is being played by Quake2, Tomb 
Raider2 and Asteroids. 

SHERIGRANERRAY 

Sheri Graner Ray started her career at in 1991 at 
Origin Systems as a writer and designer on the 
Ultima series. As director of product development at 
Her Interactive, Sheri's research on women's enter- 
tainment and computer games served as the basis 
for Her Interactive's design philosophies. Her work 
there placed Her Interactive at the forefront of the 
girls entertainment software market. 

ASHLEY GRAYSON 

Ashely Grayson founded Ashley Grayson Literary 
Agency (AGLA) in 1979 after he discovered the sci- 
ence fiction authors James P. Hogan and Dr. Robert 
L. Forward. Soon afterwards, he discovered, 
Christopher Pike "the Stephen King of Teen Fiction." 

DANIEL GREENBERG 

Daniel Greenberg is a Washington DC based game 
designer, writer, and producer. His latest computer 
game is Star Trek: Starfleet Academy, from Interplay, 
and his next game will be Battlespire from Bethesda 
Softworks. Daniel also writes on technology for the 
Washington Post, and covers government affairs for 
the Computer Game Developer's Association Report. 



JOHN GRIGSBY 

John Grisby was the lead programmer forT-Mek, 
released by Atari Games in 1994, and is a program- 
mer and project lead for Magic: the Gathering — 
Armageddon, due to be released in December 1997. 
Both titles involve simulation of human opponents. 

JOHNGWINNER 

John Gwinner helped introduce PC's, e-mail, and 
LAN's to the Marine Corps. Tired of moving, he 
founded VisNet Inc, and is contracted by one of the 
largest online services to build a 3D front end. He's 
worked on 3D and multiuser environments for over 
4 years, including VisMenu, a 3D desktop. John has 
been working with 3D API's for over 4 years. 

ERICHACHENBURG 

Erick Hachenburg joined TEN in April 1996 as vice 
president of business affairs and has recently 
assumed the role of president and CEO. Prior to join- 
ing Ten Eric practiced law for six years as an attorney 
specializing in intellectual property and corporate 
transactions with the firm of Fenwick & West LLP. 

TOM HALL 

A former co-founder of id, Tom Hall worked on id's 
early games including Commander Keen and 
Wolfenstein 3D. Tom went on an became an integral 
member of Apogee/3D Realms where he spearhead- 
ed the artistic direction on Rise of the Triad. Later, 
Tom became the lead designer for 3D Realms' yet- 
to-be-released Prey. Lured away by John Romero, 
Tom left the company to become a vice president at 
Ion Storm and lead game designer on Anachronox, a 
3D sci-fi role-playing game. 

JASON HALL 

Jason Hall is the CEO of Monolith Productions, a 
company dedicated to the development of extreme 
games for hard-core game purists around the globe. 

GARNER HALLORAN 

Garner Halloran was lead programmer on Emperor 
of the Fading Suns and worked on Final Liberation at 
Holistic Design. Now at Red Storm Entertainment, 
Garner is enjoying programming games in Java that 
he can't talk about. 

GREG HAMMOND 

Greg Hammond is the art director at Simutronics 
Corporation. While he currently works on real-time 
3D multiplayer games, in past lives he produced 
titles for Broderbund Software and LucasArts Games, 
as well as designing games independently for Sega 
and other small companies. Greg has been working 
in the entertainment software industry since 1981, 
when there were 6 colors and no one complained. 



TERRIHANNON 

A broad technical arts background has brought Terri 
Hannon to computer art and into 3D. Currently 
working at Vector Graphics, she is building real-time 
3D models, textures, animation and mapping. She is 
currently pondering a real-time 3D application that 
will bring about world peace. 

TOM HAYS 

Tom Hays has been developing sound for interactive 
applications professionally since 1990. He has served, 
as president of his company Big Sound, audio direc- ]} 
tor at Rocket Science Games, and is currently audio . 
director at NovaLogic. His credits as audio lead 
include Armored Fist II, F22 Raptor, Worlds Away, 
Rocket Jockey, and others. 

CHRIS HECKER 

Chris Hecker is far too busy working on his startup 
company, definition six, inc., to write a bio this year. 

JIM HEDGES 

Jim has worked in audio production for games for six I 
years, as a contractor, then with Neuromantic 
Productions before joining SegaSoft. He is currently 
in a long term contract with Crystal Dynamics. His 
work has included music composition and produc- 
tion on the PSX, Saturn, PC, Genesis, and SNES plat- 
forms. In addition, he has composed and pro- 
grammed interactive music for the PSX, and Saturn, 
as well as writing in one of the earliest interactive 
game music environments: GEMS for the Genesis. 

STEFAN HENRY BISKUP 

Stefan Henry-Biskup has spent the last five years in I 
the computer game industry. Previously, he worked 
in broadcast graphics as a 3D modeler/animator. 
Stefan is currently employed as a senior artist/lead 
modeler at Acclolade. He is working on a very char- 
acter rich title in which the models are a focal point. I 

ROGER HOLZBERG 

Roger Holzberg is currently creative director of 
Disney Interactive Entertainment where his responsi- 
bilities include supervising game and concept 
design. His product focus includes single player and 
multiplayer next generation games, PC CD- 
ROM/online hybrids and coin-op. Some properties on i 
which Roger has worked include the Theme Parks, 
Dalmations, Nightmare Ned, Bug's Life, and Tarzan. 
Previously, he was the executive producer/designer 
of Steven Spielberg's Director Chair for Dreamworks I 
Interactive and Pyramid: Challenge of a Pharoah's 
Dream, a co-adventure between Knowledge 
Adventure and Dreamquest Images. His other titles 
include My First Encyclpoedia, The Discoverers, 
Speed, and The Adventurers a digital kid's club. He 
serves on the advisory coards of the Conputer Game 
Developer's Conerence, Interactivity magazine, and 
the Writer's Guild of America's Creative Media and 
Technology committee. His design and production 
processes are featured in the books Multimedia 
Scriptwriting (Sybex) and Designing Multimedia 
Environments for Children (Wiley Computer 
Publishing). 







JIMMIE HOMBURG 

Jimmie Homburg is the president of Electric 
Paintbrush Inc., a company she founded with her son 
Dale in 1988. Electric Paintbrush creates art for sev- 
eral game development companies and publishers. 
Some of the games Jimmie has helped create are 
Harpoon and Air Warrior. Before entering the com- 
puter game business, Jimmie worked as a high 
school art teacher, jewelry designer, and a profes- 
sional parade float designer and builder. 

DALE HOMBURG 

Dale Homburg is vice president of Electric 
Paintbrush, Inc. His career as a digital artist began in 
1986, when he was fourteen, at Digital Illusions. 
There he produced artwork for several games includ- 
ing PT-109, Orbiter, Sub Battle Simulator and the 
original Reader Rabbit. His most recent game project 
was to produce cockpit images for Kesmai's Air 
Warrior. In addition to computer games, Dale also 
illustraits for the web and print. 

BRIAN HOOK 

Brian Hook is currently a programmer at id Software. 
He was introduced to the gaming industry when 
3Dfx Interactive hired him as their first software 
engineer. At 3Dfx he worked he on various tasks, the 
most notable being architecting, documenting, and 
implementing the first version of Glide, their popular 
hardware access API. After his tour of duty at 3Dfx 
he left to pursue contracting work, acquiring clients 
such as Trident Microsystems, Silicon Graphics, and 
NVidia. 

ROBERT HUEBNER 

Robert Huebner is a senior programmer at Blizzard 
Entertainment. His previous credits include Jedi 
KnightDark Forces 2 and Descent. 



Simon Hui is a member of the technical staff at 3Dfx 
Interactive, Inc. He currently works on implementing 
OpenGL for PC-based accelerators. Prior to joining 
3Dfx, Simon was at the Advanced Systems Division 
at Silicon Graphics Inc., where he worked on the 
OpenGL implementations for RealityEngine and 
InfiniteReality. He was also on the original OpenGL 
team at SGI, as well as the group responsible for IRIS 
Performer, a real-time graphics toolkit layered on 
OpenGL. 

STEVE JACKSON 

Steve Jackson has been designing games profession- 
ally since 1976. Since 1980, he's run his own game 
publishing company. His best-known creations 
include Car Wars, Ogre, GURPS, lluminati and Killer. 
He is now involved in several multimedia and online 
projects some of which are adaptations of his exist- 
ing properties, while others are brand new. 

MICAH JACKSON 

Like many in this business, Micah began as a player. 
Realizing that it is difficult to make money in gam- 
ing, but unthinkable to make money doing anything 
else, he began to seek work in the industry. He has 



worked for many years in various capacities for 
Virtual World Entertainment and VictorMaxx 
Technologies. He is currently the director of licensing 
and new media for Steve Jackson Games. 

BRIAN JAMISON 

Brian Jamison has led the Jamison/Gold team in cre- 
ating and developing innovative, interactive and truly 
breakthrough technologies for web based promo- 
tions of game titles, entertainment and corporate 
properties. Some of the game promotions spear- 
headed by Jamison include PaRappa, Crash 
Bandicoot, Crash2,Tekken2,Tekken3, Nightmare 
Creatures, Vigilance, and Bushido Blade. 

ALEXANDRE JEAN CLAUDE 

Alexandre Jean Claude is a software design engi- 
neer for the games group at Softimage. He is 
involved in the development of console converters 
(N64/PSX), on-target viewers as well as the GDK 
product. He usually drinks his coffee with no cream 
and four sugars. 

LYNELL JINKS 

Lynell Jinks is a computer artist for Vector Graphics. 
Since the age of 1 7, his art has been published in 
newspapers and magazines such as Game Developer 
and the Oakland Tribune. His specialty is character 
design and photo-realistic textures. Although he is in 
the early stages of his career, his goal is to one day 
be recognized as one of the top artists in the game 
industry. 

JIM KENNEDY 

James M. Kennedy is vice president of business 
affairs at Electronic Arts Inc. 

MARKKILGARD 

Mark Kilgard is a system software engineer at 
NVIDIA Corporation. He wrote the book 
Programming OpenGL for the X Window System and 
numerous technical and tutorial articles on program- 
ming and implementing OpenGL. Mark created the 
popular OpenGL Utility Toolkit (GLUT), a portable 
OpenGL windowing library. In a previous life at 
Silicon Graphics, Mark worked on OpenGL window 
system integration and SGI's high-end InfiniteReality 
graphics hardware. Mark has taught courses on 
OpenGL at SIGGRAPH and several other technical 
conferences. His karaoke version of Dolly Parton's 9 
to 5 can't be beat. 

scon KIM 

Scott Kim is an independent puzzle designer. His 
recent work includes puzzle design for the graphic 
adventure game Obsidian, the online board game 
MetaSquares, SmartGames Collection 2, Shockwave 
games for the SegaSoft web site, and the education- 
al CD-ROM VizAbility. He writes a monthly puzzle for 
NewMedia magazine, and has also created puzzles 
for Scientific American, Games, and Discover maga- 
zines. He is the author of the book Inversions, and 
coordinates a mailing list for puzzle game designers 
through his web site www.scottkim.com. 



AMY JO KIM 

Amy Jo Kim, Ph.D., is a leading expert in the field of 
online community design, and has been involved in 
the design of several top gaming communities, 
including Mplayer and CyberPark. Amy Jo is the 
founder and creative director of NAIMA, a 2 1 st cen- 
tury design studio that has designed online environ- 
ments for a wide range of clients, including America 
Online, Adobe, AT&T, CyberCash, Electric 
Communities, Fujitsu, Mpath Interactive, MTV, 
NetNoir, Nickelodeon, Oracle, Paramount, PlaceWare, 
Redgate, Viacom, and YAHOO. Amy Jo also teaches 
online community design at Stanford University, and 
is working on a book about timeless principles of 
community design. 

MELIANTHEKINES 

Melianthe Kines is a freelance interactive director 
and producer with extensive experience in motion 
capture production. As an interactive director at 
Acclaim Entertainment from 1994 to 1996, she 
planned and directed motion capture and Ultimatte 
production of game content. She directed the com- 
pany's first 3D sports and first 3D fighting games 
using its proprietary motion capture technology. She 
has directed all kinds of talent, including profession- 
al athletes, wrestlers, and stuntmen, and has over 
ten years of experience in both interactive and 
broadcast media. Her current clients include: 
Electronic Arts, Acclaim Entertainment, and GT 
Interactive. 

NEILKIRBY 

Neil Kirby is a member of technical staff at Bell 
Laboratories, the R&D arm of Lucent Technologies. 
His previous assignment was building speech recog- 
nition software. Currently he helps make operations 
and support systems for telcos of the world. In his 
spare time he designs multiplayer, tactical combat 
computer games. He especially enjoys writing pro- 
grams for computer opponents that play well with- 
out cheating. 

DAVID KIRK 

David Kirk brings more than 18 years of experience 
in 3D graphics hardware and software architecture 
and design. At NVIDIA, he is responsible for develop- 
ing advanced consumer 3D architectures and algo- 
rithms. Previously, he was chief scientist at Crystal 
Dynamics, one of the most advanced software enter- 
tainment developers for game consoles. Before join- 
ing Crystal Dynamics, Kirk co-architected the graph- 
ics subsystem for the Apollo DN 1 0OOOVS worksta- 
tion, and was the principal engineer for 3D graphics 
hardware for Raster Technologies. 

ERIC KLEIN 

Eric Klein recently left his role as director of new 
business development at Bungie Software for a brief 
"recharge period." While at Bungie, he was respon- 
sible for licensing, publishing, business development, 
international business, and technology integration at 
Bungie. In a past life Eric was Apple's game evange- 
list, so cross platform development actually means 
something to him. 



COMPUTER GAME DEVELOP 





CHARLES KRAMER 

Charles B. Kramer is a member of the New York and 
Illinois bars, and has practiced law in New York since 
1982. His practice includes corporate, copyright, and 
trademark law, including for game developers, game 
publishers and information service providers. He has 
graduate law degrees in intellectual property (New 
York University, LL.M. 1984) and international law 
(McGeorge European Program 1983). Charles has 
written numerous articles on interactive business 
legal issues in such magazines as Miller Freeman's 
InterActivity. 

MICHEL KRIPALANI 

Michel Kripalani is the CEO/president of Presto 
Studios, developers of The Journeyman Project series 
of photorealistic adventure games. In addition to 
being the executive producer for Gundam 0079, 
Pegasus Prime and The Journeyman Project 3, he 
was the technical director of video for The 
Journeyman Project 3. 

JOHN LAIRD 

John E. Laird is an associate professor of electrical 
engineering and computer science at the University 
of Michigan and is director of its artificial intelli- 
gence laboratory. From 1984 to 1986 he was a 
member of research staff at Xerox Palo Alto 
Research Center. His research has centered on Soar, 
a rule-based Al architecture for building general 
intelligent systems. He is also involved with comput- 
er games, teaching a senior-level undergraduate 
course on computer game development. 

JEFF LANDER 

Jeff Lander is a digital evolutionist with Darwin 3D, a 
company geared toward a higher adaptation of real- 
time 3D graphics. Jeff has worked as a solution 
provider for 10 years in the video game, television, 
and film arenas where he has developed several 
real-time graphic applications. He has written his 
applications both engines and tools, with an empha- 
sis on cross-platform development as well as specific 
custom plug-ins for high-end animation software. 

TODD LANEY 

Todd Laney has worked at Microsoft for eleven 
years, and on the Flight Simulator graphics engine 
for the last two. 

MITCH LASKY 

Mitch Lasky is senior vice president of Activision 
Studios, and is responsible for all third party publish- 
ing and product acquisitions as well as managing 
Raven Software, Activision's newly acquired studio. 
Since joining Activision in 1996, he has published 
such industry-leading products as Blood Omen: 
Legacy of Kain, Hexen II, Quake II, Sin, GT Racing 
'98, Nightmare Creatures, Netstorm and Fighter 
Squadron. Prior to joining Activision, he founded 
Serum Corp., a designer and developer of multiplay- 
er, Internet-based games. 



JOHN LAT1A 

Dr. John Latta has been involved in computers, sys- 
tems engineering and entrepreneurial efforts for the 
last 25 years. As president of 4th Wave, John ana- 
lyzes the technologies of 3D, multimedia, personal 
computers, entertainment and virtual reality. He is 
also the editor-in-chief of the WAVE Report, an elec- 
tronic newsletter which covers 3D, multimedia and 
shared environments. 

KATHERINE LAWRENCE 

Reaching for the "Stratosphere" with her own 
unique "BattleVision" — that's how Katherine 
Lawrence looks at her credits list which spans media 
from bytes to video/film to print. Though she has 
written "soft"for things such as Jim Henson's 
Muppet Babies, the majority of her credits are defi- 
nitely action oriented, including ReBoot, Gl Joe 
Extreme, and This Means War! In 1997, she received 
a nomination from the Writers Guild of America for 
an episode of the ABC series Hypernauts. 

NICOLE LAZZARO 

Nicole Lazzaro is president XEODesign, Inc and has 
for eight years combined her video production and 
cognitive psychology background with her knowl- 
edge of origami, HyperCard and the company Xerox 
machine to save money and create trend-setting 
designs. Her Rapid Prototypes built blueprints of 3D 
worlds for Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing and How 
Multimedia Computers Work, as well as the 
explorable Virtual Seminar interface for Your Mythic 
Journey. She has prototyped for numerous compa- 
nies including Broderbund, Mindscape, Maxis, The 
Learning Company, and Oracle. 

SUSAN LEE MERROW 

Susan Lee-Merrow is currently under contract with 
Lucas Learning (who's that?) to direct their sales and 
marketing effort. Susan spent the previous seven 
years heading up the marketing for Broderbund's 
entertainment and education products and then was 
VP marketing at Living Books. She has been in the 
software industry since 1981, when games were sold 
in baggies, hanging off pegboards. She has been on 
both the marketing and development side, including 
doing a stint as a producer at EA in its very early 
days. 

GARY LEVENBERG 

Gary Levenberg is the executive producer for 
Interactive Audio and has been producing music and 
soundtracks for new and traditional media for over 
10 years. He is a recognized expert in the area of 
digital audio for multimedia. Gary has also produced 
a number of CD-ROM titles including Interactive 
Audio's own award-winning Rock, Rap 'n Roll. 

PAUL LEWIS 

Paul Lewis has worked in 3D computer graphics for 
over 1 7 years, covering a variety of dissiplines. An 
animator with a software and systems engineering 
background, Paul develops animation tools and 
approaches for creating interactive content. 



ANDREW LUNSTAD 

Andrew Lunstad is founder and keeper of the ham- 
mer at Fenris Wolf. He started the company four 
years ago with a friend he "wasted" his youth play- 
ing computer games with, and now heads the tech- 
nical side of development for the company. Although 
he now spends much of his time managing other 
programmers, he still finds the time to write code. 
Under his direction, Fenris Wolf has built a reputa- 
tion for state of the art technology. 

CHRISTY MARX 

Christy Marx has experience creating, writing and/or 
story editing television series, eel animatin, cgi ani- 
mation, comic books, movies, and computer games. 
Her credits include such shows as Twilight Zone, 
Babylon 5, Hypernauts, Spider-Man, G.I. Joe, Jem, 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Conan the Adventurer, . 
ReBoot, Beast Wars and many others. Her writing 
experience covers various forms of linear and non- 
linear media, and adapting concepts and characters 
form one medium to another. 

CATHRYN MATAGA 

Cathryn Mataga has worked in computer games 
since 1982. Her credits include Shamus, Neverwinter 
Nights, Darksun Online, Mindwheel and Stronghold. 
She is a partner at Junglevision Software. 

BRUCE MAXIMOV 

Bruce Maximov is a partner in the San Francisco law 
firm of Farella Braun & Martel LLP, and chairs the 
firm's Start-up and Emerging Growth Business Group 
and its Multimedia Practice Group. His practice con- 
centrates on advising and assisting entrepreneurs 
and enterprises in the software, multimedia and 
other technology industries, with special emphasis 
on start-up and early stage companies. Bruce also 
serves on the Capital and Business Services 
Committee of the Multimedia Development Group, 
and is an adjunct professor of federal securities reg- 
ulation at Golden Gate School of Law. 

CONRAD MAXWELL 

Conrad Maxwell was recently at VLSI Technology 
managing their investment into audio and multime- 
dia technology. He is now with Rockwell 
Semiconductor, and the manager of technology plan- 
ning for audio.He has been published in a technolo- 
gy textbook and has a patent pending. He is also the 
chairman of the Interactive Audio SIG -Three 
Dimensional Working Group. 

RACHEL MCCALLISTER 

Rachel McCallister is present and co-founder of 
KillerApp Communciations, the first agency created 
to provide public relations and promotions specifical- 
ly for interactive entertainment and communications 
companies and their products. 

JIM MCCARTHY 

Jim McCarthy has been a software guy for 20 years. 
He wrote the book Dynamics of Software 
Development in 1995. Many thousands of software 
people like it, and a few don't. Jim's gives talks and 






i 



teaches all over the world. He used to work at 
Microsoft where he was the product unit manager of 
the Visual C++ , starting right after C7 shipped, and 
continuing on until 1995. Now he works as a part of 
a team at McCarthy TeamworX. They have been busy 
the last three years researching the nature of team 
dynamics and have some truly cool discoveries and 
practices they've developed while simulating (with a 
thousand or so developers, in sixty some teams) 
complete team and product development cycles. 

STASIA MCGEHEE 

Stasia's background is in fine arts. In 1988 she got a 
BFA in painting at Memphis College of Art focusing 
on landscapes, figure studies, and drawing animals 
at the nearby zoo, which proved relevant to her later 
work animating monsters for game environments. In 
1992 she moved to the Bay Area and began working 
as a character animator. From 1994 to 1997 she 
worked for OnLive! Technologies, creating avatars, 
low polygon characters that represent users on the 
Internet. 

GARY MCTAGGART 

Gary McTaggart is working on a next generation 
game engine at Ritual Entertainment named 
UberEngine. Gary attended the University of Florida 
and is a former employee of 3Dfx Interactive. 

STEVE MERETZKY 

Steve Meretzky has designed and directed 15 
games, first at Infocom and most recently as a co- 
founder of Boffo Games. His most recent game is The 
Space Bar. His other titles include Planetfall, Leather 
Goddesses of Phobos, Zork Zero, Superhero League 
of Hoboken, Hodj 'n' Podj, and The Hitchhiker's 
Guide to the Galaxy (co-authored with Douglas 
Adams). In addition to creating his own games, 
Steve has been a "design doctor", consulting on 
numerous other game development projects. 

CAROLYN MILLER 

Carolyn Miller specializes in children's interactive 
projects and has worked on over 1 5 new media 
titles. Carolyn is an instructor at UCLA Extension 
teaching, designing and writing interactive projects 
for children. She has worked on the following either 
as a writer or writer-designer: The Toy Story 
Animated StoryBook; Where in the USA is Carmen 
Sandiego?;The Pocahontas Animated StoryBook. 

MARK MILLER 

Mark Steven Miller has been producing audio for 
interactive media since 1989 when he founded 
Neuromantic Productions. Neuromantic Productions 
produced audio for cutting edge ROM and CD-ROM 
titles for publishers such as Sega, Acclaim, Electronic 
Arts and Virgin Interactive Entertainment. Since leav- 
ing Neuromantic in 1994, Mark has served as audio 
director for Sega of America, the audio and video 
director for Crystal Dynamics, and the co-chairman 
of the Interactive Audio Special Interest Group. In all 
Mark has produced audio for over 80 titles. 
Currently, Mark is the senior product development 
producer for Harmonix Music Systems in Cambridge, 



MA. Mark is a frequent writer and public speaker on 
the topic of interactive audio technology and holds 
positions on the advisory boards of the Computer 
Game Developers Conference, Game Developer and 
The Music and Technology Exposition. 

JOE MINTON 

Joe Minton is an owner of Cyberlore Studios, Inc. He 
managed the company's growth from a one to a 
three team development house. Joe pitches the com- 
pany's game concepts to publishers, produces all of 
Cyberlore 's titles and is the key contact for its pub- 
lishers. He has experience working with a variety of 
different publishers, including Accolade, GT, Blizzard, 
Psygnosis, 3DO, and SSI. 

BRIAN MORIARTY 

Professor Brian Moriarty wrote three of the original 
Infocom prose adventures, Wishbringer, Trinity and 
Beyond Zork. His first graphic adventure, Loom, was 
published by Lucasfilm Games. He collaborated with 
Ron Cobb on the design of Loadstar: The Legend of 
Tully Bodine for Rocket Science Games, and is enig- 
matically credited with Additional Additional Story 
for Steven Spielberg's The Dig. He is co-founder and 
head of game design at Mpath Interactive, a compa- 
ny enabling social interaction on the world wide 
web. 

ANDREW MOUND 

Andrew Mound received an MBA in casino gaming 
through a specialized program at Indiana University 
Bloomington and University of Nevada Reno's 
Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial 
Gaming. He is the product manager for video slot 
games at Shuffle Master Gaming. He is currently 
involved in new video game R&D for several games 
to be released in a joint venture between Shuffle 
Master and International Game Technology (IGT). 

MARK NADESKI 

Mark Nadeski works for Texas Instruments in the 
DSP Multimedia Applications Group. He has been 
working with audio for the last three years. He is a 
member of the MMA and a participant in several of 
it's Interactive Audio Special Interest Groups. Among 
these is the Platform Development Working Group, 
which supplied the foundation for his presentation 

MARGO NANNY 

Margo Nanny started as a middle school math 
games teacher. In 1987, she turned Disney's Donald 
in Mathmagic Land into an early HyperCard/video- 
disk prototype. She became a founding member of 
Apple's Multimedia Lab where she designed activi- 
ties for the Visual Almanac, authored CountDown 
and Planetary Taxi for Voyager Co., and co-designed 
SimTown for Maxis. She was involved in Broder- 
bund's Math Workshop, and was designer/producer 
of a kid's code cracking product, Top Secret Decoder. 

DAVID NATHANIELSZ 

David Nathanielsz came to Jellyvision in January of 
1 996 as a writer for You Don't Know Jack. He has 
written for You Don't Know Jack XL, Sports, Volume 



2, and Movies, and served as head writer/senior edi- 
tor for Volume 3 and The Net Show. David is also a 
founding member of Step Right Up Productions, a 
theater production company that produces plays, 
musicals, and long-form impov comedy shows. David 
claims he's British, but everyone else thinks he's 
lying. 

RRUCENAYLOR 

Bruce Naylor is currently CEO/CTO of Spatial Labs 
Inc., a provider of high performance virtual world 
technology to game developers. Spatial Labs was co- 
founded in 1996 by Bruce after a 10 year career at 
Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ. During that time, Bruce 
furthered substantially the development of BSP Trees 
as an important geometric computing technology. 
Much of this work appeared in research publications, 
such as the annual Siggraph Proceedings. 

YU-SHEN NG 

Yu-Shen Ng works with game developers to develop 
games and gaming services for the Internet. Yu-Shen 
assists Mpath Interactive's partners in planning and 
implementing their online services. 

LARRY O'BRIEN 

Larry O'Brien was the founding editor of Game 
Developer magazine and was the first non-Sun 
employee to write a technical article on Java. In 
1 996, he left the publishing world to develop a mas- 
sive, multiuser Internet themepark based on Java 
technology. He teaches advanced courses on Java 
design and implementation and was the developer 
of the Hands-On Java training CD-ROM, which is 
available from www.altnetinc.com. 

MARTIN O'DONNELL 

Since 1982, Martin O'Donnell has been president of 
O'Donnell/Salvatori in Chicago. He has worked as 
composer, performer, and producer for this award- 
winning music and sound design production compa- 
ny, creating total audio environments for film, televi- 
sion, and interactive media. Titles produced in 1997 
include Riven, the Sequel to Myst and Myth: the 
Fallen Lords. 

DAVID O'NEAL 

David O'Neal is an audio specialist at Electronic Arts, 
focused on developing EA's interactive music soft- 
ware and composing interactive music for titles such 
as Soviet Strike and Nuclear Strike. 

JOHN NEIL 

For over ten years, John O'Neil has designed, writ- 
ten, and produced numerous live-action games in a 
variety of genres. He was the editor of the field's 
most influential journal Metagame from 1987 to 
1992. 

erik on 

Erik Ott works for Rainmaker Capital, LLC, a man- 
agement consulting firm specializing in capital pro- 
curement for small and medium sized private com- 
panies. The principals have been on both sides of the 
negotiating table, raising capital for their own busi- 



IPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS' CONFERENCE 





nesses and representing venture capital investment 
in emerging growth companies. This experience has 
equipped RCG with a variety of capital sources and a 
clear understanding of how to communicate a com- 
pany's vision to prospective investors. 

KIRK OWEN 

As an agent at Octagon, Kirk Owen has arranged 
publishing deals for Octagon's clients in the US, 
Great Britain, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Germany, 
Japan, Latin America and Korea. He has licensed 
content to major publishers including Ocean, 
Funsoft, Fujitsu, Sir-Tech, Synergy, Bomico, Samsung, 
Leader, and Anaya. Octagon Entertainment is the 
preeminent agency serving the digital entertainment 
community. Octagon's clients include leading pub- 
lishers and developers such as Crack dot Com, 
Simon & Schuster Interactive, Bungie, Viridis, 
SmartGames and Ravensburger Interactive. 

ALEXEY PAJITNOV 

Alexey Pajitnov is 43-year old puzzle game designer. 
He started in 1985 with the well known Tetris, which 
has sold in 40 million copies and continued with 
Hatris, Knight Moves, El-Fish, Ice & Fire. Recently, 
Alexey joined Microsoft and developed the Microsoft 
Entertainment Pack -The Puzzle Collection and the 
MSN puzzle show, Mind Aerobics. 

SAM PALAHNUK 

Sam Palahnuk is a 1 7 year veteran of the interactive 
industry having designed, produced and shipped 
more than 22 games, including the hit arcade Star 
Trek game, The Disney Animation Studio, Mickey's 
123's, Wolf and other products that have earned 
Software Publisher Association Gold and Platinum 
awards for sales of over 100,000 and 250,000 units 
respectively. Currently, Sam is executive producer 
with Prolific Software. 

KIM PALLISTER 

Kim Pallister is a technical marketing engineer and 
lead processor evangelist for Intel's developer rela- 
tions group. 

JON PEDDIE 

Jon Peddie is one of the pioneers of the graphics 
industry, starting his career in computer graphics in 
1 962. After the successful launch of several graphics 
manufacturing companies, Jon began JPA in 1984 to 
provide comprehensive data, information and man- 
agement expertise to the computer graphics indus- 
try. He lectures at numerous conferences and on top- 
ics pertaining to graphics technology and the emerg- 
ing trends in digital media technology. He is fre- 
quently quoted in trade and business publications, 
and contributes articles to numerous publications 
and is the author of several books. 

PAUL PEDRIANA 

Paul Pedriana has been programming games in C++ 
since it was first available on PCs. He has been at 
Maxis for two years and has recently worked on 
SimCopter and is currently a lead programmer on 
SimCity 3000. He's an expert on C++ and is current- 



ly working on a book on high performance C++ pro- 
gramming. He's active in the game programming 
community and is one of the authors of the gamedev 
FAQ. 

JIM PERKINS 

As senior vice president, artists & repertoire at GT 
Interactive, Jim Perkins is responsible for seeking out 
new game design talent and acquiring new software 
content and technologies. He was president of 
Scottsdale, AZ-based FormGen until the company 
was acquired by GT Interactive in 1996. His success 
in building FormGen into a top game publisher was 
highlighted by discovering and publishing such top 
developers as id Software, Apogee Software, 
Terminal Reality, Cyberlore and Epic MegaGames. 

MICHAEL "SAXS" PERRSON 

Michael "Saxs" Perrson originally came from the 
Scandinavian demo scene before being picked up by 
the now extinct Scavenger, where he developed Sega 
titles for over three years. He then went to start at 
Shiny where he is currently leading Team Ego in the 
hard work of making Messiah, the 3D title to look 
forward to in 1998. He believes in innovation, not 
stagnation, which seems to be the industry standard 
these days. Saxs is always controversial but a family 
man at heart. 

MARK PIERCE 

In the early Macintosh market, Mark Pirece was the 
designer/animator of Dark Castle and Beyond Dark 
Castle. He was one of the founders of MacroMind 
(now MacroMedia) and co-authored VideoWorks 
(now known as Director). Prior to these accomplish- 
ments he spent his post-art school days porting 
games to crucial platforms like Coleco-Vision and 
Winter Games to the Mac. He also co-designed/co- 
programmed and animated Bally's coin-op video 
Professor Pac-Man. For the past four and a half years 
he has been senior vice president of coin-op product 
development/ executive producer at Atari Games. 
During his tenure as VP he and his design groups 
have delivered Primal Rage, T-Mek, Hoop It Up, Area 
51, Wayne Gretzky 3D Hockey, San Francisco Rush, 
Maximum Force, Mace, Rush the Rock and California 
Speed. 

TODD PORTER 

As president and founder of Ion Storm, Todd Porter 
designed both the business plan and design docu- 
ments they used to secure over $20 million in 
advances from Eidos Interactive. Todd has been a 
game designer at Origin, SSI, 7th Level, and now has 
finished G-Nome, is finishing Dominion and begin- 
ning Doppelganger. 

MATTPRITCHARD 

Matt Pritchard is a developer, author, and family man 
who enjoys living his life as a somewhat whimsical 
modern renaissance man. With a passion for game 
development that harkens back to the earliest days 
of personal computers, he currently can be found at 
Ensemble Studios, where he helped develop the 
smash PC hit, Age of Empires and is busy working 



on the next generation of strategy games. If that 
wasn't enough he has regularly written articles for 
Game Developer magazine, sharing his knowledge 
of graphics, algorithms, and optimizations with oth- 
ers, and is rumored to have a book under develop- 
ment. Or was that a record deal? When not engaged 
on the cutting edge of gaming he can usually be 
found at home spending quality time with his lovely 
wife, energetic dog, and room full of antique com- 
puter games. 

LEONARD C. QUAM 

Leonard Quam is vice president of product develop- 
ment for Crossover Technologies, a leading producer 
of online games based in New York. Leonard joined 
the company in 1990, and in 1992 produced The 
Next President, an election simulation on Prodigy 
which was played by over 250,000 people. Since 
1995, he has overseen all of Crossover's projects, 
including Reinventing America I and II, President '96, 
and Evolution. 






MEGAN QUATTROCCHI 

Megan Quattrocchi is the general manager of a third 
party hardware compatibility testing company 
named CGS Testing, 

OCEAN QUIGLEY 

Ocean Quigley has been a 3D artist since the mid 
80s. He's been at Maxis for two years and is current- 
ly art directing SimCity 3000. 

STEVE RADIN 

Steve Rabin has worked as the primary Al program- 
mer for two sports titles, Activision's Hyperblade and 
Microsoft's Baseball 3D. 

MARK RADCLIFF 

Mark Radcliff is a partner with Gray Cary Ware & 
Freidenrich in the Intellectual Property and 
Technology Practice Group. In April 1997, he was 
named one of the 100 Most Influential Lawyers in 
the United States by The National Law Journal. 

JOHN RAE GRANT 

John Rae-Grant is a former founding partner of 
McCarthy TeamworX, and a ten-year Microsoft veter- 
an. While at Microsoft, John participated in numer- 
ous software development tool projects as a devel- 
oper, program manager, quality assurance manager, 
development manager and general manager. As QA 
manager for Visual C++ from version 1.5 through 
2.1, John oversaw the evolution ofVC++'s shipping 
cycle from one product per eighteen months to a 
minimum of one multiple language product per four 
months. John's final position at Microsoft was as 
business unit manager of the Microsoft Developer 
Network (MSDN), where he managed MSDN's 
emerging use of the web. At TeamworX, John was 
the director of training, and the primary designer of 
Software Development Bootcamp. John recently 
founded The Art of Work, a consulting and training 
company which specializes in bootstrapping teams 
and organizations to create functional art on time. 






$ 



OMIO RAHMAT 

Omid Rahmat is the principal wordsmith at Doodah, 
a business name that only he may find amusing, and 
his wife beleives will lead them to Penury (a small 
retirement resort off the coast of Madagascar). Omid 
provides all manner of writing services for those in 
the computer industry willing to overcome their 
reluctance to associate themselves with a business 
called Doodah. He writes for numerous trade publi- 
cations, as well as doing private market analysis for 
companies willing to pay him exorbitant amounts of 
money or make promises of same. In addition, he 
flexes his funny bone writing copy for web sites, 
packaging, brochures, advertising, and PR cam- 
paigns. Wherever words of wisdom and wit are 
required, Doodah is there. Someday, Omid hopes to 
form the Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny Yellow Polka Dot 
Bikini Corporation, when he has employees, money, 
clients, or when he takes his mortgage payments 
seriously. If you've read this far, you know far too 
much about the man and his business. 

DARREN REID 

Darren Reid is the lead instructor for NBCC 
Miramichi's two year electronic game design pro- 
gram. His checkered past includes stints as a profes- 
sional photographer and graphic artist. In 1989, he 
left his job at a publishing house to form one of New 
Brunswick's first computer multimedia companies, 
Innovision. He is an award-winning animator and 
producer, as well as an experienced programmer. He 
has way too many hobbies for a grown man, and 
reads too much. His office is considered one of the 
finest examples of the sedimentary layer horizontal 
file system, and his door is always open. Currently, 
he is the lead artist for HPS's Defending the Reich. 

ALISON RICHARDS 

Alison Richards manages Intel's worldwide software 
marketing program in the developer relations/con- 
tent group. In this position, Alison is responsible for 
assisting consumer software developers to enter new 
emerging markets, such as China, Brazil and India, as 
well worldwide synchronization and software mar- 
keting efforts between Europe, Japan and APAC. 

ANDY RIFKIIM 

Andy Rifkin is senior vice president of design and 
development for Mattel Media and senior vice presi- 
dent of technology for Mattel. He 
oversees the concept development, design process 
and technical development of all Mattel Media 
products. He evaluates new and existing technolo- 
gies and coordinates the conceptual process 
between the Mattel Media design and develop- 
ment groups. 

LANEROATHE 

Lane has been developing software for over fifteen 
years. He has worked on over 100 software titles, 
such as V for Victory, Theatre of War and Dark 
Castle. In addition to working on titles for compa- 
nies like Interplay, Corel, Viacom, Three-Sixty Pacific, 
and Infocom, Lane has started several software 
companies. 



DAVID RORERTS 

David Roberts works at Radical Entertainment in 
Vancouver, Canada. He has a degree in electrical 
engineering and has been a full time video game 
programmer for the last five years. He has worked on 
products for the Gameboy, Super Nintendo, Sega 
Genesis, and most recently the NHL Powerplay hock- 
ey games for the Sony Playstation, Sega Saturn and 
PC platforms. David hopes to one day make it big 
and buy non-disposable furniture. 

MIKEROTENRERG 

Mike Rotenberg is one of only a few professional 
market researchers who is both experienced and 
comfortable with the world of computer, online and 
video games. He is founder and president of 
WiseWorks, a consumer research firm specialized in 
the New Media and multimedia industries since 
1989. 

MATTSAETTLER 

Matt Saettler has been in the computer industry for 
over 1 5 years. Previously, he worked at Microsoft for 
9 years on projects ranging from the first CD-ROM 
product (Bookshelf) to Interactive Television. Prior to 
ITV, he worked on the multimedia extensions to 
Windows and Video for Windows. Currently, he is 
responsible for the projects at Monolith Productions 
and has or is Producing Blood, Blood 2 and 
DirectArcadefortheAMOA. 

GEORGE SANGER 

The Legendary Col. Fat Man is the biggest name in 
music for multimedia, and getting bigger all the 
time. Along with Team Fat, his team of cowboy com- 
posers, he has provided music for over 1 20 games, 
many of them representing important firsts in game 
sound. His credits include Wing Commander I and II, 
The 7th Guest, Tanarus, ATF, Master of Magic, and 
Putt Putt Saves the Zoo. 

PHILSAONDERS 

Phil Saunders is the creative director of Presto 
Studios, and has been involved in game design and 
production since 1992. Most recently he was pre- 
production director and video director for The 
Journeyman Project 3: Legacy of Time, for which he 
also produced a ton of storyboards and designs. Phil 
has a background in creative visualization and 
industrial design for such diverse fields as film, loca- 
tion-based entertainment, product design and the 
automotive industry. 

DANSCHERLIS 

As Turbine's president, Dan Scherlis is producing 
Asheron's Call for Microsoft's Internet Gaming 
Zone. Dan was previously director of new product 
development at Internet publisher AT&T New 
Media. As executive vice president of Papyrus, now 
of CUC/Sierra, Dan led game development, estab- 
lished a publishing capability, and produced three 
games, including IndyCar Racing. 



RRIAN SCHMIDT 

Brian Schmidt has been a consultant to the multime- 
dia audio industry for 1 years, having written music 
created sound effects for over 100 titles including 
John Madden Football, Desert Strike, The X-files and 
Jurassic Park. In addition to creating music and other 
audio content, he assists in the development of new 
audio systems and drivers, and is a frequent lecturer 
on multimedia and 3D audio. He currently serves as 
director of technology for QSound Labs. 



CURRENT AND 
FUTURE INFO ON 

THE WEB @ 
WWW.C6DC.COM 



PETE SCHNEIDER 

For the past nine years, Pete Schneider has been 
involved in the creation and maintenance of multi- 
media applications and tools. After achieving a self- 
designed degree in computers and electronic music 
at Morthwwestern University, Pete took on projects 
as a test engineer in both the Consumer and 
Multimedia Systems Division at Microsoft, creating 
automated test suites, test cases and plans. At 
Dreamworks Interactive, Pete added the duties of 
test lead to his skills before coming to ST Labs. Pete 
heads up the games team at ST labs and oversees 
several projects each month, creates test stratetgies 
and plans, and maintains doily communication and 
delivery of bug reports with each client. 

GLENSCHOFIELD 

Glen Schofield the project team director for GEX: 
Enter the Gecko, came to Crystal Dynamics over a 
year ago with 7 years of industry experience and 12 
years of experience in character development. Prior 
to joining Crystal Dynamics, Glen was the art director 
for Capcom USA where he was responsible for build- 
ing Capcom's in-house art department. He was also 
the art director at AbsoluteEntertainment where he 
was involved with projects such as Ren & Stimpy for 
the Genesis and SNES and Bart Simpson for the 
Genesisand SNES. 

PAUL SCHUYTEMA 

Paul Schuytema has been interested in computers 
ever since he got his first TRS-80 back in 1 977. He 
began as a programmer, but shifted gears rapidly in 
college, out of fear that he would end up writing 
COBOL code for the rest of his life. Over the last 
handful of years, he was a professor at Monmouth 
College and contributing game design editor for 
Computer Gaming World magazine. He worked as 
lead designer of MechWarrior 3, until he was lured 
into the Texas snake pit and is currently holed-up 



IPUTER GAME DEVELOPERS CONFERENCE 





just outside of Dallas, serving as the project leader 
for Prey, an action game from 3D Realms. 

DONSEEGMILLER 

Don Seegmiller is a fine artist turned digital. He has 
more than 500 oil paintings in public and private 
collections nationwide. He has had articles written 
on his work in all major western art magazines 
including Southwest Art and Art West. Two years 
ago, he made a partial switch to digital art. He is 
currently art director for Saffire Corporation. His 
recent games include Legends 98 and Bomberman. 

HARALD SEELEY 

Harald Seeley has been a programmer, producer, 
technical director, and game designer in addition to 
managing his own software development company. 
With over 1 1 years of experience in computer game 
development, his most recent role has been as senior 
technical producer for Electronic Arts, where he has 
been involved with such projects as John Madden 
Football and Andretti Racing on multiple platforms, 
as well as the online version of PGA Tour. 

MIKE SELLERS 

Michael Sellers is working on advancing the state of 
real communities on the Internet with his company, 
Online Alchemy. Michael co-founded Archetype 
Interactive in 1995 (later acquired by 3DO) and was 
the original game designer for Meridian 59. Prior to 
that Michael was a user-centered design consultant 
and programmer. He has a degree in cognitive sci- 
ence, and continues to be fascinated by the psycho- 
logical and social aspects of computer use, particu- 
larly in areas that are supposed to be fun. 

JASON SHANKEL 

Jason Shankel has been a professional game pro- 
grammer for five years, having worked for the last 
three years at Maxis. While at Maxis, he led the 
development of the SimCity Urban Renewal Kit, 
SimCity 2000 Network Edition and the upcoming 
Streets of SimCity. SimCity 2000 Network Edition 
and Streets of SimCity are both multiplayer network 
games. 

SCOn SHANNON 

Scott Shannon is the publisher of Pocket Book's 
highly successful Star Trek and media tie-ins fran- 
chise publishing more than 60 titles - including nov- 
els, calendars, encyclopedias, technical manuals and 
making of books. He has published successful tie-ins 
to id Software's Doom and will be publishing novels 
based on 3d Realms' Shadow Warrior and Duke 
Nuke'em, and Epic's Unreal and is in negotiations 
with numerous companies for additional properties. 

MICHAEL SHANTZ 

Michael Shantz worked at Sun Microsystems on 2D 
and 3D graphics, publishing several Siggraph papers 
on NURBS and adaptive forward differencing. He is 
currently at Intel since 6/94 working on efficent 3D 
scene managers, articulated body dynamics, behav- 
iors, and character animation. 



LEE SHELDON 

Trained as a director in theatre and film, Lee Sheldon 
has over 200 produced TV credits from Charlie's 
Angels to Star Trek:The Next Generation. He is in his 
fifth year as a designer, writer, director and producer 
of interactive entertainment filling various roles in 
fives titles including Dark Side of the Moon, Temujin, 
and The Riddle of Master Lu; plus a current mystery 
entertainment website, www.lightfiles.com. 

JAMIE SIGLAR 

Jamie Siglar has been a multimedia consultant and 
freelance multimedia software developer since 1990. 
Her major titles have been educational products 
developed for corporate and institutional clients; 
since 1995 she has been developing prototypes and 
proof-of-concept pieces for game designers and 
developers. In her copious free time she maintains 
the Multimedia Authoring Systems FAQ and writes 
articles about cross-platform multimedia software 
development. 

DANNY SIMON 

With better than twenty years of experience in 
licensing, Danny Simon has been responsible for 
numerous innovations in the licensing industry. He 
has also acquired an expertise in the foreign market 
by virtue of establishing forTox, Lorimar, Carolco, 
and TLG a network of foreign licensing agents in 
most every major market throughout the world. 

JONSNODDY 

Jon Snoddy is currently senior vice president of 
design for Sega GameWorks, charged with leading 
a design team creating the venture's interactive 
entertainment centers and developing a new genre 
of multiplayer games. Jon will collaborate with 
Steven Spielberg, Sega Research and Development 
and MCA's Recreation (Theme Park) Group. 

WARREN SPECTOR 

A veteran computer gaming legend with more than 
14 years of experience in the industry, Warren directs 
the Austin-based office as Ion Storms' fourth lead 
designer. Prior to Ion Storm, Warren was the execu- 
tive producer and general manager of Looking Glass 
Technologies' Austin office where he oversaw the 
development of The Dark Project and Junction Point. 
He was also a producer at Origin Systems for games 
including Cybermage, Crusader: No Remorse, System 
Shock, and several titles in the Ultima series. Warren 
is currently developing Shooter (working title), a 3D 
role-playing espionage game. 

PAOL STEED 

Paul Steed was formerly a mail-order artist who was 
chosen to be the third artist at id Software in 
October of 1996. Prior to id he worked at Virgin 
Interactive Entertainment, Iguana Entertainment and 
Origin. Known for his talent with low-poly models 
and animations as well as kick-ass cinematics, he 
enjoys working going to work every day still geek- 
ing-out over the fact he works at id with the people 
who made Doom a household name. 



PHIL STEINMEYER 

Phil Steinmeyer has been developing games since 
1993. He has programmed and designed/co-designed 
three strategy games: Heroes of Might and Magic 1 
and 2 and Iron Cross. Phil is president of PopTop soft- 
ware, and is currently developing a railroad game for 
1998 release. Phil can design, program, chew gum, 
and hop on one leg all at the same time. 

MIKESTEMMLEE 

Mike Stemmle's history prior to his capture and par- 
tial domestication by the LucasArts Entertainment 
Consortium is something of an enigma, but this is 
merely due to lack of interest. During his consider- 
ably more publicized tenure at LEC, he's managed to 
smear his greasy fingerprints across games like 
Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis, Sam and Max 
Hit the Road, and Afterlife. 

ANDREW STERN 

Andrew Stern has been designing and implementing 
Virtual Computer Petz since 1995 Andrew is the 
behavior engineer and designer with degrees in 
computer engineering and filmmaking from Carnegie 
Mellon and USC. He has spoken at the 1996 Lifelike 
Computer Characters Conference, the 1997 CGDC, 
and the 1 997 AAAI Socially Intelligent Agents sym- 
posium at MIT. 

MARK STEVENS 

Mark C. Stevens is a partner in the corporate and 
intellectual property practice group at the law firm of 
Fenwick & West LLP. 

MATTHEW STIRRE 

Matthew Stibbe is the founder and managing direc- 
tor of Intelligent Games. He has been on both sides 
of the management/ development fence. He 
designed Inperium for EA and programmed 'Nam for 
Domark (now Eidos). Since starting Intelligent 
Games, he has been executive producer on five 
major titles: USS Ticonderoga and Azrael's Tear 
(Mindscape), Simlsle (Maxis), and PGA European 
Tour Golf (EA) and WaterWorld (Interplay). IG is cur- 
rently working on a number of radical titles for 
release in 1998. 

DALE STRANG 

Dale Strang, publisher for Computer Gaming World, 
has been in computer publishing for over 10 years. 
Dale served as associate publisher for PC Games 
magazine as well as a number of other computer 
magazines. 

CHRIS TAYLOR 

An industry veteran, Chris Taylor has created such 
games as Hardball II, 4D Boxing and TriplePlay 
Baseball. Chris recently completed Total Annihilation, 
a game which muscled it's way into a crowded mar- 
ket of real-time strategy games with 3D terrain and 
units. He started out at age 14 on a Radio Shack 
TRS-80 (Model I Level II 16K - for all you old cronies 
out there) and he didn't give up when the challenge 
was to make things look smooth using black and 
white pixels at 128 X 48 screen resolution. 









1 



DAVID TAYLOR 

David Taylor is executive vice president and chief 
operating officer of EuPhonics, Incorporated. 
Previously, David has worked as general manager for 
audio and communications products with S3 
Incorporated and as a marketing manager for Intel 
Corporation. David's a member of the Audio 
Engineering Society and chairs the IA-SIG working 
group for the Downloadable Sounds Standard. 

JOHN TAYLOR 

John Taylor is the senior vice president and co- 
founder of Kesmai Corporation, a developer and dis- 
tributor of massively multiplayer online games in 
Charlottesville, Virginia. With over 1 5 years of engi- 
neering, computer science and management experi- 
ence, John is accomplished in many aspects of the 
online industry. John is on the Advisory Board of the 
Computer Game Developers' Conference. 

STEVE TAYLOR 

Over eight years commercial software development 
experience, Steve's designer credits on seven prod- 
ucts covering Macintosh, PC, UNIX. He programmed 
for these systems and for PlayStation and 
Nintendo64. 

TIMTEMRREULL 

Tim Tembreull is a digital video specialist and pro- 
ducer of live action video for The Journeyman 
Project 3. 

ALBERT TENG 

Albert Teng is a director in Intel's content group. As 
director of arcade market development at Intel 
Corporation, he is responsible for spearheading 
Intel's efforts to make the high-end PC to be the 
platform of choice in the arcade and other emerging 
markets. 

ROBERT TERCEK 

Robert Tercek is responsible for Sony Pictures' cre- 
ative strategy for web-based entertainment. He 
supervises the design and production of all web con- 
tent. His current focus is on creating multiplayer ver- 
sions of the studio's most popular entertainment 
franchises, including Wheel of Fortune, Jeoparday, 
and The Dating Game. Robert brings substantial 
experience as an independent producer of TV and 
interactive programming for leading content 
providers, including Time-Warner, TCI, Microsoft, 
PolyGram and Viacom. His work has been distin- 
guished with many awards, including the SDA 
Strategy Game of the Year and the Envision Award 
for design excellence. Previously, Robert was creative 
director at 7th Level, Inc. 

ALMA TORRES 

Alma Torres has been in curriculum development for 
more than a decade. She possesses a strong back- 
ground in producing educational software for K-12. 
Alma has been part of the design teams for three 
major educational software companies in the coun- 
try, Jostens Learning Corporation, Computer 
Curriculum Corporation, and currently, she is a lead 



content designer at The Lightspan Partnership, Inc. 
Alma has collaborated in the creation of many suc- 
cessful educational products in the area of language 
arts, mathematics and ESL, inlcuding some award- 
winning titles. 

MATTTOSCHLOG 

Before starting his own company, MattToschlog 
spent six years working on 3D simulations including 
Sublogic's Flight Simulator and Jet for the 68000 
machines, and Electronic Arts' Car & Driver for the 
PC. In 1993 Matt co-founded Parallax Software, 
developer of Descent and Descent II. In late 1996 
Parallax spun off Outrage Entertainment, which is 
wholly owned by Matt and is currently developing 
Descent 3 

PIERRE TOUSIGNANT 

Pierre Tousignant can often be found hiding in the 
Softimage training department. This is where he 
does some of his best procrastinating. When forced 
to justify his existence, he gives conferences and 
seminars to tradeshows like CDGC, SIGGRAPH, and 
NAB. 

JEFF TSCHILTSCH 

Jeff Tschiltsch is the Executive Editor of GameWEEK 
magazine, a trade publication for professionals with- 
in the interactive entertainment industry, including 
buyers, distributors, managers, sales people, and the 
development community. Prior to his position with 
GameWEEK, Jeff was a contributor to several con- 
sumer game publications since 1990, was the forum 
leader of America Online's Video Game Systems 
Forum, and has an extensive 15-year background in 
commercial and custom in-house software develop- 
ment in the insurance and financial services sector. 

LARRY TUCH 

Larry Tuch is a screenwriter and interactive designer 
working in the areas of traditional, interactive, and 
location-based entertainment. He has written for the 
NBC television series Columbo and Quincy and 
worked as a freelance designer and scriptwriter for 
Walt Disney Imagineering. His interactive writing 
projects include Where in the World is Carmen 
Sandiego? and Where in the U.S.A. is Carmen 
Sandiego?, The Random House Kids' Encyclopedia, 
and five children's titles for Philips Interactive Media. 

GABRIEL VALENCIA 

Gabriel Valencia is a programmer at Interplay 
Productions. His last title was Star Trek: Starfleet 
Academy, and he's now in the design stages of a 
currently unnamed RPG. His past work includes pro- 
gramming for Stonekeep and writing and designing 
for MUDS. 

SOLANGEVANDERMOER 

Solange Van Der Moer is a senior partner with 
INFINITY Marketing, a full service marketing agency 
based in Sausalito, CA. Solange has 20 years of mar- 
keting experience in the entertainment and comput- 
er industries. Their research and innovative marketing 
techniques have benefited clients such as Kodak, 



MCA, Grolier, PF.Magic and TEN, among others. She 
is a contributor to Electronic Marketing, published by 
John Wiley & Sons, serves on the advisory boards of 
several interactive companies and is a frequent 
speaker at new media conferences. In addition, she 
donates a portion of her time to teaching young girls 
about computers and the Internet which she's been 
happily surfing since 1982. 

MARK VANGE 

Mark Vange, VR- 1 's chief technology officer, joined 
the company in 1995 and is responsible for the net- 
work capabilities of VR-1's multiplayer games as well 
as overseeing all game production. Mark supervises 
the development of VR-1's core technologies, includ- 
ing VR-1 Conductor? technology, a suite of 
client/server, communications and administrative 
applications that minimizes the effects of latency in 
multiplayer Internet gaming and facilitates adminis- 
trative tasks; and the MM3D? engine, whose graphi- 
cal and special effects capabilities rival those of CD- 
ROM-based games. 

JAMIE VANN 

Jamie Vann has been with Jellyvision for a year and a 
half, and is the director/producer of the new net 
show project. He previously worked as a writer for 
That's a Fact Jack. A graduate of the Theatre School 
of DePaul University and an artistic associate with 
Chicago Children's Theater, Jaime has acted and 
directed in Chicago theater for the past 7 years, 
including a one-year stint on the national tour of 
Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story. He is also a member of 
Brainfurnace Productions, a small Chicago filmmak- 
ing company. 

DONVECA 

Don Veca is an audio specialist at Electronic Arts, 
focused on developing EA's interactive music soft- 
ware and composing interactive music for titles such 
as Soviet Strike and Nuclear Strike. 

WILLIAM VOLK 

Bill Volk started in the game biz in 1979 and had his 
first game published in 1980 (Avalon Hill's Conflict 
2500). He came to The Lightspan Partnership on the 
promise of building a 100 CD's worth of educational 
adventures and wound up running the Sony 
PlayStation project, and now has over 60 CD's for 
the Playstation. 

BARRARA WALTER 

Barbara Walter owns Walter & Company, a search 
firm in San Diego, California, that recruits full-time 
staff for the games industry. She has been a recruiter 
since 1988 and is a certified personnel consultant. A 
former journalist, she writes CareerLink, a career 
information resource web page on San Diego 
Magazine Online. 

GORDON WALTON 

Gordon Walton has been authoring games and man- 
aging game development since 1977. He has per- 
sonally developed over two dozen games, primarily 
in the simulation and strategy categories and man- 



I SAME DEVELOPS' CONFERENCE 






aged the development of hundreds of games. He is 
currently general manager of Kesmai Studios, the 
leading developer and distributor of multiplayer 
online games. 

LISA WASHBURN 

Coming from a fine arts background, Lisa Washburn 
has been working as lead RT3D artist at Vector 
Graphics for over a year. Her magically delicious 
models have been featured in Game Developer, past 
CGDCs, and various cool Vector Graphics projects. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

CGDC CLASSES 



DAVE WEIIUSTEIN 

After various and sundry jobs, including learning far 
more about libraries than any non-librarian should 
know, Dave Weinstein entered the industry at White 
Wolf Productions working on Empire II: The Art of 
War. Since then, he's worked on Legends of Kesmai 
at Kesmai Studios, and is now firmly ensconced at 
Red Storm Entertainment doing cool and exciting 
things he can't talk about yet. 

JIM WHIMS 

Jim Whims has both founded and managed many 
high growth companies in Silicon Valley. The most 
notable include Worlds of Wonder, Software 
Toolworks and Sony Computer Entertainment. Jim 
currently serves on the board of directors at 3Dfx 
Interactive, Virtual World Entertainment, THQ, Inc., 
DT Productions, Multitude, Inc., Paraform, Inc. and 
GameFx. 

JOSH WHITE 

Josh White has been producing real-time 3D art for 
games for seven years on over thirty projects. His 

1 996 book about game art, Designing 3D Graphics, 
is being used as a textbook at vocational schools. In 

1997 he managed art production for a multimillion 
dollar game project, Nvidia's Riva 128 demo, and 
other cool projects. Besides game art, he's done 3D 
graphics aplenty: mechanical engineering simula- 
tions, VR environments, prerendered 3D animations, 
and plenty of old-school 2D stuff. He's president of 
Vector Graphics Inc., runs the Computer Game 
Artists association, and he's wicked fast in cleats. 

MARK WILLIAMSON 

Mark Williamson is a freelance 3D Studio MAX 
instructor and consultant who has been teaching the 
ever evolving software since R1 for DOS. He is 
responsible for the design and maintenance of the 



3D Studio KTC program at San Francisco State 
University's multimedia center. He has been one of 
five Kinetix Training Specialists for the last two years 
teaching dealers and in house employees for Kinetix. 
He has trained worldwide, bringing the power of 
MAX to advertising agencies, game producers, archi- 
tects, lawyers, doctors, and corporate clients. He cur- 
rently runs Animatix of Tiburon CA, managing con- 
tract projects and acting as tech support for subcon- 
tractors on those projects. He also runs the San 
Francisco 3D Studio Users Group 
(http://www.sf3dsug.com) as a resource for skills 
enhancement and job location. 

ARIC WILMUNDER 

Aric Wilmunder has been in the entertainment soft- 
ware industry since the start of the personal comput- 
er revolution. During his tenure with the Lucas com- 
panies, Aric was one of the co-developers of Habitat, 
one of the first online worlds, as well as being one of 
the engineers on the SCUMM game development 
system. He has overseen the 'porting' of SCUMM to 
over 12 different platforms, and he was the system 
administrator for such titles as Day of the Tentacle, 
Sam & Max Hit the Road, Full Throttle, and Curse of 
Monkey Island. Aric also manages the 
Internationalization team at LucasArts, where a typi- 
cal title, such as Monkey, has been released in 8 lan- 
guages, including Korean, Chinese, and Portuguese. 
Many lessons have been learned since working on 
his first cross-language products nearly a decade 
ago. These approaches have been used not in just 
the graphic adventure genre, but also in games such 
as Jedi Knight, Dark Forces, Rebel Assault, and 
Afterlife. 

MIKE WILSON 

Mike Wilson is the founder and CEO of Gathering of 
Developers, a new developer-owned game publisher 
that was created late in 1 997 to unite some of the 
best independent development studios in a common 
effort to put the power back in the hands of those 
who actual create the products. Mike was previously 
CEO of Ion Storm, a premier development studio led 
by industry legend John Romero, and before that 
was director of marketing and distribution at id 
Software, the creators of Doom and Quake. 

KEN WIRT 

Ken Wirt is currently vice president of corporate mar- 
keting at Diamond Multimedia Systems, headquar- 
tered in San Jose California. 

STEVE WOODCOCK 

Steven Woodcock gained his background in comput- 
er Al from 1 years of SDI-related work building a 
massive realtime distributed wargame named 
ARGUS. He began working on consumer games in 
1995 when Lockheed-Martin's Real 3D was formed. 
Steve's most recent projects include the Sega arcade 
game Behind Enemy Lines. 



FORREST WORKMAN 

Forrest Workman has three years experience in mul- 
tiplayer game industry and is director of quality 
assurance at Kesmai Corporation. 

PHILIP WRIGHT 

Philip Wright has been business development man- 
ager at Gremlin for the last four years and has been 
instrumental in starting up the OEM division, which 
now has a multi-million pound revenue stream. 






RICHARDS. WRIGHT, JR. 

Richard S. Wright Jr. is a staff applications engineer 
for Real 3D Inc., where he is the lead developer in 
the software products group, and one of two Real 
3D representatives to the OpenGL ARB (non voting 
observers). Lead author of the popular OpenGL 
SuperBible, Richard has been an OpenGL developer 
and advocate for more than three years. Richard's 
most recent OpenGL project is a reference arcade 
game for the Intel 740 (a joint Intel-Real 3D design) 
and an arcade game developers kit for Real 3D and 
Intel hardware. 

DAVID WU 

David Wu is working at his started-up company, 
Pseudo Interactive Inc. His project is a physics inten- , 
sive game named Inertia, which will be published by ' 
MS at some point in time. Please purchase a copy 
when you see it. 

GREGZESCHUK 

Dr. Greg Zeschuk is a medical doctor who has cho- 
sen to lay down his stethoscopes and pursue game | 
development as their primary calling. Since forming 
BioWare Corp. in 1995, he has successfully pitched 
publishers on Shattered Steel and Forgotten Realms: 
Baldur's Gate (both published by Interplay 
Productions). The novelty of his situation is empha- i 
sized by the fact that BioWare is based in the frozen . 
tundra of Canada and at the outset of its creation, 
no one from BioWare had any experience or contacts 
in the game industry. Greg was the producer on 
Shattered Steel. 

EUZUDRIST 

In the interactive entertainment industry, there's an i 
unusually high percentage of people with eclectic 
backgrounds. Ed Zobrist is no exception. After gain- i 
ing an MBA in marketing from Wharton, he spent six 
years in consumer marketing. In 1991 he left his 
position as director of marketing at Mattel Toys to 
co-found ZONO, an independent game design/devel- 
opment company. Zono has worked with EA, Sega, 
Psygnosis and a few other publishers they're too 
embarrassed to admit. 





EXHIBITORS 



3DFX INTERACTIVE 

4435 Fortran Drive 
San Jose, CA 
408-935-4400 
408-262-8874 
www.3dfx.com 

BOOTH 1111 

3Dfx Interactive develops high-performance, cost- 
effective 3D media processors, software and relat- 
ed technology that are designed to enable a highly 
immersive, interactive and realistic 3D experience 
across interactive electronic entertainment plat- 
forms - personal computers, coin-operated arcade 
systems and location-based entertainment. Current 
3Dfx Interactive products include the Voodoo fami- 
ly of accelerator chipsets, Voodoo2, Voodoo 
Graphics and Voodoo Rush. Visit the company on 
the web at http://www.3dfx.com 

3D DESIGN 

Miller Freeman, Inc. 
600 Harrison Street 
San Francisco, CA 94107 
415-905-2200 
415-905-2234 

BOOTH 1143 

3D Design is the hands-on magazine for the cre- 
ation of computer-generated 3D models, render- 
ings and animations. Written for professionals in 
the broadcast, computer graphics, multimedia pre- 
sentation, photorealistic animation, architectural, 
engineering, and electronic entertainment indus- 
tries, 3D Design provides the reader with practical 
tips, techniques, and detailed solutions to common 
and difficult modeling, rendering, and animation 
problems. 

3DLABS, INC. 

181 Metro Drive, Suite 520 
San Jose, CA 951 10 

408-436-3455 
408-436-3458 
info@3dlabs.com 
www.3dlabs.com 

BOOTH 915 

3Dlabs will be demonstrating graphics boards and 
applications powered by their two families of 
processor: GLINT and Permedia. GLINT provides 
workstation-class 3D performance for the PC, ideal 
for game development. Permedia is a low-cost 
graphics processor that integrates fast VGA, video, 
2D and 3D acceleration on a single chip for con- 
sumer, corporate and entry-level professional 



boards, enabling fun and profit on a single graph- 
ics card. 

THE 3D0 COMPANY 

600 Galveston Drive 
Redwood City, CA 94063 
650-261-3000 
650-261-3120 
www.3do.com 

JOB FAIR 409 

The 3DO Company develops, publishes, and distrib- 
utes interactive entertainment software for the PC, 
Internet, Sony PlayStation, and N64. 3DO publishes 
its products worldwide under multiple brand 
names including New World Computing, Cyclone 
Studios, Team .366, and Studio 3DO. Upcoming 
releases include: Might & Magic VI, Army Men, 
High Heat Baseball and Requiem. 

3NAME3D 

13348 Beach Ave. 

Marina del Rey, CA 90292 

310-305-1981 

310-305-8582 

800-933-4621 

www.3name3d.com 

info@ywd.com 

BOOTH 1248 

3NAME3D is the first choice in 3D graphics for 
today's game development needs. 3NAME3D pro- 
vides full-service modeling, texture mapping, 
sculpting and digitizing for all game platforms. 
3NAME3D also offers the CYBERPROPS model 
library of over 2000 models. Also featured is the 
Living Earth, a 1 km/pixel resolution image of the 
Earth. 

ABSOLUTE QUALITY INC. 

10720 Gilroy Road 
Hunt Valley, MD 21031 
410-568-2300 
410-568-2323 
www.aqinc.com 

BOOTH 836 

Absolute Quality Inc. (AQ) is a full-service testing 
and consumer support facility. We employ experi- 
enced quality assurance specialists to provide cus- 
tomers with the highest level of quality testing. AQ 
also provides technical and consumer support, doc- 
umentation and translations services. 



ACADEMY OF INTERACTIVE ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 

10635 Santa Monica Blvd., Suite 180 

Los Angeles, CA 90025 

310-441-2280 

310-441-2285 

academy@interactive.org 

www.interactive.org 

BOOTH 1162 

A non-profit organization based in Los Angeles 
with membership drawn from the interactive enter- 
tainment industry (console, computer, on-line, 
arcade). Applicants must meet minimum profes- 
sional requirements to become voting members. 
Members can take advantage of professional 
development, social programs, insurance, pension, 
and other benefits. The Academy will give its first 
Interactive Achievement Awards at E3. 

ACCELGRAPHICS 

1873 Barber Lane 
Milpitas, CA 95035 

BOOTH 1943 

AccelGraphics makes some of the hottest games- 
development graphics cards on the planet for both 
Intel- and Alpha-based systems. Stop by and see 
how the AccelSTAR II and AccelECLIPSE II can 
speed up your production. We're dying to show you 
the power; see you at booth #1943. 

ACCOLADE 

5300 Stevens Creek Blvd. 
San Jose, CA 951 29 
408-985-1700 

JOB FAIR 416 

Headquartered in San Jose CA , and founded in 
1 984, Accolade, Inc., publishes action, sports and 
strategy games for multimedia personal computers, 
the Internet and next-generation gaming systems 
such as the Sony PlayStation™ game console. 
Leading titles from Accolade include: Hardball®, 
Jack Nicklaus® Golf, Test Drive™, Deadlock™ and 
Star Control™. 



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ACT LABS LTD. 

230-6651 Fraserwood Place 

Richmond, BCV6W 1J3 CANADA 

604-278-3650 

604-278-3612 

hyper@actlab.com 

www.actlab.com 

BOOTH 1659 

Based in the wilderness of Vancouver, Canada, ACT 
Labs Ltd. creates kick-ass peripherals for the world- 
wide market. By combining manufacturing exper- 
tise with hardcore designs, ACT Labs delivers inno- 
vative, easy-to-use game controllers, including 
steering wheels, joysticks, gamepads and light guns 
for PC, PlayStation, N64 and Sega game platforms. 

ALIAS|WAVEFRONT 

210 King Street East 

Toronto, ON M5A 1J7 

800-447-2542 

416-369-6140 

info@aw.sgi.com 

www.aw.sgi.com 

BOOTH 1537 

Alias | Wavefront will be demonstrating tools for 
creating sprites, cinematics, 3D polygonal geome- 
try, textures, and sophisticated animation. 
Highlights include polygon and NURBS modeling 
tools, and access to data through plug-in APIs. 

ALLIANCE SEMICONDUCTOR 

3099 N. First Street 
San Jose, CA 95134 
408-383-4900 
408-383-4999 

BOOTH 1863 

Alliance Semiconductor is a leading supplier of 
high-performance multimedia products for the 
global desktop and portable computer, serving the 
telecommunications and instrumentation markets. 
The company manufactures its products in inde- 
pendent and joint venture wafer fabrication facili- 
ties using advanced CMOS process technologies 
with line widths as narrow as 0.35 microns. 

AMD 

One AMD Place 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 
408-732-2400 
www.amd.com 

BOOTH 1429 

AMD, a global supplier of integrated circuits for 
personal and networked computing and communi- 
cations, is showcasing the AMD-K6® processor 
and the company's Developer Connection program. 
The program offers details about AMD-3D 
Technology - new instructions that enable exciting 



new levels of performance and realism for applica- 
tions optimized for the AMD-K6 3D processor. AMD 
also will highlight the company's Super7™ initia- 
tive to add AGP support and a 1 00-MHz bus to the 
Socket 7 platform. 

ANGEL STUDIOS 

5962 La Place Ct., Suite 100 
Carlsbad, CA 92008 
760-929-0700 
760-929-0719 
www.angel.com 

JOB FAIR 304 

From consoles and PC's, to arcades and LBE, Angel 
Studios is focused on creating fun, unique interac- 
tive entertainment. Currently, we are creating stun- 
ning 3D real-time games for clients such as 
Nintendo, Disney, Microsoft, and Intel. Products 
include MLB featuring Ken Griffey Jr. for the N64 
and several titles in development. 

ANIMATEK INTERNATIONAL, INC. 

77 Geary Street, Suite 300 

San Francisco, CA 94108 

800-471-1233 

415-477-0610 

415-477-0626 

vladimir@animatekusa.com 

tools@animatekusa.com 

www.animatek.com 

BOOTH 1754 

AnimaTek International is a developer of propri- 
etary 3D computer graphics software for the cre- 
ation of real-time characters in realistic environ- 
ments, also providing custom services for anima- 
tion, 3D graphics, games and multimedia products. 
AnimaTek will be showing its award-winning land- 
scape-generation program, AnimaTek's World 
Builder, as well as other cutting-edge technologies. 

ANIMATION MAGAZINE 

30101 Agoura Court, Suite 110 
Agoura Hills, CA 91301-4301 
818-991-2884 
818-991-3773 

BOOTH 2139 

Animation Magazine is the animation industry's 
most authoritative trade publication. Monthly cov- 
erage includes television, feature film, video and 
commercial animation, post-production, multime- 
dia, gaming, computer technologies, schools and 
animation art. Each issue contains sections on digi- 
tal animation, career opportunities, animation mar- 
kets, production developments and the people 
involved in this booming industry. 



ARTBEATS SOFTWARE, INC. 

2511 South Myrtle Road 
Myrtle Creek, OR 97457 
541-883-4429 
541-883-4547 
www.artbeats.com 

BOOTH 834 

Artbeats Software, Inc., located in Oregon, is the 
leading developer dedicated to distributing high- 
quality video clips, 3D rendering products, textures 
and backgrounds. 



ASCENSION TECHNOLOGY CORP. 

PO Box 527 

Burlington, VT 05402 

802-860-6440 

802-860-6439 

ascension@ascension-tech.com 

www.ascension-tech.com 

BOOTH 1156 

Ascension exhibits MotionStar Wireless® - the 
world's only magnetic tracker that is both wireless 
and real-time. See how this award-winning tracker 
captures the natural motions of human performers 
and instantly animates the motions of computer- 
generated characters. MotionStar Wireless elimi- 
nates all those bulky, trailing cables to truly set 
your performers free. 

ATARI GAMES/MIDWAY GAMES 

675 Sycamore Drive 
Milpitas, CA 95035 

408-434-3700 
408-434-5888 
resumes@agames.com 
www.atarigames.com 

JOB FAIR 410 

Stop by our job fair booth at CGDC for opportuni- 
ties in Animation and Programming. Atari Games 
and Midway are leading designers and developers 
of interactive video game products for the arcade 
and for a variety of popular home game and com- 
puter platforms, including Nintendo, Sony and Sega 
and personal computers. 

AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR, INC. 

4245 Technology Dr. 
Fremont, CA 94538 
510-252-4245 
510-770-0132 
www.aureal.com 

BOOTH 1620 

Aureal will be showing their brand-new Vortex II 
PCI audio chip, and the next generation of their 
A3D positional 3D audio technology 





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BANJO SOFTWARE, INC. 

2001 Oakcreek Rd. E335 
River Ridge, LA 70123 
www.banjosoft.com 

JOB FAIR 302 

Currently developing HACX2. Visit booth #302, see 
HACX, HACX2 and our engine in development. 
We're based in New Orleans, LA, so come get 
some Mardi Gras Throws! ! We'll be scouting for 
super talents in all phases of game development. 
Find out how the Banjo way may be just what you 
are looking for!! 



BLIZZARD ENTERTAINMENT 

654 Bair Island Rd„ Suite 200 
Redwood City, CA 94063 
415-366-7559 
415-366-7587 
www.blizzard.com 

JOB FAIR 402 

With development offices in Irvine and Redwood 
City, CA, Blizzard Entertainment is an international- 
ly renowned publisher of entertainment software, 
whose products and services include the number- 
one selling Warcraft series, the blockbuster hit 
Diablo, the world's largest Internet game service 
— Battle.net, and the eagerly anticipated Starcraft. 

C/C++ USER'S JOURNAL 

R&D Publications-Miller Freeman, Inc. 
1601 W. 23rd St. Ste 200 
Lawrence, KS 66046 
913-841-1631 
913-841-2624 

BOOTH 1143 

C/C++ User's Journal provides practical, useful 
information for the professional C and C++ pro- 
grammer. The Journal uses "how-to" articles, tuto- 
rials, product user reports, case studies, and exten- 
sive code listings to explain how developers can 
efficiently build C and C++ programs. Please stop 
by our booth for a free copy of our magazine. 

CAUGARI CORPORATION 

1959 Landing Drive 
Mountain View, CA 94043 
650-390-9600 
650-390-9755 
www.caligari.com 

BOOTH 1548 

Caligari Corporation, creators of the award-win- 
ning trueSpace3, will be showing off why 
trueSpace is the up and coming platform for the 
independent game and plug-in developer, as well 
as announcing a new rendering agreement with 
LightWork Design. Presentations at the booth will 
be given by veteran developers and will show off 



features not available in any other mid-range 3D 
package nor found in many high-end workstations. 

CGDA 

960 North San Antonio Rd„ #1 251 30 
Los Altos, CA 94022 
415-948-2432 
415-948-2744 

BOOTH 1300 

The Computer Game Developers' Association or 
CGDA is a professional association and non-profit 
corporation dedicated to promoting the interactive 
entertainment industry. It exists to serve the 
careers and interests of its members, foster infor- 
mation exchange and communication among pro- 
fessionals in the game development community. 
Members enjoy a number of benefits which include 
insurance, a Credit Union, and special discounts on 
products and services. In addition, all members 
receive a subscription to The CGDA Report (a quar- 
terly newsletter), the CGDA Directory (containing 
listings of thousands of people and companies), 
career assistance and access to a number of net- 
working events throughout the year. To learn more 
about how you can become a part of this cutting- 
edge association, see us at booth # 1300. 

CHROMATIC RESEARCH, INC. 

615Tasman Dr. 
Sunnyvale, CA 94089 
408-752-9100 
info@chromatic.com 
www.chromatic.com 

BOOTH 1721 

Chromatic Research, working with semiconductor 
partners LG Semicon, SGS-THOMSON, and Toshiba, 
has created the Mpact multimedia solution. This 
media processor-based solution supplies unprece- 
dented multimedia processing power for the latest 
generation of power-hungry applications such as 
DVD and Direct3D Games, plus state-of-the-art 
performance and features for 2D/3D graphics, 
audio, video, fax/modem and telephony. 

COMPUTER GRAPHICS WORLD 

TenTara Blvd., 5th Floor 
Nashua, NH 03062 
603-891-9425 
603-891-9492 
www.cgw.com 

BOOTH 2143 

Computer Graphics Worlds focus on the entire 
spectrum of innovation in computer graphics serves 
the vast majority of readers and advertisers because 
the technologies embodied in computer graphics 
hardware and software — for rendering, modeling, 
animation, and simulation — apply to the full range 
of applications, from engineering to entertainment. 



CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 

26071 Merit Circle, Suite 108 

Laguna Hills, CA 92653 

714-582-1946 

800-722-7748 

714-582-3706 

sales@ceti.com 

www.ceti.com 

BOOTH 1760 

We will be presenting: ProStudio, ProStation 3D, 
and ProRAID. ProStudio - Our studio editing solu- 
tion, it is designed as an all-in-one content creation 
& media management application, offering inte- 
grated video and audio editing, special effects, 
compositing, titling, and project management tools 
for the NT platform. 

ProStation 3D - Our NT graphics workstation 
with OpenGL engine. ProRAID - Our storage solu- 
tion, is the fastest, most expandable, disk array sys- 
tem with an aggregate transfer rate of 40MB per 
second w/ Ultra SCSI interfaces. Data capacities 
range from 27GB to 2.7TB. 

DR. DOBB'S JOURNAL 

Miller Freeman, Inc. 
411 Borel Avenue 
San Mateo CA 94402 
415-358-9500 

BOOTH 1143 

Software professionals turn to Dr. Dobb's Journal 
for comprehensive technical information on issues 
affecting their jobs, their companies and their pas- 
sion for the craft of development. DDJ covers solu- 
tions, tools, and techniques and delivers more code 
examples than any other magazine. Please stop by 
our booth for a complimentary copy of Dr. Dobb's 
Journal. 

DIAMOND MULTIMEDIA 

2880 Junction Avenue 
San Jose, CA 95134 

BOOTH 1513 

Visit Diamond Multimedia Systems at booth #1513 
to see the latest in PC gaming hardware. Products 
available for demonstration include the Monster 
3D II graphics accelerator, the Monster Sound 
MX200 3D sound accelerator, the recently 
announced Stealth II G460 graphics accelerator 
powered by the Intel I740 chipset and the 
Diamond DVD MC20, an integrated 2D/3D/DVD 
upgrade solution. 



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DOLBY LABORATORIES 
LICENSING CORPORATION 

100 Potrero Avenue 

San Francisco, CA 94103 

415-558-0200 

415-863-1373 

info@dolby.com 

dolby.com 

BOOTH 1921 

Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation will con- 
duct demonstrations in authoring with Dolby 
Surround. With well over 1 00 game titles shipped 
worldwide, Dolby Surround is the standard for true 
interactive multichannel audio. Dolby Digital, the 
standard for DVD content worldwide, will also be 
shown. Experience these new exciting technologies 
for gaming today. 

DWANGO/INTERACTIVE VISUAL 
SYSTEMS CORP. 

9432 Old Katy Road 
Suite 333 

Houston, TX 77055 
713 467 8865 
713467 5513 
www.dwango.com 

BOOTH 2029 

DWANGO is the only on-line game service dedicat- 
ed to real-time, multiplayer game play. It supports 
new and classic multiplayer action, real-time strate- 
gy, driving simulation and sports games. DWANGO 
is available through DWANGO World and DWAN- 
GO Zone on Microsoft's Internet Gaming Zone. 

ELSAINC. 

2231 Calle De Luna 
Santa Clara, CA 95054 
408-919-9100 
408-919-9120 

BOOTH 1343 

ELSA Inc., the leading manufacturer of worksta- 
tion-class graphics accelerators for animation and 
visualization, is demonstrating its family of GLoria 
products for 3D acceleration. With customized dri- 
vers and utilities for Windows NT, Windows 95 and 
OpenGL, ELSA delivers the ultimate graphics expe- 
rience for animators using 3D Studio MAX, 
Lightscape, Lightwave, Softimage and more. 



ENGAGE GAMES ONLINE 

17922 Fitch Avenue 

Irvine, CA 92614 

714-752-5510 

714-752-5516 

info@gamesonline.com 

www.gamesonline.com 

BOOTH 1129 

ENGAGE Games Online provides the world's most 
popular multiplayer games worldwide through its 
partners GameStorm, Pacific Internet, GamesZone 
and America Online. ENGAGE'S relationships with 
the industry's top game companies such as Blizzard 
Entertainment, Interplay Productions, Mythic 
Entertainmnet, and Monolith Productions (to name 
a few), assures online gamers around the world a 
constant stream of the best content available any- 
where online. 

ESS TECHNOLOGY, INC. 

48401 Fremont Blvd. 
Fremont, CA 94538 
510-492-1088 
www.esstech.com 

BOOTH 1348 

ESS Technology, Inc. is a leading supplier of PC 
audio, digital video and communications semicon- 
ductor solutions for the PC and consumer markets. 
ESS designs, develops, and markets highly integrat- 
ed mixed signal semiconductor and software solu- 
tions for multimedia applications. ESS solutions 
integrate positional 3D based on CRL's Sensaura™ 
technology. 

GAME DEVELOPER 

Miller Freeman, Inc. 
600 Harrison Street 
San Francisco, C A 94107 
415-905-2200 
415-905-2232 

BOOTH 1143 

Game Developer is the only magazine providing 
information exclusively for game creators, not play- 
ers. The editorial covers the commerce, code and 
creativity of developing PC, console and arcade 
games. Please stop by our booth for a complimen- 
tary copy of Game Developer. 

GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON 
TECHNOLOGY GROUP 

2855 Campus Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94403 
650-572-2700 
650-572-9675 
www.gravis.com 

BOOTH 1648 



Gravis is a leading manufacturer of game con- 
trollers. Gravis makes top-quality game pads and 
joysticks that give game players the edge to fully 
experience the game. Gravis is excited to announce 
its newest digital game pad, Xterminator, the most 
powerful game controller on the planet. Get the 
Gravis edge! 

GT INTERACTIVE SOFTWARE 

417 Fifth Avenue 
New York, NY 10016 
212-726-6500 
212-679-3424 
www.gtinteractive.com 

JOB FAIR 300 

Headquartered in NY, GT Interactive Software Corp. 
is a leading global publisher and developer of 
entertainment and edutainment software under the 
GT Interactive, Cavedog Entertainment, SingleTrac, 
Humongous and MacSoft brands for personal com- 
puter as well as video game systems from Sony, 
Nintendo and Sega. GT Interactive is a leader in 
value-priced software under the WizardWorks, 
CompuWorks and Slash brands. 

HAPP CONTROLS 

106 Garlisch Drive 

Elk Grove, IL 60007 

847-593-6130 

1-800-BUY-HAPP 

847-593-6137 

info@happcontrols.com 

www.happcontrols.com 

BOOTH 1349 

Happ Controls will exhibit the Control Interface 
Board which allows any Happ Controls Controller 
to interface with a PC. Also on display will be Force 
Feedback Joystick Technology, licensed from 
Immersion Corporation. We are also a leading 
manufacturer and distributor of joysticks, pushbut- 
tons, optic guns, trackballs, driving controls, coin 
acceptors, power supplies, switches, meters, light- 
ing and cleaning products. 

HOUSE OF MOVES MOTION 
CAPTURE STUDIOS 

71 1 Hampton Dr. 
Venice, CA 90291 
310-399-2485 
310-399-9115 
www.moves.com 

BOOTH 1255 

hOuse of mOves is the industry leader in 3D 
motion capture services. Satisfied clients include 
Microsoft, Electronic Arts, Activision, Accolade, 
Engineering Animation Inc. (EAI), Digital Domain, 
and many more. HOM boasts a full team of 3D ani- 
mation professionals who can help you get the 








most out of the mocap for your next project. hOuse 
of mOves utilizes the Vicon 370e optical motion 
capture system, meaning that we can capture a vir- 
tually unlimited number of markers for unprece- 
dented realism. We specialize in customizing the 
final data to meet the needs of your specific project 
and helping integrate the data in a number of pop- 
ular 3D packages. 

IMMERSION CORPORATION 

2158 Paragon Drive 

San Jose, CA 95131 

408-467-1900 

408-467-1901 

info@immerse.com 

www.immerse.com 

www.force-feedback.com 

BOOTH 1137 

l-FORCE from Immersion Corporation is the tech- 
nology standard for force feedback computer 
peripherals. I-FORCE is currently licensed by most 
major makers of joysticks and wheels. 

INFORMATION PACKAGING 
CORPORATION 

1670N.WayneportRd. 
Macedon, NY 14502 
800-776-7633 
315-986-4585 
mikeh@infopkg.com 

BOOTH 1853 

Information Packaging Corporation designs, manu- 
factures and markets a wide array of envelope-style 
products for the packaging of compact discs and 
other computer media. Our products are made 
from a variety of materials and are designed to sat- 
isfy an expanding number of application require- 
ments for single or multiple discs. 

INSTALLSHIELD SOFTWARE 
CORPORATION 

900 National Parkway, Suite 125 
Schaumburg, IL60173 

800-374-4353 
847-240-9120 
lnfo@installshield.com 
www.installshield.com 

BOOTH 1941 

InstallShield 5.1 Professional is the commercial 
Windows developer's choice for creating industry- 
standard application installations. Its integrated 
development environment offers both scripting 
power and time-saving visual tools. Drag-and-drop 
file movement and a new Media Build Wizard 
allow lightning-fast creation of multiple builds to 
support various platforms, languages, and media 
types. 



INTEL CORPORATION 

2200 Mission College Blvd. 
Santa Clara, CA 95052 

BOOTH 1637 

Intel will showcase the mainstream PC gaming 
platform for Christmas '98, and give a glimpse of 
what's to come in '99. Capabilities such as the 
Intel740 AGP graphics, online tournament play and 
USB game peripherals will be shown. Intel will 
break new ground with demonstrations of first 
generation PC-based arcade products. A suite of 
next generation design tools will help developers 
make the most of the platform performance. 

INTERACT ACCESSORIES, INC. 

9611 Pulaski Park Drive, Suite 309 

Baltimore, MD 21220 

410-238-2424 

410-238-1427 

www.interact-acc.com 

www.gameshark.com 

BOOTH 1249 

InterAct is the largest manufacturer & supplier of 
gaming peripherals & accessories, including con- 
trollers, joysticks, memory cards, speakers, cables, 
AC's, RF's, battery packs, Game Boy® accessories 
and other unique items. Our 'Powered Partners' 
evangelism program reaches out to the develop- 
ment community for compatibility assurance, beta 
testing, and cross-promotional opportunities. 

INTERACTIVITY 

Miller Freeman, Inc. 

411 Borel Avenue, Suite 100 

San Mateo, CA 944020 

415-358-9500 

415-358-9855 

BOOTH 1143 

Inter Activity \i the how-to magazine for profession- 
al and aspiring multimedia developers and enthusi- 
asts. Each issue is packed with step-by-step infor- 
mation, case studies of cutting-edge products, 
instructional columns, news, and new gear reports. 
Please stop by our booth for a complimentary copy 
of InterActivity. 

INTERGRAPH 
COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

289 Dunlop Blvd. 
Huntsville, AL 35824 
205-730-2000 
205-730-8300 
www.intergraph.com/ics 

BOOTH 1913 

Intergraph Computer Systems offers the most 
advanced NT game development platforms as well 



as leading-edge consumer-PC game accelerators. 
This level of industry involvement illustrates 
Intergraph Computer Systems' total commitment to 
promoting technologies to make game develop- 
ment faster, easier and more cost-effective and 
game play more realistic and fun. 

JON PEDDIE ASSOCIATES 

4 Saint Gabrielle Court 
Tiburon, CA 94920 
www.jpa.com 

BOOTH 1260 

JPA is a leading publisher and market research firm 
for information and analysis on digital media tech- 
nology. Headquartered in Tiburon, California, JPA 
has been monitoring the PC graphics industry for 
over 1 1 years. The Peddie Report, JPA's weekly 
newsletter, tracks semiconductors, add-in boards, 
APIs, software applications - entertainment and 
commercial, software tools, and investments made 
in the industry on a weekly basis. In addition, the 
company monitors the growing digital media 
industry, providing in-depth analysis with market 
reports and white papers. 

KESMAI CORPORATION 

230 Court Square 
Charlottesville, VA 22902 
804-963-8500 
804-963-8828 
www.gamestorm.com 

BOOTH 1129 

Kesmai will be demonstrating GameStorm, its pre- 
mier online gaming nirvana. Products featured will 
be Air Warrior III, Aliens Online, Jack Nicklaus 
Online Golf Tour and Starship Troopers: 
BattleSpace. Included in the GameStorm presenta- 
tion will be demonstrations of Magestorm, 
Darkness Falls, and Virtual Pool, highlighting the 
integration of Engage Games Online's content into 
the GameStorm service. 

KINETIX, INC., 

A DIVISION OF AUTODESK 

642 Harrison Street 
San Francisco, CA 94107 
415-507-6504 
415-507-6116 
www.ktx.com 

BOOTH 1813 

3D Studio MAX and Character Studio comprise a 
powerful solution for 3D video game content cre- 
ation. Kinetix will be demonstrating how the latest 
releases of these industry-leading products contin- 
ue to revolutionize the game authoring process, 
from model creation to character animation and 
motion capture integration. 



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LIGHTSCAPE TECHNOLOGIES 

1054 S. DeAnza Boulevard 

San Jose, CA 95129 

408-342-1900 

408-342-1910 

info@lightscape.com 

www.lightscape.com 

BOOTH 1762 

Lightscape 3, a next-generation visualization and 
lighting tool for Windows 95/NT, accurately simu- 
lates the behavior and physical properties of lights 
and materials, delivering 3D scenes of unsurpassed 
realism and real-time interactivity. Lightscape is 
compatible with a wide range of 3D modeling and 
animation packages. 

LOGITECH 

6505 Kaiser Drive 
Fremont, CA 94555-3615 
510-795-8500 
510-713-5091 
www.logitech.com 

BOOTH 1837 

Get your hands on Logitech's NEW Digital 
Weapon-WingMan® Force-a new dimension in 
force feedback scheduled to debut at E3! Compete 
at our in-booth tournament and win prizes! 
Award-winning WingMan® Extreme Digital will 
also be in action at CGDC - use our "flight plan" to 
find it and receive a gift! 

MAD CATZ 

430 Raleigh Avenue 
El Cajon, CA 92020 

BOOTH 1263 

Mad Catz is the industry leader for video game 
peripherals and accessories. In 1998 we continue 
to produce quality innovative controllers like the 
Panther XL and Andretti Racing Wheel. Team Mad 
Catz will go to any length to provide gamers with 
the control they demand. Mad Catz. By Any Means 
Necessary... 

METROWERKS 

Dept 334, P.O. Box 9700 

Austin, TX 78758 

512-873-4700 

512-873-4900 

info@metrowerks.com 

www.metrowerks.com 

BOOTH 1448 

Metrowerks develops, markets, and supports the 
CodeWarrior family of software development tools. 
The intuitive CodeWarrior Integrated Development 
Environment (IDE), including our cutting-edge com- 
piler and debugger technology, sophisticated pro- 
ject manager, source-code editor, and multi-lan- 



guage code browser, provides a powerful solution 
for developing games for PlayStation, Windows 
95/NT, and Mac OS. 

MICROPROSE 

2490 Mariner Square Loop 
Alameda, CA 94501 
www.microprose.com 
www.gathering.net 

JOB FAIR 407 

MicroProse is a leading developer and publisher of 
interactive entertainment software for use on CD- 
ROM-based personal computers. The company has 
five development studios located in: Alameda, 
California; Hunt Valley, Maryland; Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina; Austin, Texas and Chipping 
Sodbury, England. 

MICROSOFT CORPORATION 

One Microsoft Way 
Redmond, WA 98052 

BOOTH 1317 

Get those great ideas out of your head and into 
your PC with Microsoft DirectX! Don't miss DirectX 
technology in action; visit the demo stations, talk 
to the developers, and experience it all hands-on in 
our partner pavilion showcasing some of the best 
in games, tools and hardware. Stop by and learn 
more about how Microsoft DirectX can breathe life 
into your PC game. 

MICROSOFT SYSTEMS JOURNAL 

411 Borel Avenue 
San Mateo CA 94402 
415-358-9500 
415-358-9966 

BOOTH 1143 

Microsoft Systems Journal is the premier magazine 
for professional developers who have standardized 
on Microsoft environments. It provides in-depth 
product analysis and advice to professional pro- 
grammers. The focus of MSJ is to provide tools and 
techniques for programmer developing for 
Microsoft Windows. Please stop our booth for a 
complimentary copy and a discounted subscription. 

MIDWAY HOME 
ENTERTAINMENT, INC. 

101 10 Mesa Rim Road 
San Diego, CA 92121 
619-658-9500 
619-658-9557 
www.midwaygames.com 

JOB FAIR 410 

Stop by our job fair booth at CGDC for opportuni- 
ties in animation and programming. Atari Games 



and Midway are leading designers and developers 
of interactive video game products for the arcade 
and for a variety of popular home game and com- ' 
puter platforms, including Nintendo, Sony and Sega 
and personal computers. 

MILLER FREEMAN, INC. 

600 Harrison Street 
San Francisco, CA 94107 
415-905-2200 
415-905-2232 

BOOTH 1143 

Miller Freeman, Inc. opens high tech markets. Our 
expanding reach includes such publications at this ' 
show as 3D Design, C/C++ Users Journal, Dr. 
Dobbs Journal, Game Developer, InterActivity, 
Microsoft Systems Journal, Multimedia Systems 
Design, and Windows Developers Journal. All focus 
on articles covering the latest technologies and 
practical applications. Visit our booth for discount- 
ed subscriptions and complimentary issues. 

MINOLTA CORPORATION 

101 Williams Drive 

Ramsey NJ 07446 

1-888-ISD-COLOR 

201-818-3517 

201-934-4642 

cnoble@minolta.com 

www.Minolta3d.com 

BOOTH 830 

Minolta introduces a new concept in non-contact 
3D scanners, the VIVID 700. Using an 8-step zoom 
lens and a laser light source, this high-speed (.6 of 
a second), portable, color digitizing system converts 
objects into 3D coordinate data. Ideal for such 
applications as computer graphics, animation and 
3D games. 

MOTION ANALYSIS CORPORATION 

3617 Westwind Blvd. 

Santa Rosa, CA 95403 

707-579-6500 

707-526-0629 

info@motionanalysis.com 

www.motionanalysis.com 

BOOTH 1161 

Motion Analysis Corporation is the world's largest 
manufacturer of optical motion capture systems. 
Full-body motion capture systems feature our pro- 
prietary camera, the FALCON, with switchable 
frames per second with double resolution at 60 or 
1 20fps or high speed at 1 80 or 240fps. high res 
software includes: SEGRO, MoCap Solver and 
Director Sequencer. 








THE MOTION FACTORY 

39300 Civic Center Drive, Suite 240 

Fremont, CA 94538 

510-505-5151 

510-505-5150 

info@motion-factory.com 

www.motion-factory.com 

BOOTH 1621 

The Motivate™ Intelligent Digital Actor™ System 
is a complete, real-time authoring solution for 3D 
games and interactive content. Using Real-Time 
Motion Synthesis, realistic 3D motion is generated 
on the fly in a dynamic environment, while charac- 
ter logic is created with event-based behavior 
programming. 

MULTIGEN INC. 

550 South Winchester Blvd., Suite 500 

San Jose, CA 95128 

408-261-4100 

408-261-4103 

sales@multigen.com 

www.multigen.com 

BOOTH 1337 

MultiGen Creator™ is the first complete interactive 
realtime 3D solution for Windows NT™. This hierar- 
chical, WYSIWYG modeling system frees game 
artists to create in the context of the target platform 
environment. Other formats can be imported, opti- 
mized for realtime, and exported. MultiGen Creator 
is readily customized to meet specific needs. 

NEWTEK 

8200 IH-10 West, Suite 900 

San Antonio, TX 78230 
210-370-8000 
210-370-8001 
www.newtek.com 

BOOTH 1929 

NewTek is the leader in providing full-featured 
video editing and special effects tools that allow 
anyone to produce professional video and graphics. 
The company's products include Video Toaster/Flyer, 
Calibar, Lightwave 3D, Inspire 3D and Aura and are 
used worldwide on projects from home video to 
feature film. 

NICHIMEN GRAPHICS INC. 

12555 West Jefferson Blvd., Suite 285 

Los Angeles, CA 90066 

310-577-0500 

310-577-0577 

sales@nichimen.com 

www.nichimen.com 

BOOTH 1543 

See N-World 3.2 Digital Content Creation software 
(NT & SGI): Real-time 3D graphics, animation, the 



world's best polygonal modeler, 2D/3D paint, mate- 
rials editor, the most advanced non-linear motion 
editor for multiple skeletons (even MoCap data), 
photorealistic renderer, complete data export. Used 
for Sony PlayStation, Sega Saturn, Nintendo 64, 
PC, the Web.. .A game developer's dream come 
true! 

NVIDIA CORPORATION 

1226 Tiros Way 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 
408-617-4000 
www.nvidia.com 

BOOTH 1229 

NVIDIA™ designs, develops and markets award- 
winning 128-bit 3D graphics processors that pro- 
vide high-performance 3D graphics for personal 
computers. NVIDIA will be demonstrating its new 
RIVA TNT™, the first integrated single-pass multi- 
texturing processor that delivers a mind-blowing 
200 million pixels per second, allowing developers 
to create games with stunning visual effects and 
realism. 

PEAK PERFORMANCE 
TECHNOLOGIES 

7388 S. Revere Pkwy. Ste. 603 
Englewood, CO 801 12 
303-799-8686 
303-799-8690 
peakinfo@peakperform.com 

BOOTH 1253 

Peak Motus lets you create animated characters 
with revolutionary realism using human or animal 
movements videotaped directly from real life. 
Unlike existing systems, Peak Motus breaks the 
barrier of controlled studio space with fully inte- 
grated optical real-time and video capabilities to 
capture motion indoors, outdoors, underwater and 
more. 

POLHEMUS, INC. 

One Hercules Drive 
PO Box 560 
Colchester, VT 05446 
800-357-4777 
802-655-3159 
802-655-1439 
www.polhemus.com 
sales@polhemus.com 

BOOTH 1443 

Polhemus develops, manufactures, and markets 
six-degree-of-freedom measurement systems that 
measure the exact position (X, Y, and Z coordi- 
nates) and orientation (azimuth, elevation & roll) 
of a small magnetic sensor in three-dimensional 
space. System applications include Animation - 
motion capture of live performers for animating 



computer-generated characters used in game 
development, film, broadcast, and virtual charac- 
ters in virtual sets, and Computer Games - hand- 
held joysticks, data gloves, and head-mounted 
displays. 

POWER VR/ NEC ELECTRONICS 

2880 Scott Boulevard 

P.O. Box 58062 

Santa Clara, CA 95052-8062 

408-588-5883 

www.powervr.com 

BOOTH 1503 

PowerVR, from NEC Electronics and VideoLogic, is 
a high-performance 3D graphics accelerator for 
PCs, consoles, set-top boxes and arcade systems. 
Using revolutionary 3D architecture, PowerVR 
brings images to life with realistically rendered 
characters and scenery. PowerVR's technology 
enables fast, smooth and vivid graphics, enraptur- 
ing players with the ultimate visual experience. 

QUANTUM 3D, INC. 

2520 Mission College Blvd. Suite 202 Santa Clara, 

CA 95054 

408-919-9999 

408-919-9980 

info@quantum3d.com 

www.quantum3d.com 

BOOTH 1702 

Quantum3D, Inc. develops and markets price/per- 
formance solutions for the advanced visual com- 
puting marketplace. We're focused on delivering 
"Affordable Reality" solutions, including integrated 
PC-based visualization systems, realtime 3D graph- 
ics accelerators for PC-based coin-op/LBE, visual 
simulation, training, and digital content creation. 

QSOUND LABS, INC. 

2748 37th Avenue N.E. 

Calgary, Alberta T1Y 5L3 

403-291-2492 

403-250-1521 

sales@qsound.com 

www.qsound.com 

BOOTH 814 

QSound Labs, Inc., the leader in quality 3D audio, 
introduces QMDX™, a free, high-level, feature-rich 
sound system for Windows® PCs. Game program- 
mers will find QMDX saves work and solves 3D 
audio problems while fully supporting Direct 
Sound/DS3D accelerators. Also featured will be the 
ThunderBird 128™, a high performance PCA audio 
accelerator jointly developed by QSound Labs and 
VLSI Technology. See VLSI's listing for complete 
details. 



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RAD GAME TOOLS 

850 S. Main Street 
Salt Lake City, UT 84101 
801-322-4300 
801-359-6169 

BOOTH 1437 

RAD Game Tools will be showcasing the latest ver- 
sions of Smacker and the Miles Sound System. RAD 
will also be previewing its next generation, MPEG- 
class codec, "Bink", as well as version 4.1 of the 
Miles Sound System with 3D and MPEG-3 audio 
decompression support. 

RAINDROP GEOMAGIC, INC. 

206 N. Randolph St. 

Suite 520 

Champaign, IL 61820-3989 

217-239-2551 

217-239-2556 

sales@geomagic.com 

www.geomagic.com 

BOOTH 1153 

Geomagic Wrap™ is a software for automatic sur- 
face and solid model reconstruction from arbitrary 
point cloud data. Wrap can be bundled with scan- 
ning hardware or used as a front end for CAD and 
graphics software packages. A free evaluation copy 
of geomagic Wrap™ can be downloaded from 
www.geomagic.com. 

REAL 3D 

12506 Lake Underhill Rd. MP-81 1 

Orlando, FL 32825 

800-393-7730 

407-306-3358 

real3d@real3d.com 

www.real3d.com 

BOOTH 1821 

Real 3D will demonstrate its new family of 
3D/2D/video graphics boards called the StarFighter. 
The StarFighter is powered by the new Intel740 
graphics accelerator, which Real 3D co-developed 
with Intel. The StarFighter offers the industry's best 
combination of performance and image quality in a 
mainstream graphics board. 

REALIMATION INC 

2880 Zanker Road., Ste. 203 
San Jose, CA 95134 
408-432 7221 
408-432 7235 
sales@realimation.com 
www.realimation.com 

BOOTH 1243 

Visit the booth and witness some compelling 3D 
games developed using RealiMation! Platform and 
renderer independent, RealiMation is a powerful 



API for rapid prototyping and development of com- 
pelling interactive 3D games. Take full game 
authoring from scenario / storyboard to simultane- 
ous delivery on accelerated hardware, whether 
standalone or multi-screen networked LBE 
platforms. 

REALITY FUSION, INC. 

503 Van Ness Avenue 

Santa Cruz, CA 95060 

408-420-0520 

408-420-0523 

corpinfo@realityfusion.com 

www.realityfusion.com 

BOOTH 1657 

Reality Fusion breaks the barrier between a human 
being and a computer by providing technology and 
products that enable users to control the computer 
without a keyboard, joystick, mouse or microphone. 
Using Reality Fusion's FreeAction™ Technology 
and a video camera, you can bounce a ball with 
your hands, battle an opponent with your arms and 
legs, and more. 

REMINFOGRAFICAS.A. 

Plaza Santa Barbara, n°1 0-2 
Madrid 28004, Spain 
34-1-319 41 55 phone 
34-1-319 41 74 fax 
info@infografica.com 
www.infografica.com 

BOOTH 2042 

REM Infografica has all the tools and objects you 
need to build your parallel world in 3D, from our 
revolutionary Reyes Plug-ins to the world's fastest- 
growing 3D Model Bank. Check out our award- 
winning MetaReyes modeler, unique fabric simula- 
tor, weathering tool, cartoon render and huge col- 
lection of photo-realistic models (including 
humans). 

RENDITION, INC. 

999 E.Arques Avenue 

Sunnyvale, CA 94086 

408-822-0100 

408-822-0199 

info@rendition.com 

www.rendition.com 

BOOTH 1629 

Rendition, Inc. provides high-performance, cost- 
effective, multi-functional graphics accelerators for 
the high-volume personal computer market. 
Rendition's V2000 family of award-winning graph- 
ics accelerators enhance add-in card products from 
manufacturers like Diamond Multimedia (Stealth 
II™), Jazz Multimedia (Outlaw 3D™), and 
Hercules Technologies (Thriller 3D™). 



SAITEK INDUSTRIES LTD. 

2295 Jefferson St. 

Torrance, CA 90501 

310-212-5412 

310-212-0866 

info@saitekusa.com 

www.saitekusa.com 

BOOTH 1861 

Saitek Industries, a leading manufacturer of intelli- 
gent games, successfully launched a line of innova- 
tive and award-winning game controllers last year. 
The X36 Ultimate Flight Controller and PC Dash 
graphic command pad have changed the way 
games are played. This year, Saitek will be revealing 
more high-performance game peripherals. 

SCITECH SOFTWARE, INC. 

505 Wall Street 
Chico, CA 95928 
530-894-8400 
530-894-9069 
info@scitechsoft.com 

BOOTH 2141 

SciTech Software is the leading supplier of PC 
graphics utilities, drivers and tools for higher-perfor- 
mance graphics applications. SciTech Display Doctor 
helps PC users fix graphics hardware problems and 
attain maximum performance from software appli- 
cations. SciTech MGL allows game developers to 
access the full performance of graphics hardware. 

SCIENTIFIC PLACEMENT, INC. 

P.O.Box 19949 

Houston, Texas 77224-9949 

281-496-6100 

281-496-0373 

jec@scientific.com 

www.scientific.com 

BOOTH 1855 

Scientific Placement is a technical search firm spe- 
cializing in the commercial software industry. We 
track developer jobs on a national basis and have 
openings for experienced Software Engineers with 
a background in games and graphics development. 
Please see our website at www.scientific.com or 
email jec@scientific.com for more details. 



SEGASOFT NETWORKS, INC. 

150 Shoreline Drive 

Redwood City, CA 94065 

650-654-3400 

650-654-2592 

segasoft.com 

www.heat.net 

BOOTH 2129 

SegaSoft is a privately held company whose share- 
holders include CSK and Sega Enterprises. Founded 





in 1995, SegaSoft develops and publishes content 
and technology for PC CD-ROM and Internet 
games. Headquarted in Redwood City, CA. where it 
employs 120, SegaSoft operates HEAT.NET, the 
leading Internet Game Network for computer gam- 
ing enthusiasts at http://www.heat.net. 

SIERRA ON-LINE 

3380 146th PI. SE, #300 
Bellevue.WA 98007 
425-649-9800 
425-641-7617 
recruit@sierra.com 

JOB FAIR 400 

Sierra is the world's largest designer of multimedia 
entertainment and home productivity software. If 
you're ready to be challenged, we're currently 
doing cutting-edge development with networked 
applications, flight and racing sims, Al, and real- 
time 3D. Join our team and discover how good we 
really are! 

SILICON GAMING, INC. 

2800 West Bayshore Road 
Palo Alto, CA 94303 
650-842-9000 
650-842-9001 
www.silicongaming.com 

JOB FAIR 401 

Silicon Gaming makes a state-of-the-art wagering 
device called Odyssey, the perfect combination of 
Silicon Valley technology and Hollywood produc- 
tion values. We have assembled a remarkable pool 
of entertainment, gaming, and technology talent, 
and are looking for new talent to join our team. 
Silicon Gaming is currently recruiting for entertain- 
ment software engineers. 

SOFTIMAGE 

3510 Blvd. St.-Laurent, Ste. 400 

Montreal, Quebec Canada H2X 2V2 

1-800-576-3846x8871 

softimage.com/cgdc 

BOOTHS 1317 AND 1913 

Check out why the top games like Virtua Fighter III, 
Super Mario64 and Riven are being developed with 
SOFTIMAGE|3D. Come see our product demonstra- 
tions in the Microsoft (#131 7) and Intergraph 
(#1913) booths. We're holding a two-day advanced 
game creation tutorial on Monday, May 4th and 
Tuesday, May 5th. Check out our seminars 
Wednesday, May 6th and Thursday, May 7th 
10:00AM-12:00PM and 2:00PM-4:00PM - 
Tantrum Entertainment will discuss how SOFTIM- 
AGE|3D was used in the creation of their latest 
game. Don't miss our Pool Party -Wednesday, May 
6th at the Long Beach Hyatt. And if you're wonder- 
ing who's blasting the conference with the awe- 



some video wall in the lobby of the LBCC - it's 
SOFTIMAGE! 

SONY INTERACTIVE STUDIOS 
AMERICA, INC. 

989 Hillsdale Boulevard, 4th Floor 
Foster City, CA 94404 
650-655-8000 
650-655-8024 
www.sonyinteractive.com 

BOOTH 929 

Sony Interactive Studios America (SISA) develops 
and publishes software for PC and online markets 
and will feature three new PC titles to release in 
this year: Cyberstrike II™, NFL Gameday™ '99, 
and Everquest™. 

SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE 
DEVELOPMENT CENTER/ 
SONY PICTURES IMAGEWORKS 

9050 West Washington Boulevard 
Culver City, CA 90232-2518 
internetinfo@spimageworks.com 
www.community-place.com 

BOOTH 2135 

Sony Platform Software Development Center (Sony 
PSDC), based in Tokyo, develops next-generation 
networking and communications software. Their 
Community Place suite of VRML applications 
includes innovative client, server, and authoring 
tool solutions. Sony Pictures Imageworks collabo- 
rates with PSDC to create online entertainment 
that showcases the power of Community Place 
products. 

SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 

105 West Beaver Creek Rd. 
Richmond Hill, ON. L4B 1C6, Canada 
905-886-5000 
905-886-6800 

BOOTH 1939 

Sound Ideas produces Sound Effects and 
Production Music on compact disc for Theatre, 
Broadcast, Motion Picture and Multimedia indus- 
tries. Sound Ideas will feature three new additions. 
Image Ideas offers top-quality, high resolution, roy- 
alty-free digital image collections on CD ROM. 
Recommended for use in graphic design, promo- 
tional copy, multimedia applications and desktop 
publishing. 



SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 

7080 Hollywood Blvd. Suite 1100 
Hollywood, CA 90028 
213-603-5100 
213-603-5101 
www.soundelux.com 

BOOTH 1849 

Soundelux Media Labs specializes in sound design 
and music production for multimedia. From devel- 
opment to code release, we can handle all genres 
of music composition/production, asset manage- 
ment and complete sound design, dialogue record- 
ing and mixing. We balance creativity and techno- 
logical expertise (and a little weirdness) to provide 
multimedia producers with audio solutions. 
Soundelux Media Labs - the noise of art. 

STACCATO SYSTEMS INC. 

2155 Park Blvd. 
PaloAlto, Ca 94306 
staccato@staccatosys.com 
www.staccatosys.com 

BOOTH 1061 

Staccato will demonstrate SynthBuilder, a powerful 
CAD-like tool for building physically modeled 
sound algorithms, and SynthCore, the host based 
physically modeled sound synthesis engine. 
SynthBuilder automatically generates parametric 
algorithms that are extremely realistic and highly 
interactive called SynthScript. A "Virtual Foley" 
door and an interactive car engine will also be 
demonstrated. 

STELLAR SEMICONDUCTOR, INC. 

2355 Oakland Road, Suite #1 

San Jose, CA 95131 

408-955-9663 

408-955-9671 

www.stellarsemi.com 

info@stellarsemi.com 

BOOTH 1663 

Stellar Semiconductor, Inc. has developed an 
unique architecture known as PixelSquirt which 
offers several marked improvements over the tradi- 
tional methods of 3D rendering and enables users 
to offer content at resolutions of 1024x768 and 
higher. Visit our booth to view our demonstration 
and discuss how our technology can assist you in 
your next-generation games. 



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STORMFRONT STUDIOS, INC. 

Marta Daglow 

4040 Civic Center Drive 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

415-479-2800x220 

415-461-3865 

mdaglow@aol.com 

www.stormfrontstudios.com 

JOB FAIR 503 

Top 3D Game Programming & Art Talent: Founded 
in 1988, we're the creators of NASCAR '98 (#1 EA 
title this fall), Madden NFL PC, Star Trek: DS9 and 
the six-year online hit RPG Neverwinter Nights for 
AOL. Our Discovery Channel title "Byzantine" won 
Product of the Year honors in Europe, and is up for 
three 1998 Codies. Our teams use strong planning 
cycles and focus on A+ titles for top publishers like 
EA, Discovery Channel, Maxis, Sony and AOL. 
Please visit our Job Fair booth, #503. 



STREAK TECHNOLOGY 

2213 Ringwood Avenue 

San Jose, CA 95131 

408-432-1613 

408-432-3062 

info@streaktechnology.com 

www.streaktechnology.com 

BOOTH 1259 

Bring your game, suitable for coin-op, to Streak 
Technology. We have over 50 years of combined 
experience in designing, prototyping, and turnkey 
manufacturing services to the coin-op world. 
Deluxe and standard arcade pieces, photo booths, 
and kiosks. For your flight or driving games, we 
specialize in motion platforms. 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. 

8505 Forest Lane, MS 87 11 
Dallas, TX 75243 
972-644-5580 

www.ti.com/sc/3d 

BOOTH 1529 

Texas Instruments will be showing the TVP4020A 
(Permedia™ 2A) graphics processor, one of today's 
leading 2D/3D accelerators. In addition, other demos 
will show ports to today's popular games. Be sure to 
come by booth 1 529 to see the featured demo: a 
big screen, TVP4020A-powered deathmatch. 

THRUSTMASTER, INC. 

7175 N.W. Evergreen Parkway, Suite 400 

Hillsboro, OR 97124 

503-615-3200 

503-615-3300 

www.thrustmaster.com 

BOOTH 1752 

ThrustMaster is known for producing the most real- 



istic and best-functioning game controllers. After 
establishing itself as the leader in flight controllers 
in the early 90's, then capturing the market in the 
racing wheel category, ThrustMaster's broad prod- 
uct line includes action, adventure, sports and 
arcade peripherals. Today, ThrustMaster continues 
to be a leader in the development of innovative 
peripherals, and looks forward to bringing the best 
in PC-based entertainment to consumers. 

TRITECH 
MICROELECTRONICS, INC. 

1440 McCandless Drive 

Milpitas, CA 95035 

408-941-1300 

408-941-1301 

SALES@tritech.st.com 

www.tritechmicro.com 

BOOTH 1149 

TriTech Microelectronics designs its Pyramid3D 
graphics accelerators in various PC applications for 
home entertainment and business. Highlighted are 
the bump-mapping capabilities, which let designers 
create photo-realistic graphics and special effects 
on a mainstream PC platform. Designers can 
enhance object surfaces by implementing metallic 
surfaces, mirror effects, and morphing techniques 
to change object shape and vary degrees of 
transparency. 

VECTOR GRAPHICS 

870 Aileen St. 
Oakland, CA 94608 
510-420-0454 
info@vectorg.com 
www.vectorg.com 

BOOTH 1362 

Real-time 3D art for games: Vector Graphics makes 
professional-quality low-poly 3D models, textures, 
and animations to order. Our experienced team of 
artists are on-site and available for consulting and 
bidding on artwork production, consulting, and 
application development of low-poly human char- 
acters, props, and environments. 

VICON MOTION SYSTEMS 

A subsidiary of Oxford Metrics Ltd. 

15455 Red Hill Ave. 

Tustin, CA 92780 

714-259-1232 

714-259-1509 

brian ©vicon.com 

www.vicon.com 

BOOTH 1761 

Makers of the Vicon optical motion capture system, 
the motion capture tool designed and build for 
production animation. For games producers, the 
Vicon system provides leading-edge technology to 



provide fast, accurate motion data to export to 
your choice of CG packages. The Vicon™ system 
reliability, portability and accuracy, along with out- 
standing customer support, provides game compa- 
nies the elements necessary to create astonishingly . 
realistic character animation. Surround yourself 
with the tools of professionals. 

VIRTOOLS 

93, Rue Vieille du Temple 

Paris, France 75003 

33-1-42-71-46-86 

33-1-42-71-86-53 

info@virtools.com 

www.virtools.com 

BOOTH 1358 

Virtools believes that interactive 3D content, when 
made accessible to designers and authors, will give 
birth to exciting forms of art and entertainment. 
Virtools' goal is to shift 3D content production par- 
adigms from that of "creating the camera" to that 
of "using the camera as a means of expression." 

VIRTUAL SEARCH 

2261 Market Street, #141 
San Francisco, CA 941 14 
800-779-3334x1 
Marc@vsearch.com 
www.vsearch.com 

JOB FAIR 316 

Virtual Search was founded and is staffed by game 
industry professionals. We are more than just head- 
hunters; we are Career Agents who are interested 
in building long-term relationships. Our service 
costs you nothing, yet can mean thousands in your 
pocket! A long-term relationship with Virtual will: 
Maximize Your Compensation, Boost Your Career 
Potential and Ensure Your Career Is Being 
Managed Professionally. Confidentiality is assured! • 

VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 

1 1 1 North Market Street, Suite 655 

San Jose, CA 951 13 

408-367-6153 

408-938-3929 

info@virtually3d.com 

www.virtually3d.com 

BOOTH 1756 

Virtually Unlimited Corp. is a San Jose, California, 
company developing and licensing "3DGM", an 
integrated indoor/outdoor 3D game development 
framework for reducing time-to-market and cost. 
3DGM complements its powerful C/C++ API with a 
shape editor supporting animated 3D Studio MAX 
models, as well as an interactive 3D terrain/level 
editor for game designers. 







VISION SCAPE IMAGING, INC./ 
THE LAB 

5125 Convoy Street, Suite #212 

San Diego, CA 921 11 

619-715-5858 

619-715-5859 

info@vision-scape.com 

www.vision-scape.com 

BOOTH 2038 

VSI is a complete 3D digital effect studio for the 
feature film, commercial, entertainment and video 
game industries. VSI specializes in character anima- 
tion, photo-real CG, special effects, and 3D-cell 
animation. VSI also offers training in 3D animation 
for professionals and those looking to get into the 
CG industry. 

VLSI TECHNOLOGY, INC. 

1109 McKay Drive 
San Jose, CA 95131 
408-434-3100 
408-434-7584 

www.vlsi.com 

BOOTH 814 

VLSI Technology will demonstrate ThunderBird 
128™, a high-performance PCI audio accelerator. 
Jointly developed with QSound Labs, Thunderbird 
128™ is the world's most advanced 3D positional 
audio solution. Giving game developers the power 
to integrate up to 1 28 channels of CD-guality 
audio through industry-standard APIs, the chip 
delivers full-immersion audio without compromis- 
ing PC graphics performance. 



VR-1.INC. 



4888 Pearl East Circle, Suite 101 

Boulder, CO 80301 

303-546-9113 

303-444-2797 

webster@vr1.com 

www.vr1.com 

BOOTH 1037 

VR-1 will be demonstrating its VR-1 Conductor™ 
technology suite to software developers interested 
in creating massively multiplayer games for the 
Internet. VR- 1 Conductor solves the problems 
game developers face when designing games for 
the Internet such as packet loss, latency, and game 
administration. VR-1 Conductor also assists net- 
work operators in the monitoring and maintenance 
of online game hosting. 



WALT DISNEY IMAGINEERING 

1401 Flower Street 
Glendale, CA 91221-5020 

JOB FAIR 301 

From concept through completion, Walt Disney 
Imagineering creates the Disney resorts, theme 
parks and attractions, and is involved in real estate 
development, location-based entertainment 
venues, and cyberspace/new media projects. 



WESTWOOD STUDIOS/VIRGIN 
INTERACTIVE 

2400 N. Tenaya Way 
Las Vegas, NV 89 128 
702-228-4040 
702-228-3939 
www.westwood.com 

JOB FAIR 411 

Westwood Studios is a prominent publisher of 
best-selling PC, Macintosh, and next-generation 
console games such as Blade Runner and the 
Command & Conquer product line. By combining 
cutting-edge technology, enchanting graphics, and 
superior game design, Westwood has become a 
leading force in the world of interactive software. 
For the latest news and information, contact us or 
visit our website at www.westwood.com. 

WINDOWS DEVELOPER'S 
JOURNAL 

R&D Publications-Miller Freeman, Inc.. 
1601 W. 23rd St., Ste. 200 
Lawrence, KS 66046 
913-841-1631 
913-841-2624 

BOOTH 1143 

Windows/DOS Developer's Journal provides 
advanced, serious, and technical information for 
professional Windows and DOS programmers. Each 
issue includes articles on all aspects of building 
applications for Windows and DOS, including pro- 
gram design, device control and debugging. Please 
stop by our booth for a complimentary copy. 

WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 

7000 West Third Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90048 
213-782-4511 
213-782-4810 

www.wga.org 

BOOTH 1859 

Need someone who can breathe life into your pro- 
ject? Someone who writes brilliant dialogue, cre- 
ates believable characters, understands game play- 
ers and game design? Look no further. Meet 
America's Storytellers at booth #1859. And join us 



at our suite for our Annual Chili and Beer Bash on 
Wednesday night. 

YOSEMITE ENTERTAINMENT/ 
SIERRA ON-LINE 

3380 146th PISE, #300 
Bellevue.WA 98007 
425-649-9800 
425-641-7617 
www.sierra.com 

JOB FAIR 400 

Yosemite Entertainment, the newly renamed devel- 
opment studio situated in the birthplace location of 
industry pioneer Sierra On-Line®, Inc., remains one 
of today's most prominent and progressive creators 
of leading-edge games. 1998 titles include Daryl F. 
Gates' Police Quest: SWAT 2, Quest for Glory V: 
Dragon Fire and The Realm (a massively multiplayer 
online community), followed soon after by the 
highly anticipated release of a Babylon 5-based 
space combat sim. Upcoming titles under the 
Yosemite Entertainment brand - which will be 
unveiled on Hospitality Suite Night! - will even fur- 
ther showcase the studio's forward-looking strate- 
gy of producing must-have games based on story- 
driven, character-rich universes, featuring outstand- 
ing music, graphics, and technology. 

ZEN RESEARCH, INC. 

20400 Stevens Creek Blvd. 
Cupertino, CA 95014 
408-863-2700 
408-863-2772 
info@zenresearch.com 

BOOTH 840 

Zen Research designs and produces high-perfor- 
mance CD and DVD-ROM optical drive compo- 
nents. Through creative innovation and revolution- 
ary component design, Zen has developed TrueX™ 
technology, which dramatically improves optical 
disc drive performance, delivering a sustained 
transfer rate, anywhere on the disc. Visit our booth 
and experience the performance difference 
yourself. 




NEW PRODUCTS 




ACT LABS LTD. 

230-6651 Fraserwood Place 

Richmond, BCV6W 1J3 CANADA 

604-278-3650 

604-278-3612 

hyper@actlab.com 

www.actlab.com 

BOOTH 1659 

The Force RS Racing System uses Immersion's I- 
FORCE technology to support a myriad of force- 
feedback effects. Its design incorporates an F1 -style 
racing wheel with 280 degrees of rotation, butter- 
fly gear shifters, HYPER programmable buttons and 
realistic gas/brake pedals. Also planned is the car- 
tridge-based, multi-platform Act Labs RS Racing 
System. 

ALLIANCE SEMICONDUCTOR 

3699 N. First Street 
San Jose, CA 95134 
408-383-4900 
408-383-4999 

BOOTH 1863 

Alliance Semiconductor announced its new AGP 1X 
2D/3D/Video accelerator chips for desktop PCs, the 
Paladin. Unlike the majority of AGP 1X graphics 
accelerators on the market, the Paladin supports 
sideband addressing to achieve the full 264 MB/s 
transfer rate of the AGP 1X standard. This allows 
OEMs to obtain the maximum speed from their 
AGP 1X products. 



AMOA 

c/o 383 Dovercourt Drive 
Winnipeg, MB R3Y 1G4 
800-886-5865 

BOOTH 1305 

The AMOA, which represents 80% of the arcade 
game machines in America, sets hardware and 
software standards for the arcade industry. A sub- 
sidiary, NANI, designs Direct X- and Direct 3D- 
based DirectArcade interfaces for Public PCs, and 
assists developers in selling PC games in coin-op. 
DirectArcade is available at www.nani.org 

ANIMATION MAGAZINE 

30101 Agoura Court, Suite 110 
Agoura Hills, CA 91301-4301 
818-991-2884 
818-991-3773 

BOOTH 2139 

The 2 1 5-page 1 998 Animation Industry Directory 
contains an almanac, timeline and 80 pages of 
articles including the 10 Hottest Issues, 10 
Companies to Watch; and Most Influential People 
along with contact information and descriptions of 
more than 6,000 firms involved in creating, pro- 
ducing, distributing, training and eguipping the 
animation industry. 



#' 




CHROMATIC RESEARCH, INC. 

615Tasman Dr. 
Sunnyvale, CA 94089 
408-752-9100 
info@chromatic.com 
www.chromatic.com 

BOOTH 1721 

Chromatic Research, in partnership with LG 
Semicon, SGS-THOMSON and Toshiba, introduces 
Mpact 2 3DVD media processor technology. Mpact 
2 3DVD is the first and only solution to make the 
combination of high-performance 3D graphics 
acceleration and DVD cost-effective for sub-$1000 
PCs. Mpact technology is used by industry leaders 
such as Diamond Multimedia, STB, Compag, 
Gateway 2000, and Micron. Mpact technology pro- 
vides hardware acceleration for arcade-quality 
3D/2D, DVD video and audio, advanced wavetable 
synthesisis and 56K modems. 

CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 

26071 Merit Circle, Suite 108 

Laguna Hills, CA 92653 

714-582-1946 

800-722-7748 

714-582-3706 

sales@ceti.com 

www.ceti.com 

BOOTH 1760 

We will be introducing our latest product to our 
Pro's family: ProStudio Line, our studio editing solu- 
tion computer system (designed for Microsoft NT). 
It is an all-in-one content creation & media man- 
agement application, offering integrated video and 
audio editing, special effects, compositing, titling, 
and project management tools. 
System Features include: 

Dual Intel Pentium II 333 MHz Processor Hot-Swap 
Hard drives and power supply 
Dual channel ultra-wide SCSI 
36- 180 GB RAID storage solution 
512 MB SDRAM 
Dedicated 9 GB audio drive 



ELSA 

2231 CalleDeLuna 
Santa Clara, CA 95054 
408-919-9100 
408-919-9120 

BOOTH 1343 

GLoria-XXL is the newest high-end graphics accel- 
erator demonstrating clear gains in performance for 
demanding 3D animation and high-end visualiza- 






fl 



tion. Equipped with a fast AGP bus and the latest 
3D chip technology, ELSA's GLoria-XXL is setting 
new perfomance standards in PC workstations. 
MAXtreme is an optimized OpenGL driver for 3D 
Studio MAX R2, which optimizes the graphics 
pipeline. Integrated with the ELSA Gloria line, 
MAXtreme allows users significant performance 
gain over standard OpenGL and HEIDI solutions. It 
is configurable by the user through an integrated 
utility. 

GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON 
TECHNOLOGY GROUP 

2855 Campus Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94403 
650-572-2700 
650-572-9675 
www.gravis.com 

BOOTH 1648 

Xterminator™ Digital Game Controller - the most 
powerful game controller on the planet! 
Dominates all types of games.. .even flight sims. 
Xterminator provides an arsenal of firepower with 
19 programmable functions and proportional con- 
trol for joystick and steering-like accuracy and real- 
istic gameplay. Loaded with features like preset 
controls for instant action, 2 digital triggers, 8-way 
POV switch, throttle and more. Windows® 95 
compatible. Full 3-year warranty. Model #4401 1. 

INFORMATION PACKAGING 
CORPORATION 

1670N.WayneportRd. 
Macedon, NY 14502 
800-776-7633 
315-986-4585 
mikeh@infopkg.com 

BOOTH 1853 

Information Packaging Corporation will be releas- 
ing its new packaging design called the "ACCORD- 
A-BOX". Designed to hold single or multiple CDs 
and a booklet, the paperboard cover provides an 
abundant area for graphics while the CDs are 
secured in highly protective TYVEK sleeves. 

INTERACT ACCESSORIES, INC. 

9611 Pulaski Park Drive, Suite 309 

Baltimore, MD 21220 

410-238-2424 

410-238-1427 

www.interact-acc.com 

www.gameshark.com 

BOOTH 1249 

InterAct will be launching a variety of exciting new 
peripherals, including the re-launch of our Advent 
multimedia speaker line, a revolutionary new 
Nintendo64™ controller/technology, unique data 



exchange devices, and a handful of other innova- 
tive products that will be available for a wide range 
of co-promotional opportunities. 

KESMAI CORPORATION 

230 Court Square 
Charlottesville, VA 22902 
804-963-8500 
804-963-8828 
www.gamestorm.com 

BOOTH 1129 

Kesmai, the leader in massively multiplayer online 
games, announces GameStorm, an Internet-based 
game service featuring the best multiplayer games 
including Air Warrior III, Aliens Online, Jack 
Nicklaus Online Golf Tour, and many others. 
Members can also play games from Engage 
GamesOnline and access content from SegaSoft's 
Heat.net. GameStorm offers it all for a flat rate of 
$9.95 per month. 

KINETIX, INC. 

642 Harrison Street 
San Francisco, CA 94107 
415-507-6504 
415-507-6116 
www.ktx.com 

BOOTH 1813 

Character Studio is a hybrid, professional character 
animation system for 3D Studio MAX R2. The 
Character Studio 2.0 release offers enhanced foot- 
step and freeform animation, integrated motion 
capture management, comprehensive new skin 
behavior, and over 1 50 optically sampled motion 
capture samples. 



METROWERKS 

Dept 334, P.O. Box 9700 

Austin, TX 78758 

512-873-4700 

512-873-4900 

info@metrowerks.com 

www.metrowerks.com 

BOOTH 1448 

CodeWarrior Professional Release 3 includes inline 
assembly support for AMD's new 3-D instruction 
set. Programmers get complete control of optimiza- 
tion for AMD-3D technology on a per-function 
basis. CodeWarrior utilizes vectorization compiler 
techniques to take advantage of the new AMD-3D 
technology's parallel instruction capabilities to 
enhance performance of multimedia applications. 

MICROPROSE 

2490 Mariner Square Loop 
Alameda, CA 94501 
www.microprose.com 
www.gathering.net 

JOB FAIR 407 

MicroProse excels in technologies such as 3-D sim- 
ulation, artificial game intelligence and networked 
game-play capabilities increasingly critical to PC 
entertainment software. The company's product 
line features some of the industry's top brand fran- 
chises, including: Falcon, the leader in air combat 
simulation, Civilization, X-COM and Master of 
Orion strategy games, Star Trek: The Next 
Generation series of action and strategy games and 
MechWarrior action simulation game set in the 
BattleTech Universe. 




r ^^^b JHHF 





MOTION ANALYSIS CORPORATION 

3617Westwind Blvd. 
Santa Rosa, CA 95403 
707-579-6500 phone 
707-526-0629 fax 
info@motionanalysis.com 
www.motionanalysis.com 

BOOTH 1161 

MoCap Solver software fits skeletons to fixed bone 
lengths. Potential skin tearing: MoCap-Solver 
reduces skin tearing by eliminating bone stretching 
and compression. Foot sliding: MoCap-Solver elimi- 
nates foot sliding by fixing bone length and 
weighting foot markers. The CG skeleton can be 
"best fitted" to the skin design. New Plug-ins: 
Maya, Alias, Softimage, 3DStudio Max 



CURRENT AND 



THE WEB @ 
WWW.CGDC.COM 



t 



MULTIGEN INC., 

550 South Winchester Blvd., Suite 500 

San Jose, CA 95128 

408 261 4100 

408 261 4101 

sales@multigen.com 

www.multigen.com 

BOOTH 1337 

MultiGen Creator™, the first complete interactive 
realtime 3D modeling and assembly system for 
Windows NT™, delivers WYSIWYG development, 
complete hierarchical database control, seamless 
interactivity, LOD, DOF, exact control and interactive 
deformation of geometry, instancing, automatic 
BSP, polygon reduction, image optimization, 
bounding volumes, graphics pipeline control. 
Extensible OpenFlight® format. NIFF, HMD. 

NVIDIA CORPORATION 

1226 Tiros Way 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 
408-617-4000 
408-617-4100 
www.nvidia.com 

BOOTH 1229 

NVIDIA will be demonstrating its new RIVATNTTM, 
the first integrated single-pass multi-texturing 
processor that delivers a mind-blowing 200 million 



pixels-per-second. RIVATNT's dual-pixel 32-bit 
color pipeline, 24-bit Z-buffer, 8-bit stencil and per- 
pixel precision delivers unsurpassed quality and 
performance allowing developers to create games 
with stunning visual effects and realism. 

POLHEMUS, INC. 

One Hercules Drive 
PO Box 560 
Colchester, VT 05446 
800-357-4777 
802-655-3159 
802-655-1439 
www.polhemus.com 
sales@polhemus.com 

BOOTH 1443 

Polhemus develops, manufactures, and markets 
motion tracking and motion capture systems. At 
CGDC 1998, Polhemus will debut its low-cost, 
high-speed, high accuracy, low-latency motion cap- 
ture system. The FASTRAK®8 uses 1 to 8 receivers 
for motion capture, virtual reality, medical, anima- 
tion and simulation applications. FASTRAK®8 will 
be offered at a special 30-day show price of 
$1 1,995 for an 8-receiver system. 

QSOUND LABS, INC. 

2748 37th Avenue, N.E. 
Calgary, Alberta T1Y5L3 
403-291-2492 
403-250-1521 fax 
sales@qsound.com 
www.qsound.com 

BOOTH 814 

QMDX is a free, high-level sound system for 2D 
and 3D audio development on the PC. Solving sig- 
nificant 3D audio resource management issues, 
QMDX supports all DS3D-compliant hardware 
accelerators and provides improved stereo mixing 
for non-accelerated systems. The high-level, fea- 
ture-rich API saves significant development effort. 

QUANTUM3D, INC. 

2520 Mission College Blvd. Suite 202 

Santa Clara, CA 95054 

408-919-9999 

408-919-9980 

info@quantum3d.com 

BOOTH 1702 

The Quicksilver PC system is optimized for content 
creation for realtime entertainment applications for 
home, arcade, and LBE. Quicksilver includes the 
Intel 333 MHz processor, 128 MB RAM, Windows 
NT/95, and runs Windows-based software requir- 
ing OpenGL. Quicksilver is integrated with 
Quantum3D ArcadePC components including the 
Obsidian2 graphics accelerators, GCI, and 
Gameframe. 



RAD GAME TOOLS 

850 S. Main Street 
Salt Lake City, UT 84101 
801-322-4300 
mitchs@radgametools.com 
www.radgametools.com 

BOOTH 1437 

RAD Game Tools has released the latest version of 
the Miles Sound System, version 4.0. This new ver- 
sion has complete DLS-1 MIDI support (including a 
digital software synthesizer) for great-sounding 
MIDI, and ADPCM digital compression support to 
keep your audio RAM budget low. 
RAD Game Tools has released the latest version of 
Smacker, version 3.2. This new version now sup- 
ports QuickTime 3 for movie importing, so 
QuickTime files, digital video files, and other QT3- 
supported media types can be directly imported. 

RAINDROP GEOMAGIC, INC. 

206 N Randolph St 

Suite 520 

Champaign, IL 61820 

217-239-2551 

217-239-2556 

inquiry@geomagic.com 

www.geomagic.com 

BOOTH 1153 

Raindrop Geomagic®, Inc.. announces the latest 
release of the Wrap Lite 1 . 1 software for 
MicroScribe arms, the desktop digitizers produced 
by Immersion. This innovative modeling software 
drastically simplifies the surface reconstruction 
process. Now, modeling a 3D object is as simple as 
coloring a picture book. Just scribble on the surface 
of your favorite object with the digitizer, and Wrap 
Lite will do the rest. Wrap Lite will run on Windows 
NT, Windows 95, and Silicon Graphics worksta- 
tions. A free evaluation copy can be downloaded 
from the company's website www.geomagic.com. 

REAL 3D 

12506 Lake Underhill Rd. MP-81 1 

Orlando, FL 32825 

800-393-7730 

407-306-3358 

real3d@real3d.com 

www.real3d.com 

BOOTH 1821 

Real 3D will demonstrate its new family of 
3D/2D/video graphics boards called the StarFighter. 
The StarFighter is powered by the new Intel740 
graphics accelerator, which Real 3D co-developed 
with Intel. The StarFighter offers the industry's best 
combination of performance and image quality in a 
mainstream graphics board. 





REALITY FUSION, INC. 

503 Van Ness Avenue 

Santa Cruz, CA 95060 

408-420-0520 

408-420-0523 

corpinfo@realityfusion.com 

www.realityfusion.com 

BOOTH 1657 

Reality Fusion's FreeAction Technology is a power- 
ful new interface that enables users to control a 
computer without a keyboard, joystick, mouse or 
microphone. This licensable technology and a video 
camera can add a revolutionary user experience to 
your applications; allowing you to bounce a ball 
with your hands, battle an opponent with your 
arms and legs, and more. 

REM INFOGRAFICA SA 

Plaza Santa Barbara, n°1 0-2 
Madrid 28004, Spain 
34-1-31941 55 
34-1-31941 74 
info@infografica.com 
www.infografica.com 

BOOTH 2042 

The REM 3D MODEL BANK is the world's most 
comprehensive collection of photo-realistic, fully 
textured, ready-to-use 3D models. Each model is 
supplied in 4 levels of detail - ideal for use in 
games. REM Infografica also specializes in custom 
modeling. 

RENDITION, INC. 

999 E.Arques Avenue 

Sunnyvale, CA 94086 

408-822-0100 

408-822-0199 

info@rendition.com 

www.rendition.com 

BOOTH 1629 

Rendition and Fujitsu Microelectronics, Inc. (FMI) 
have joined forces to create graphics solutions that 
overcome CPU-based performance restraints. 
Today, graphics accelerators rely on the host to 
perform geometry and lighting tasks, causing sig- 
nificant application performance penalties. By com- 
bining Rendition's V2200 with FMI's geometry 
processor, the host is free to perform application- 
specific tasks and desired graphics performance is 
achieved, regardless of CPU speed. 



SCITECH SOFTWARE, INC. 

505 Wall Street 
Chico, CA 95928 
530-894-8400 
530-894-9069 
info@scitechsoft.com 

BOOTH 2141 

SctiTech MGL is a professional graphics library for 
creating high-performance games in the shortest 
amount of time. SciTech MGL 4.05 is available free 
with full source code! SciTech Display Doctor 6.5 is 
the only universal Windows 95 display driver which 
ensures DirectDraw games operate properly on all 
graphics hardware. 

SEGASOFT NETWORKS, INC. 

150 Shoreline Drive 

Redwood City, CA 94065 

650-654-3400 

650-654-2592 

www.segasoft.com 

www.heat.net 

BOOTH 2129 

SegaSoft's HEAT.NET Internet Game Network 
(www.heat.net) is the premiere Internet gaming 
platform combining original SegaSoft and third- 
party games, commerce, community and competi- 
tive features into the ultimate online gaming 
arena. HEAT.NET offers both free and premium 
membership but only Premium members are able 
to use their Degrees, HEAT.NET frequent-player 
points, to purchase merchandise in HEAT's online 
store. 

SOFTIMAGE 

3510 Blvd. St.-Laurent, Suite 400 
Montreal, Quebec Canada H2X 2V2 
1-800-576-3846x8871 phone 
Softimage.com/cgdc 

BOOTH 1317 & 1913 

SOFTIMAGE|3D is the industry standard for profes- 
sional character animation and premium-quality 
game production. The SOFTIMAGE|3D product line 
incorporates a complete suite of game develop- 
ment tools, including the new SOFTIMAGE|GDK, a 
high-level C++ toolset which allows developers to 
quickly design and implement custom conversion 
tools between SOFTIMAGE|3D and real-time game 
engines. 



SONY INTERACTIVE STUDIOS 
AMERICA, INC. 

989 Hillsdale Boulevard, 4th Floor 
Foster City, CA 94404 
650-655-8000 
650-655-8024 
www.sonyinteractive.com 

BOOTH 929 

Sony Interactive Studios America (SISA) develops 
and publishes software for PC and online markets 
and will feature three new PC titles to release this 
year: Cyberstrike II™, NFL Gameday™ '99, and 
Everquest™. 

SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE 
DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

c/o Sony Pictures Imageworks 
9050 West Washington Boulevard 
Culver City, CA 90232-2518 
internetinfo@spimageworks.com 
www.community-place.com 

BOOTH 2135 

Sony's Community Place Conductor is a sophisti- 
cated VRML97 and Java 1 . 1 authoring tool that 
allows you to develop VRML/Java worlds, in real- 
time, using simple drag-and-drop metaphors. 
Features include support for the VRML97 specifica- 
tion, an integrated keyframer, a visual ROUTE edi- 
tor, an object and script library, and many other 
tools. 

SOUND IDEAS /IMAGE IDEAS 

105 West Beaver Creek Rd. 
Richmond Hill, ON. L4B 1C6, Canada 
905-886-5000 
905-886-6800 

BOOTH 1939 

New Releases in 1998 include: SFX of Rocky & 
Bullwinkle, Disney Ideas Sampler and Series 
8000 — the Sci-Fi Collection. They join a powerful 
lineup of high-quality sound libraries that includes: 
Series 1000-7000, LucasFilm, Universal, Warner 
Bros., Hanna-Barbera, Twentieth Century Fox and 
Turner Entertainment libraries. They include every- 
thing from Sci-Fi to "revitalized classic sounds." 

STACCATO SYSTEMS INC. 

2155 Park Blvd. 
Palo Alto, Ca 94306 
staccato@staccatosys.com 
www.staccatosys.com 

BOOTH 1061 

Staccato will introduce SynthBuilder, a powerful 
CAD-like tool for building physically modeled 
sound algorithms, and SynthCore, the host-based 
physically modeled sound-synthesis engine. 





W' 



SynthBuilder automatically generates parametric 
algorithms that are extremely realistic and highly 
interactive called SynthScript. A "Virtual Foley" 
door and an interactive car engine will be 
demonstrated. 

STELLAR SEMICONDUCTOR, IMC. 

2355 Oakland Road, Suite #1 

San Jose, CA 95131 

408-955-9663 

408-955-9671 

www.stellarsemi.com 

info@stellarsemi.com 

BOOTH 1663 

The AquilaPX is a low-cost high-performance 
2D/3D/Video graphics chip. The rendering engine 
utilizes and takes advantage of a no-z-buffer mem- 
ory architecture, increasing the resolution and 
number of textures that can be stored in any given 
memory configuration. In addition, an on-chip 230 
MHz RAMDAC and flicker-free filtering video DACs 
provide outstanding TV video/text output. 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. 

8505 Forest Lane, MS 8711 
Dallas, Texas 75243 
972-644-5580 phone 
www.ti.com/sc/3d 

BOOTH 1529 

Texas Instruments has announced theTVP4020A 
(P2A), a high-performance, lower-cost 3D graphics 
processor that is pin-for-pin and 100% software 
compatible with Tl's TVP4020 (3DLabs' 
Permedia™ 2 device), which was announced in 
1997. The new device operates at 100 MHz and 
the integrated RAMDAC speed has been increased 
to 250 MHz for improved performance. The new 
device consumes one-third less power compared to 
the previous version, and complies with the PCI 
Bus Power Management Interface Specification for 
PC 98. 

VECTOR GRAPHICS 

870 Aileen St. 

Oakland, CA 94608 
510-420-0454 
info@vectorg.com 
www.vectorg.com 

BOOTH 1362 

Zoom, the newest RT3D demo, is debuting at the 
CGDC! With 3 sliders — yaw, pitch, zoom — you 
can zoom down to a single freckle, a pore, a cell, a 
molecule, an atom - and back to the street, the 
block, the city, state, continent, and the whole 
planet... in full RT3D. NVIDIA's newest 3D accelera- 
tor allows Zoom to use 20+MB of 32-bit textures, 
5-figure face counts, and effects like as lens flare, 
environment mapping, multiple textures, and full 



alpha blending... all on a Win95 PC. Zoom: the 
hottest way to see the newest RT3D effects at the 
CGDC. 



CHECK OUT THE 

ADDENDUM FOR 

UPDATED INFO ON 

CGDC CLASSES 



VICON MOTION SYSTEMS 

Vicon is a subsidiary of Oxford Metrics Ltd. 

15455 Red Hill Ave. 

Tustin. CA 92780 

714-259-1232 

714-259-1509 

brian ©vicon.com 

BOOTH 1761 

Vicon 370 release 2.5 

This new release cuts processing time with several 
"hands off" processing tools. Vicon now automati- 
cally identifies markers for different parts of the body 
for each character in the scene. Pipeline processing 
allows you to select the tools you wish to apply 
based on your individual requirements. Hint: Don't 
tell your boss how much time this will save you. 
BodyBuilder Release 3.5 

New editing tools save you time preparing the data 
for export to your choice of CG packages. New 
BodyLanguage models add flexibility when creating 
skeletal data from marker data. 

VIRTOOLS 

93, Rue Vieille du Temple 

Paris, France 75003 

33-1-42-71-46-86 

33-1-42-71-86-53 

info@virtools.com 

www.virtools.com 

BOOTH 1358 

NEMO is a user-friendly interactive-3D-content 
authoring tool that lets you play the game as you 
create it, prototype in minutes and produce impres- 
sive content. Targeted at game designers and 
developers, NEMO's object-oriented behavior 
engine allows reuse of existing materials to opti- 
mize production time and costs. 



VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 

1 1 1 North Market Street, Suite 655 

San Jose, CA 951 13 

408-367-6153 

408-938-3929 

info@virtually3d.com 

www.virtually3d.com 

BOOTH 1756 

3DGM is an indoor/outdoor 3D game development, 
framework forWin95/NT and MacOS. More than j 
just a polygon engine, 3DGM complements its 
powerful C/C++ API with both shape- and 
terrain/level editing tools. 3DGM supports animat- ' 
ed 3D Studio MAX models, 3 Dfx, Direct3D, fast 
software rendering (8 & 16 bit color), large 3D 
worlds, polygon-precise collision detection, proce- 
dural scenery and more. 

VISION SCAPE IMAGING, INC./ 
THE LAB 

5125 Convoy Street, Suite #212 

San Diego, California 921 11 

619-715-5858 

619-71 5-5859 fax 

info@vision-scape.com 

www.vision-scape.com 

BOOTH 2038 

Vision Scape Imaging, Inc. has a variety of 3D- 
related products that are for sale on the web site. 
They include an extensive library of textured and 
surfaced 3D characters with animation; a cost- 
effective game engine that allows users to quickly 
navigate through highly detailed 3D environments; j 
and a variety of custom plug-ins developed in- 
house. 

VR-1 INC. 

4888 Pearl East Circle, Suite 101 

Boulder, CO 80301 

303-546-9113 

303-444-2797 

webster@vr1.com 

www.vr1.com 

BOOTH 1037 

VR-1 will be demonstrating its VR-1 Conductor™ \ 
technology suite to software developers interested j 
in creating massively multiplayer games for the 
Internet. VR-1 Conductor solves the problems 
game developers face when designing games for 
the Internet such as packet loss, latency, and game 
administration. VR- 1 Conductor also assists net- 
work operators in the monitoring and maintenance 
of online game hosting. 






PRODUCT LOCATOR 



PLATFORMS 




VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 


■ ■•■ ■ ■ ■ WaBIWIW 




VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 


1756 






WRITER'S GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


DOS 

3DFX INTERACTIVE 


1111 


INTERNET/ WORLD WIDE WEB 




3NAME3D 


1248 


3NAME3D 


1248 


ABSOLUTE QUALITY 


836 


ABSOLUTE QUALITY 


836 


ACT LABS 


1659 


AMD 


1429 


ASCENSION TECHNOLOGY CORP. 


1156 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


ELSA INC. 


1343 


GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON TECHNOLOGY GROUP 


1648 


ENGAGE GAMES ONLINE 


1129 


KINETIX 


1813 


KESMAI CORPORATION 


1129 


LOGITECH 


1837 


THE MOTION FACTORY 


1621 


MOTION ANALYSIS CORP. 


1161 


POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 


POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 


RAD GAME TOOLS 


1437 


SEGASOFT NETWORKS, INC. 


2129 


RENDITION 


1629 


SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


SAITEK INDUSTRIES LTD. 


1861 


SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


THRUSTMASTER, INC. 


1752 


SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 


1939 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 


STACCATO SYSTEMS 


1061 


WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 






VR-1, INC. 


937 


UNIX/DERIVATIVE 




WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


3NAME3D 


1248 






ASCENSION TECHNOLOGY CORP. 


1156 


WINDOWS NT 




CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


3DFX INTERACTIVE 


1111 


MOTION ANALYSIS CORP. 


1161 


3NAME3D 


1248 


POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 


ABSOLUTE QUALITY 


836 


RAINDROP GEOMAGIC, INC. 


1153 


ACCELGRAPHICS, INC. 


1943 


REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 


AMD 


1429 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 


ANIMATEK INTERNATIONAL 


1754 


WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


ASCENSION TECHNOLOGY CORP. 


1156 






AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR 


1620 


MACINTOSH 




CALIGARI CORPORATION 


1548 






CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


3DFX INTERACTIVE 


1111 






3NAME3D 


1248 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


DWANGO/INTERACTIVE VISUAL SYSTEMS CORP. 


2029 


ABSOLUTE QUALITY 


836 


ELSA INC. 


1343 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 










INSTALLSHIELD SOFTWARE CORP. 


1941 


GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON TECHNOLOGY GROUP 


1648 










INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 


1913 


METROWERKS 


1448 










KINETIX 


1813 


NEWTEK 


1929 










LIGHTSCAPE TECHNOLOGIES 


1762 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


METROWERKS 


1448 


RAD GAME TOOLS 


1437 






REAL 3D 


1821 


MOTION ANALYSIS CORP. 


1161 


THE MOTION FACTORY 


1621 


REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 


NEWTEK 


1929 


SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


NVIDIA 


1229 


STACCATO SYSTEMS 


1061 



t ^^^b 





^9 



PEAK PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGIES 


1253 


POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


QUANTUM 3D 


1702 


RAD GAME TOOLS 


1437 


RAINDROP GEOMAGIC, INC. 


1153 


REAL 3D 


1821 


REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 


REM INFOGRAFICA 


2042 


RENDITION 


1629 


SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


STACCATO SYSTEMS 


1061 


STELLAR SEMICONDUCTORS, INC. 


1663 


TRITECH MICROELECTRONICS, INC. 


1149 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 


VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 


1756 


VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC., THE LAB 


2038 


WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


CD ROM 




ABSOLUTE QUALITY 


836 


AMD 


1429 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


ELSAINC. 


1343 


GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON TECHNOLOGY GROUP 


1648 


INFORMATION PACKAGING CORP. 


1853 


KINETIX 


1813 


LOGITECH 


1837 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


RAD GAME TOOLS 


1437 


RENDITION 


1629 


SEGASOFT NETWORKS, INC. 


2129 


SONY INTERACTIVE STUDIOS AMERICA 


929 


SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 


1939 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 


VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 


1756 


WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


DVD 




ABSOLUTE QUALITY 


836 


AMD 


1429 


CHROMATIC RESEARCH 


1721 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


ELSAINC. 


1343 


INFORMATION PACKAGING CORP. 


1853 


INTERACT ACCESSORIES, INC. 


1249 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


RAD GAME TOOLS 


1437 


RENDITION 


1629 


SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 


1939 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 



WRITER'S GUILD OF AMERICA 



GAME CONSOLES 



1859 



3NAME3D 


1248 


ABSOLUTE QUALITY 


836 


ACT LABS 


1659 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


INTERACT ACCESSORIES, INC. 


1249 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 


SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 


1939 


TRITECH MICROELECTRONICS, INC. 


1149 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 


WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


LOCATION-BASED ENTERTAINMENT 




3NAME3D 


1248 


AMD 


1429 


KINETIX 


1813 


MOTION ANALYSIS CORP. 


1161 


POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 


QUANTUM 3D 


1702 


REAL 3D 


1821 


REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 


SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


STACCATO SYSTEMS 


1061 


STELLAR SEMICONDUCTORS, INC. 


1663 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 


WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


WINDOWS 3.X795/98 




3DFX INTERACTIVE 


1111 


ABSOLUTE QUALITY 


836 


ACCELGRAPHICS, INC. 


1943 


ACT LABS 


1659 


AMD 


1429 


AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR 


1620 


CAUGARI CORPORATION 


1548 


CHROMATIC RESEARCH 


1721 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


ELSA INC. 


1343 


ENGAGE GAMES ONLINE 


1129 


GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON TECHNOLOGY GROUP 


1648 


INSTALLSHIELD SOFTWARE CORP. 


1941 


INTERACT ACCESSORIES, INC. 


1249 


INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 


1913 


LIGHTSCAPE TECHNOLOGIES 


1762 


LOGITECH 


1837 


METROWERKS 


1448 


THE MOTION FACTORY 


1621 




NEWTEK 


1929 


WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


NVIDIA 


1229 






PEAK PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGIES 


1253 


CABLE/BROADCAST TELEVISION 




POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 


AMD 


1429 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


QUANTUM 3D 


1702 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


RAD GAME TOOLS 


1437 


ELSA INC. 


1343 


RAINDROP GEOMAGIC, INC. 


1153 


KINETIX 


1813 


REAL 3D 


1821 


POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 


REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


RENDITION 


1629 


SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 


1939 


SAITEK INDUSTRIES LTD. 


1861 


WRITER'S GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 






SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


CDR 




SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 


1939 








INFORMATION PACKAGING CORP. 


1853 


STACCATO SYSTEMS 


1061 






STELLAR SEMICONDUCTORS, INC. 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. 


1663 
1529 


INSTALLATION/INTERNET TOOLS 




THRUSTMASTER, INC. 


1752 


INSTALLSHIELD SOFTWARE CORP. 


1941 


TRITECH MICROELECTRONICS, INC. 


1149 






VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 


FILM 




VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 


1756 


POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 


VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC., THE LAB 


2038 






WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


VISUAL SIMULATION 








QUANTUM 3D 


1702 


COMMERCIAL ONLINE SERVICES 








3NAME3D 


1248 


INTERACTIVE TV 




ABSOLUTE QUALITY 


836 


REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 






ENGAGE GAMES ONLINE 


1129 


— TYPE OF COMPANY - 




KESMAI CORPORATION 


1129 






QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 






SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


ASSOCIATION/USER GROUP 




SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 


1939 










VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC/THE LAB 


2038 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 






WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


DEVELOPMENT TOOLS 




ARCADE-BASED GAMES 




ANIMATEK INTERNATIONAL 


1754 






ASCENSION TECHNOLOGY CORP. 


1156 


3DFX INTERACTIVE 


1111 






3NAME3D 
ELSA INC. 


1248 
1343 


CALIGARI CORPORATION 


1548 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


KINETIX 


1813 










ELSA INC. 


1343 


POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 










INSTALLSHIELD SOFTWARE CORP. 


1941 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


LIGHTSCAPE TECHNOLOGIES 


1762 


QUANTUM 3D 


1702 


METROWERKS 


1448 


REAL 3D 


1821 










MINOLTA CORP. 


830 


REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 


MOTION ANALYSIS CORP. 


1161 


SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 










THE MOTION FACTORY 


1621 


STACCATO SYSTEMS 


1061 


NEWTEK 


1929 


STELLAR SEMICONDUCTORS, INC. 


1663 


PEAK PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGIES 


1253 


STREAK TECHNOLOGY 


1259 






TRITECH MICROELECTRONICS, INC. 


1149 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 
QUANTUM 3D 


814 
1702 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


1362 







r 



AME DEVELOP 





RAD GAME TOOLS 1437 

RAINDROP GEOMAGIC, INC. 1153 

REAL 3D 1821 

REALITY FUSION, INC. 1657 

REM INFOGRAFICA 2042 

SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 2135 

VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 1756 

VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC/THE LAB 2038 

PUBLISHER 

KESMAI CORPORATION 1129 

SEGASOFT NETWORKS, INC. 2129 

SONY INTERACTIVE STUDIOS AMERICA 929 

DEVELOPER 

KINETIX 1813 

SONY INTERACTIVE STUDIOS AMERICA 929 

VECTOR GRAPHICS 1362 

VR-1.INC. 937 

CONTENT AGGREGATOR 

DWANGO/INTERACTIVE VISUAL SYSTEMS CORP. 2029 

ENGAGE GAMES ONLINE 1129 

KESMAI CORPORATION 1129 

SEGASOFT NETWORKS, INC. 2129 

SONY INTERACTIVE STUDIOS AMERICA 929 

GAME-RELATED CONSUMER PRODUCTS 

ACT LABS 1659 

CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 1760 

GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON TECHNOLOGY GROUP 1648 

INTERACT ACCESSORIES, INC. 1249 

INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 1913 

LOGITECH 1837 

REAL 3D 1821 

SAITEK INDUSTRIES LTD. 1861 

STELLAR SEMICONDUCTORS, INC. 1663 

THRUSTMASTER, INC. 1752 

GAMING PLATFORM/CORE TECHNOLOGY 

3DFX INTERACTIVE 1111 

ACCELGRAPHICS, INC. 1943 

AMD 1429 

AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR 1620 

CHROMATIC RESEARCH 1721 

INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 1913 

NVIDIA 1229 

REAL 3D 1821 

REALITY FUSION, INC. 1657 

REM INFOGRAFICA 2042 

RENDITION 1629 

STACCATO SYSTEMS 1061 



TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. 
VR-1.INC. 

3D CONTENT PROVIDER 

3NAME3D 



1529 
937 



1248 



TESTING AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT SERVICES 

ABSOLUTE QUALITY 836 



MOTION CAPTURE MANUFACTURING 

ASCENSION TECHNOLOGY CORP. 

DISTRIBUTOR 

ENGAGE GAMES ONLINE 

MFG/DESIGNER OF PACKAGING 

INFORMATION PACKAGING CORP. 

MOTION CAPTURE 

POLHEMUS, INC. 

STOCK 3D MODELS 

REM INFOGRAFICA 

CREATIVE SERVICES 

SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 

SOUND EFFECTS AND MUSIC 

SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 

CUSTOM DESIGN/COIN-OP PRODUCTS 

STREAK TECHNOLOGY 

DEVELOP 2D/3D CHIPS 

TRITECH MICROELECTRONICS, INC. 

TRAINING FOR 3D ANIMATION 

VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC/THE LAB 

SERVICE COMPANY 

WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA 



1156 



1129 



1853 



1443 



2042 



1849 



1939 



1259 



1149 



2038 



1859 



SERVICES 



GRAPHICS SERVICES 

ANIMATEK INTERNATIONAL 

ELSA INC. 

VECTOR GRAPHICS 

VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC/THE LAB 



1754 
1343 
1362 
2038 










CUSTOM 3D MODELING SERVICES 

ANIMATEK INTERNATIONAL 

VECTOR GRAPHICS 

VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC/THE LAB 

MUSIC AND SOUND EFFECTS 

DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 
SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 
STACCATO SYSTEMS 

MOTION CAPTURE SERVICES 

MOTION ANALYSIS CORP. 

PEAK PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGIES 

POLHEMUS, INC. 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT 

ABSOLUTE QUALITY 

ADVERTISING NETWORK 

ENGAGE GAMES ONLINE 

INSTALLATION SOFTWARE 

INSTALLSHIELD SOFTWARE CORP. 

DESIGN, PROTOTYPING AND MNFG 

STREAK TECHNOLOGY 

TRAINING FOR 3D ANIMATION 

VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC/THE LAB 





AUDIO/MIDI BOARDS 




1754 


AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR 


1620 


1362 


CHROMATIC RESEARCH 


1721 


2038 








AUDIO RECORDING/ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT 




CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


1921 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


1939 






1061 


GRAPHICS ACCELERATOR CHIPS/BOARDS 






3DFX INTERACTIVE 


1111 




ACCELGRAPHICS, INC. 


1943 


1161 


CHROMATIC RESEARCH 


1721 


1253 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


1443 


ELSA INC. 


1343 




INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 


1913 




NVIDIA 


1229 


836 


QUANTUM 3D 


1702 




REAL 3D 


1821 




RENDITION 


1629 


1129 


STELLAR SEMICONDUCTORS, INC. 


1663 


TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. 


1529 




TRITECH MICROELECTRONICS, INC. 


1149 


1941 


VIDEO CAPTURE/PLAYBACK 






CHROMATIC RESEARCH 


1721 




CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


1259 


NEWTEK 


1929 




RENDITION 


1629 




TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. 


1529 



2038 



VIDEO/FILM POST-PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT 



SCRIPTWRITERS 




CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


WRITER'S GUILD OF AMERICA 


1859 


INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 


1913 


nnnnnnTO 




NEWTEK 

COMRESSION/DECOMPRESSION 

INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 


1929 


PKl] ults 






1 IIUUUUIII 

HARDWARE 




1913 


PC 




TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. 


1529 


AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR 


1620 






CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 
QUANTUM 3D 


1760 
1702 


STORAGE DEVICES (OPTICAL, HARD/TAPE) 

CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


MOTION CAPTURE 




MONITORS 




ASCENSION TECHNOLOGY CORP. 


1156 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 


1913 


PEAK PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGIES 


1253 


REAL 3D 


1821 


POLHEMUS, INC. 


1443 






PROFESSIONAL WORKSTATIONS 




SCANNERS 

CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


MINOLTA CORP. 


830 


INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 


1913 








PRINTERS 




QUANTUM 3D 


1702 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


RAINDROP GEOMAGIC, INC. 


1153 






REM INFOGRAFICA 


2042 


PERIPHERALS 




SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


ACT LABS 


1659 


VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 


1756 


VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC/THE LAB 


2038 


AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR 


1620 






ELSA INC. 


1343 






GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON TECHNOLOGY GROUP 


1648 


DRAW/PAINT TOOLS 




INTERACT ACCESSORIES, INC. 


1249 


NEWTEK 


1929 


LOGITECH 


1837 






QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


AUTHORING TOOLS 




SAITEK INDUSTRIES LTD. 


1861 


DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


THRUSTM ASTER, INC. 


1752 


KINETIX 


1813 






THE MOTION FACTORY 


1621 


VIDEO PRODUCTION SYSTEM 




QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


NEWTEK 


1929 


STACCATO SYSTEMS 


1061 






VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 


1756 


3D VIEWING 

INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 


1913 


IMAGE MANIPULATION/PHOTO ENHANCEMENT 






NEWTEK 


1929 


3D SCANNERS 








MINOLTA CORP. 


830 


VIDEO EDITING 








NEWTEK 


1929 


3D DIGITIZERS 








MINOLTA CORP. 


830 


MOTION CAPTURE 








MOTION ANALYSIS CORP. 


1161 


CPU UPGRADES 




PEAK PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGIES 


1253 


CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY 


1760 


SOUND EDITING 




PC PLATFORM 




DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 


1921 


AMD 


1429 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 


SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


_ SOFTWARE — 


— — 


STACCATO SYSTEMS 


1061 


ANIMATION 




INTERNET TOOLS 








KESMAI CORPORATION 


1129 


ANIMATEK INTERNATIONAL 


1754 






CALIGARI CORPORATION 


1548 


QSOUND LABS, INC. 


814 






SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


KINETIX 


1813 










VR-1.INC. 


937 


THE MOTION FACTORY 


1621 






NEWTEK 

REM INFOGRAFICA 


1929 
2042 


INTERNET SERVERS/BROWSERS 




SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


KESMAI CORPORATION 


1129 


VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC/THE LAB 


2038 


SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


2D/3D RENDERING/MODELING 




PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 




3NAME30 


1248 


METROWERKS 


1448 


ANIMATEK INTERNATIONAL 


1754 






CALIGARI CORPORATION 


1548 






KINETIX 


1813 






NEWTEK 


1929 











APIS/GAME ENGINES 




PROGRAMMING UTILITIES 




ACT LABS 


1659 


ACT LABS 


1659 


AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR 


1620 


RAD GAME TOOLS 


1437 


ENGAGE GAMES ONLINE 


1129 


SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


THE MOTION FACTORY 


1621 






QSOUND LABS, INC. 
RAD GAME TOOLS 
REALITY FUSION, INC. 
RENDITION 


814 

1437 
1657 
1629 


INSTALLATION TOOLS 

ACT LABS 

INSTALLSHIELD SOFTWARE CORP. 


1659 
1941 


SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 
STACCATO SYSTEMS 
VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 


2135 
1061 
1756 


ASSET MANAGEMENT 

SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


VR-1, INC. 


937 







CROSS-PLATFORM DEVELOPMENT/PORTING TOOLS 

METROWERKS 1448 

STACCATO SYSTEMS 1061 

VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 1756 

STOCK AUDIO/ART 



AUDIO RECORDING/EDITING 

DOLBY LABORATORIES LICENSING CORP. 
SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 
STACCATO SYSTEMS 

PRODUCTION UTILITIES 

SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 
VISION SCAPE IMAGING INC/THE LAB 



REM INFOGRAFICA 


2042 




SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


1849 


PROJECT MANAGEMENT 


OBJECT-ORIENTED TOOLS 

METROWERKS 


1448 


METROWERKS 
SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 


MOTION ANALYSIS CORP. 


1161 


AUDIO 

AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR 
QSOUND LABS, INC. 


SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 
VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 


2135 
1756 


PROTOTYPING TOOLS 

SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 
VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED CORP. 


2135 
1756 


RAD GAME TOOLS 
SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 
SOUND IDEAS/IMAGE IDEAS 
STACCATO SYSTEMS 


CLIENT/SERVER TOOLS 






SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 




VR-1, INC. 


937 




TESTING & DEBUGGING TOOLS 






METROWERKS 


1448 




VIDEO UTILITIES & ENGINES 






RAD GAME TOOLS 


1437 




REALITY FUSION, INC. 


1657 




CODE EDITORS 






SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 




STACCATO SYSTEMS 


1061 





1921 
1849 
1061 



2135 
2038 



1448 
1849 



1620 
814 
1437 
1849 
1939 
1061 



FORCE FEEDBACK TOOLSET 

ACT LABS 



1659 



COMPUTER G 



AME DEVELOP 





BOOTH INDEX 



3D LABS 915 

3DFX INTERACTIVE 1111 

3DO JOB FAIR 409 

3NAME3D 1248 

ABSOLUTE QUALITY 836 

ACADEMY OF INTERACTIVE ARTS AND SCIENCES 1162 

ACCELGRAPHICS 1943 

ACCOLADE JOB FAIR 416 

ACT LABS 1659 

ACTIONWORLD JOB FAIR 314 

ACTIVISION JOB FAIR 313 

ADOBE SYSTEMS 1258 

ALIAS|WAVEFRONT 1537 

ALLIANCE SEMICONDUCTOR 1863 

AMD 1429 

ANALOG DEVICES 1649 

ANGEL STUDIOS JOB FAIR 304 

ANIMATEK INTERNATIONAL 1754 

ANIMATION MAGAZINE 2139 

ARTBEATS 834 

ASCENSION TECHNOLOGY 1156 

ATARI GAMES JOB FAIR 410 

ATI RESEARCH JOB FAIR 405 

ATI TECHNOLOGIES 1329 

AUREAL SEMICONDUCTOR 1620 



BANJO SOFTWARE 

BIOVISION 

BLIZZARD ENTERTAINMENT 

BOSTON ACOUSTICS 

BRIDGEPORT TECHNICAL SERVICES 



C 



CADCRAFTS 

CALIGARI CORPORATION 

CAPCOM DIGITAL STUDIOS 

CGDA 

CH PRODUCTS 

CHROMATIC RESEARCH 

CIRRUS LOGIC 

COMPUTER GRAPHICS WORLD 

CREATIVE LABS 

CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES 



DARWIN 3D 

DAVIDSON & ASSOCIATES 



D 



JOB FAIR 302 
1935 

JOB FAIR 402 
1755 

JOB FAIR 509 



1758 
1548 
JOB FAIR 315 
1300 
1356 
1721 
1029 
2143 
949 
1760 



1157 
JOB FAIR 404 



DIAMOND MULTIMEDIA 

DISC MAKERS 

DOLBY LABS LICENSING CORPORATION 

DOODAH MARKETING 

DUCK CORP. 

DWANGO (IVS CORP.) 



ELSAINC. 

ENGAGE GAMES ONLINE 
ENGINEERING ANIMATION 
ESS TECHNOLOGY, INC. 



1513 
1252 
1921 
1057 
818 
2029 



1343 

1129 

JOB FAIR 408 

1348 



6 



H 



FUJITSU MICROELECTRONICS 



GAMESPY/CRITICAL MASS 

GELARDI DESIGN 

GRAVIS OF KENSINGTON TECH 

GT INTERACTIVE 



HAPP CONTROLS 
HASBRO INTERACTIVE 
HASH INC. 
HOUSE OF MOVES 



IMMERSION CORPORATION 

INFORMATION PACKAGING CORPORATION 

INSTALLSHIELD CORPORATION 

INTEL 

INTERACT ACCESSORIES 

INTERGRAPH COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

IONOS/MEDIATECHNICS 

ITU RESEARCH 



1352 



1563 

2133 

1648 

JOB FAIR 300 



1349 

JOB FAIR 305 

1857 

1255 






JON PEDDIE ASSOCIATES 



KESMAI 
KINETIX 



J 



K 



1137 
1853 
1941 
1637 
1249 
1913 
1860 
1256 



1 260 



1129 
1813 







1 H 




SCIENTIFIC PLACEMENT 
SCITECH SOFTWARE 




1855 




L 




2141 


UGHTSCAPE TECHNOLOGIES 

LOGITECH 

LOOKING GLASS STUDIOS 


M 


1762 

1837 

JOB FAIR 317 


SEARCH ASSOCIATES 

SEGA OF AMERICA 

SEGASOFT 

SIERRA ON-UNE/YOSEMITEENT. 

SILICON GAMING 




JOB FAIR 501 
1257 
2129 

JOB FAIR 400 


mmmmm^mammm 


M 




JOB FAIR 401 




in 




uiliuu in unmi i m vi 

SOFTIMAGE 




UUU 1 nl l\ 7U 1 

1317 


MADCATZINC. 




1263 


SONY INTERACTIVE STUDIOS AMERICA 


929 


MATROX 




1829 


SONY PLATFORM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 


2135 


MCCARTHY TEAMWORX 




963 


SOUNDELUX MEDIA LABS 




1849 


METROWERKS 




1448 


SOUND IDEAS 




1939 


MGM INTERACTIVE 




JOB FAIR 303 


SPACETEC IMC 




943 


MICROPROSE 




JOB FAIR 407 


SQUARE SOFT 




JOB FAIR 504 


MICROSOFT CORPORATION 




1317 


STACCATO SYSTEMS 




1061 


MILLER FREEMAN, INC. 




1143 


STELLAR SEMICONDUCTOR 




1663 


MINOLTA CORPORATION 




830 


STORMFRONT STUDIOS 




JOB FAIR 503 


MOTION ANALYSIS CORPORATION 




1161 


STREAK TECHNOLOGY 




1259 


MOTION FACTORY 


HI 


1621 
1337 




T 




MULTIGEN INC. 




T m^mm 




TALONSOFT 


■ 




§■■■■^^^■^^■^■■1 


N 




JOB FAIR 403 








TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 




1529 


NATIONAL AMUSEMENT NETWORK 


1305 


THRUSTMASTER 




1752 


NEC ELECTRONICS 




1503 


TIBURON ENTERTAINMENT 




JOB FAIR 412 


NEWTEK, INC 




1929 


TOP DOG SOFTWARE 




JOB FAIR 502 


NICHIMEN GRAPHICS 




1543 


TRITECH MICROELECTRONICS 




1149 


NVIDIA 


D 


1229 


TURBINE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE 


JOB FAIR 414 


PEAK PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGIES 


1253 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 




1362 


POLHEMUS INCORPORATED 




1443 


VERITEST 




2040 


PREMIER SEARCH 


n 


JOB FAIR 516 


VICON MOTION SYSTEMS 
VIEWPOINT DATA LABS 
VIRTOOLS 




1761 
1748 


mmmammmmmm^mm 


U 








M 




1358 


QSOUND LABS 
QUANTUM 3D 




814 


VIRTUALLY UNLIMITED 




1756 


n 


1702 


VIRTUAL SEARCH 

VISION SCAPE IMAGING/THE LAB 

VLSI TECHNOLOGY 

VOXWARE 




JOB FAIR 316 
2038 




R 




814 




■■ 




2034 


RAD GAME TOOLS 




1437 


VR-1 




937 


RAINDROP GEOMAGIC 




1153 
JOB FAIR 413 








RA STUDIOS 








REAL 3D 

REALIMATION, INC. 
REALITY FUSION 
REALTIME ASSOCIATES 
RED STORM ENTERTAINMENT 




1821 
1243 
1657 
JOB FAIR 406 
JOB FAIR 415 
2042 


WALT DISNEY IMAGINEERING 
WESTWOOD STUDIOS 
WRITERS GUILD 


■» 


JOB FAIR 301 

JOB FAIR 411 

1859 






7 




REM INFOGRAFICA 




L 




RENDITION 


O —. 


1629 


ZEN RESEARCH 
ZORAN CORPORATION 
ZYGOTE MEDIA GROUP 




840 
824 




X 








V 




1254 


S3 INC. 




1712 








SAITEK INDUSTRIES 




1861 








SC&T INTERNATIONAL 




1261 











tff t 



An 



Show 




hat s New and 
hat's Next in 
teractive Entertainmen 





Developer Super Session: This session will be a panel style discussion 
attended by some of the world's leading developers focusing on the future 
content of entertainment software from a creative perspective. Issues to be 
covered include: the emergence of new platforms; the convergence of skills 
from other industries; and consumer demand for innovation and higher quality. 

CEO Keynote Panel: Leading executives will address the latest trends 
in the business from PC and console entertainment to Internet and game 
development issues. 

Workshops! On Wednesday, May 27-a full-day of nine three-hour 
intensive workshops. 



S^l! 







EXT 



A Stellar Conference Program 

Learn About the Interactive Business of 
Tomorrow through Seven Tracks Devoted to: 

• Business Opportunities and Trends 
•Technology Advances 

• Game Developers sponsored by ^j^JJjI^ 

Entertainment on the 
Internet/On-line Gaming 



An Exhibit Floor pulsating with excitem 
featuring the latest interactive softwar 
products fueling a multi-billion dollar indust 



•Successful Marketing Strategies 
Financing New Media sponsored by &Lybrand 



Workshops: May 27, 1998 
Conference: May 28-29, 1996 
Exhibits: May 2&-30, 1998 

Georgia World Congress Center 
Atlanta, GA 

E 3 is a trade event. 

No one under 18 allowed. 



• j Interactive 

Digital 
c g Software 



Media Sponsors: iaVHI^^^^^I^ 

CTW IEIMEDIA 



WEEK" *IDG 

WORLD EXPO 



REGISTER! 



Call: 800.315.1133 
Web: www.e3expo.com 
Fax: 781.440.0357 

SAVINGS UNTIL APRIL 24TH 







CONFERENCE ■ AT ■ A ■ GUNGE 



Room 



9:30am -11:OOam 



11:30am 12:30pm 



2:00pm - 3:30pm 



4:00pm - 5:00pm 





104 C 

Convention Center 


1100 Keynote 

The Game Within the Game 

Jim Whims 




<3 


202 A 

Convention Center 


1201 1301 1401 

Leveraging Real-Time 3D in Your Raising Capital for Your Next The Shape ot '98 and 
Marketing Plan Project: Unique Funding Vehicles Beyond 
omd Rahmat for Game Development, Platform Ann Stephens 
Ports & Distribution 

Jesse Allread, David Beyer, Erik Ott 


§ 


202 B 

Convention Center 


1202 1302 Plenary 1402 

Distribution Options for Today's Distribution Standards for the How Do You Dring a Game 
Market Game Industry Property to a Mass 

Tom Frisina Michael Maas, Laura Meile, Market Audience Online? 

Susan Lee-Merrow Allen Cunningham 




202 C 

Convention Center 


1203 1303 1403 

Marketing And Building Strategic Online Gaming Marketing Working with Developers 
Alliances in Cyberspace Strategies Keiiy Fiock 

Charles Austin Jeff Dwight & Panelists 



Room 



Seaview 

Hyatt 



10:30am - 6:30pm 



Managing Game Development Conference: The Software Game 

McCarthy TeamworX 



Room 



10:00am - 6:00pm 



GO 


101 A 

Convention Center 


^03™ 

3D Studio Max R2 

Mark Williamson 


102 A 

Convention Center 


105 

Softimage Game Development Tools & Techniques 

Daniel Beaudry, Alexandre Jean Claude, Pierre Tousignant 




104 A 

Convention Center 


101 

Advanced OpenGL Game Development 

Michael Gold, Mark Kilgard, Richard S. Wright, Jr. 


104 B 

Convention Center 


102 

Creating Games with Java 

Larry O'Brien 



f HI 








Room 



104 c 

Convention Center 



9:30am -11:00am 



11:30am- 12:30pm 



2:00pm - 3:30pm 



4:00pm - 5:00pm 



2400 Keynote 

Beyond The Hard-core Gamer 

Doug Glen 



202 A 

Convention Center 



GO 



2101 

Increasing Your Company's 
Revenue: Will It Come from 
Retail, E Commerce, or 
Alternative Distribution 
Channels? 

Jesse Allread, David Cole, Eli Erhman, 
John Taylor 



2201 

Harness the Internet To Sell 
More Barnes 

Brian Jamison 



2301 

Going Global in the Games 



Dianne Drosnes, Derek McLeish, 
Alison Richards 



202 B 

Convention Center 



2102 

Market Research Boot Camp 

Solange Van Der Moer 



2202 2302 

How Game Spin-Off Novelization OEM & Bundling Strategies 

DealS Work Jill Goldworn, Matt Toschlog, 

Ashley Grayson & Panelists Ken Wirt, Philip Wrigh 



202 C 

Convention Center 



2103 

Licensing In 



2203 

Educating 1 



Reilly Brennan, Germaine Gioza, Jeff Tschiltsch 

Jim Kennedy, Mark Radcliff 



2303 

Licensing Out 

Paul Baldwin, Reilly Brennan, 
Daniel Kletzky, Danny Simon 



Convention Center 



204 



Managing Innovation in Product 
Development Projects 



John Fowler 






Room 



%! 



Seaview 

Hyatt 



10:30am - 6:30pm 



Managing Game Development Conference: The Software Game 

McCarthy TeamworX 



Room 



GO 



Beacon B 

Hyatt 



9:30am - 5:00pm 



Analyst Briefing 

David Cole, Robert Fagin, Rob Glidden, Jon Peddie, Omid Rahmat, Ed Roth, Ann Stephens, Bill Zinsmeister 






Room 



10:00am - 6:00pm 



M 



Convention Center 



3D Studio Max R2 

Mark Williamson 



Convention Center 



206 



Game Development in C++ 



Paul Pednana 



102 A 

Convention Center 



105 



Softimage Game Development Tools & Techniques 

Daniel Beaudry, Alexandre Jean Claude, Pierre Tousignant 



Convention Center 



201 



Programming Games Under Windows 



Matt Pritchard 



103 A 

Convention Center 



CO 



204 

The Art ot Testing Games 

Jeanne Collins, Megan Quattrocchi, Randall Williams 



104 A 

Convention Center 



101 



Advanced OpenGL Game Development 

Michael Gold, Mark Kilgard, Richard S.Wright, Jr. 



104 B 

Convention Center 



102 



Creating Games with Java 

Larry O'Brien 



201 A 

Convention Center 



202 



Writing for an Interactive Age 



1 Sheldon 



2018 

Convention Center 



205 

Idea to Completion: Creating Real-Time 3D Game 

Josh White, Jeff Lander 








111 




Room 



Ballroom A 

Convention Center 




10:00am - 11:00am 



11:30am- 12:30pm 

11:30am -1:00pm 

3222 Plenary O 

Game Developer Magazine's Animation Confrontation 

Refer to conference addendum forjudging panel and participants 



Ballroom B 

Convention Center 



3105(29 

Bringing Your Code Up to 

Ron Fosner 



3205 (2D 

High Color, High Res: Graphics Programming in a Non- 
Palletized World 

Wade Bramerd 



101 A 

Convention Center 



3104 GD (3D 

Implementing an Interactive Music Score 

David O'Neal, Don Veca 



3223 GD 

DirectMusic & Downloadable Sounds: Finally, Complete 
Control Over Your Sound Design! 

Todor Fay, David Javelosa, John Miles, Nick Skrepetos, David 
Sparks, David Taylor, Tom White 



101 B 

Convention Center 



3106 (2d (3D 

How Bout Oem Bones: Creating a Bones 
Animation System 

Andrew Lunstad 



3208 (3D 

Education with a Capital "E" 

Lourdes FJouras, Ha Phan, Alma Torres 



CO 



102 A 

Convention Center 



3101 GD GD 

The Game Biz: Getting in the Right Way 

Greg Zeschuk 



3224 C3 

How to Break in as an Artist 

Carrie Galbraith 



CO 
CO 



102 B/C 



Convention Center 



3102 GB 

Legal Tools For Protecting The Sale, Promotion i 
Multiplayer Ose of Games on the Internet 

Charles Kramer 



3206(29 

The Physics of Baseball 3D 

Miguel Gomez 



103 A 

Convention Center 



3119(33 

Getting an Educational Bang From Your Killer Game 
Engines 

Jon Blossom, Margo Nanny 



3202 GO 

Playing Games with Washington: Government Report 
98 

Daniel Greenberg 



104 A 

Convention Center 



3121 <2D 

Engine Scalability and 3D Hardware 

Charlie Brown, Gary McTaggart 



3203 GO 

When Teams Work, When Teams 

Don Daglow 



104 B 

Convention Center 



3107 (3D 

Designing Games for Broad Audiences: 
Game Shows Online 

Robert Tercek 



3201 GD 

Forming Your Own Company: The I 

Clay Dreslough 



104 C 

Convention Center 



3108 (3DGD 3207 (3D 

Design Docs: What's the Use? Entrain 

Alex Dunne, John L. Jack, Todd Porter, Steve Schrek Brian Monarty 






Regency A 

Hyatt 



3103 VAC© 

Planning and Directing Motion Capture for Games 

Melianthe Kines 



3204 GD (3D 

Musical Computers 

Josh Gabriel, Gary Levenberg, Mark Miller 



Terrace Theater 

Convention Center 



GD AUDIO 



gb BUSINESS & LEGAL 



(3D GAME DESIGN 









I- 

* 3305 QD 

Messiah: What You May or May Not Believe 

Michael "Saxs" Perrson, David Perry 



2:00pm - 3:00pm 



3:30pm - 4:30pm 



5:00pm - 0:00pm 



3425 Keynote 

The Genesis of PaRappa The Rapper 

Masaya Matsuura 



3307 (3D 

Do Online Games Still Suck? 

Dani Bunten Berry 



3405 OS (3D 

Project Al 

Mark Baldwin 



3302 GD OB 

Marketing Vs. Development: The Internal Battle 

Joshua Gordon, Ed Zobrist 



3408 (3D Q* 

Designing Games tor the Casino Industry 

Andrew Mound 



3304 GD GD 

Making Interactive Music Work: Gex II 

Jim Hedges 



3404 QD 

Illusions with Audio and Audio Storytelling: A 
Producers and Game Developers Guide to Better and 
More Efficient Soundtracks 

Scott Martin Gershm 



3306 QD 

How Shadows of the Empire Dsed the Force 

Gary Brubaker 



3406(23 

"A Formula Is Worth a Thousand Keyframes" 
Mathematically Derived Real-Time Character Animation 

Peter Akemann 



3323 (3D 

The Jack Principles: 

Change the Way You Think About Interactive 

David Nathanielsz, Jamie Vann 



3401 G3B 

Profiling the Gamer: Sizing the US Household Computer 
Game Marke 

Dale Strang 



3424 (3D 

S/w and H7W Compatibility Testing 

Mark Border, Jeanne Collins, Jeff Loney, Megan Quattrocchi, 
Rodrigo Silveira 



3301 GB 



sgptft*** 



m 



Game Developer 



3407 (2D CZ3 

Creating Realistic Effects with OpenGL 



Simon Hui 



3325 CZ3 (2D 

The Art of Low-Poly 

Paul Steed 



3421 GO 

We Have a Great Idea and No Money: How to Craft a 
Business Plan for Game Development 

Todd Porter, Bob Wright 



3308 QD 

The Interface is the Game 

William Volk 



3402 CZ3 

3D Character Modeling for Animation 

Stefan Henry-Biskup 



3303 GD CZ3 

FMV in Computer Games Suck! 
Or Do We Just Suck At FMV? 

Mark Day 



3423 GD 

The Secret World of Coin-Op Product Development 

Mark Pierce 



3500 Keynote 

Legends of Game Design 

Richard Garriott, Ron Gilbert, Sid Meier, David Perry, 
Johnny Wilson 



PROGRAMMING 



PRODUCTION 



CZ3 VISUAL ARTS 




Room 



10:00am -11:00am 



11:30am -12:30pm 



m 



201 A 

Convention Center 



3150 (39 

Optimizing 3D Performance with Direct3D 

Nvidia 



* 3260 (39 

Low Cost 3D Graphics for Independent Game Developers 



Caligari 



201 B 

Convention Center 



3155(39 

PowerVR II Technology Overview 

PowerVR 



3255 (39 

lips & Tricks of PowerVR's First & Second Generation 

PowerVR 



202 A 

Convention Center 



£2 



3154 GD 

Interactive Audio and "virtual Foley" Sound Effects Osing Physically 
Modeled Algorithms 

Stacatto Systems 



3253 (3D 

How to Implement Force-Feedback IntoYour Game 

Microsoft 



202 B 

Convention Center 



3152 (39 

Gaming and Multimedia Graphics on Windows CE: A Case Study 

ATI Technologies 



5551 (39 

Efficient System Memory Texturing Architecture for Games 

S3 Incorporated 



202 C 

Convention Center 



3153 (39 

Maximizing Real-Time Game Performance 

Interactive Visual Systems 



203 A 

Convention Center 



10:00am - 12:00pm 



3151 CZ3 

Killer Games with S0FTIMAGEI3D 

Softimage 



5251 G3D 

Computer Gaming World's Game Index 

3Dfx Interactive 



M 



■* 



Beacon Rotunda 

Hyatt 



3109GC9CZ3 

Torching Fahrenheit 

John Gwinner 



' 3218CZ3 (39 

Programmers Vs Artists 

Chris Fregien, Lane Roathe 



Harbor B/C 

Hyatt 



3122 CZ3 

Art Tools: RT3D Modeling Discussion 

Lisa Washburn 



3217(39 

Why Do Most Games Suck? Getting Quality Into the Box 

John Rae-Grant 



Pacific 

Hyatt 



3120 CZ3 (39 

The Marriage of Art and Code 

Talin 



3215 (3D (3D 

Fascist Game Design 

Anthony Farmer 



Regency C 

Hyatt 



3115 (3D (39 

FX vs Game Content: 

When is Great Technology Not Enough 

James Daniel 



3212 (3D 

Designing for Community: 

How to Cope with the Problem Children of the Online World 



DaveWeinstein 



Regency D 

Hyatt 



3116 (3D 

Managing Game Development: 

Best Practices, from Concept to Production 

Forrest Workman 



S3 



3213 (3D 

Hey, What's Your Story? Creating a Richer World for Gameplay 

Larry Tuch 






Hyatt 



3117 QD (39 

State of the Art in Authoring Systems 



amie Siqlar 



3214 (3D GIB 

Whither (or Wither) 

Mark Baldwin 



Regency F 

Hyatt 



3118CZ3 

Special FX for Real-Time 3D Games 

Greg Hammond 



3216 (3D 

DVD-ROM Production 

Mark Day 



Seaview A 

Hyatt 



3110 QD (39 

Programmers and Sound Designers: 
Why Can't We All Just Get Along? 

Brian Schmidt 



3219 (39 (3D 

Artificial Intelligence in Computer Games 

Neil Kirby 



Seaview B 

Hyatt 



3111 G3D (3D 

Making Money, Making Software 

Ken Goldstein 



3220 (39 (3D 

Artificial Intelligence in Computer Games 

Eric Dybsand 






Seaview C 

Hyatt 



3112 G3B (39 

The 3D Accelerator Market: A Primer 

Chris Donahue 



3209 (39 (3D 

Artificial Intelligence in Computer Games 

Steve Woodcock 



Hyatt 



3113 (3D 

Premises in Story Games 

Hal Barwood 



3210 GD (39 

Designing Games to Ose 3D Audio 

Brian Schmidt 






Hyatt 



3114 (3D (39 

The Console RPG Aftermath 

Gabriel Valencia 



3211 GJB (3D 

Getting into the Game Industry 

Darren Reid 





2:00pm - 3:00pm 


3:30pm - 4:30pm 






3350 GD 

OirectMusic 

Vlicrosoft 


, 3450GeT" 

DirectShow 

Microsoft 




3355(29 

Display List Rendering 

PowerVR 


3455 OD 

Vector Quantization Texture Compression, Hardware Rump Mapping, and 
Generalized Modifier Volumes 

PowerVR 




3354 (23 GD 

Pevelopment Tools: Shines & Whines 

Metrowerks 


3453 QD 

What is the Future of Interactive Multichannel Audio on DVD-ROM? 

Dolby Laboratories 




3352 G© (39 

[he Art ol Force Feedback: Adding Realism To Your Applications Using Force 
Feedback Sticks, Wheels, and Mice 

mmersion 


3451 G0 

l/R-1 Conductor: Creating a Standard Technology Platform for Online Gaming 

VR-1 


3360 GD 

Environmental Audio 

Creative Labs 


3452(33 GI3 

Creating Titles for the ArcadePC 

Quantum3D 




2:00pm - 4:00pm 








3351 CZ3 

Killer Games with S0FTIMAGEI3D 

Softimage 



^^^319(23' 

Q&A Ruundtable: Optimizing for Pentium II Processor Platforms 

Mehmet Adalier, Peter Baker, Haim Barad, Micheal Julier, 
Kim Pallister, Jay Sturges 


"3422GSC73 

Scalable Geometry 

John Talley 


3324 CZ3 

Art Tool Showdown! 

Terri Hannon 


3428 CZ3 

Game Art Styles: The Discussion 

Lynell Jinks 


3318CZ3 

Contract Artist vs. In-House Artist 

Dale Homburg, Jimmie Homburg 


3411 GB 

Online Games: Niche or Mass Market? 

How Are Consumers "Paying" and Entertainment Providers Profiting? 

Rick Denny 


3315(33 

Designing Multiplayer Console Games 

Steve Taylor 


3416Q9GB 

The Relationship with the Publisher....or How to Handle the Master Without 
Becoming the Slave 

Joe Minton 


3316GE) 

Teamwork in Multiplayer Games: Adapting Old Gameplay to a New Medium 

Hamilton Chu 


3417 G© 

Q&A Roundtable: Optimizing for Pentium II Processor Platforms 

Mehmet Adalier, Peter Baker, Haim Barad, Micheal Julier, 
Kim Pallister, Jay Sturges 


3317GB 

Herding Cats: The Art of Managing Development Teams 

Harald Seeley 


3409 G© GD 

Game Development Osing Alternative Languages 

Kory Bricker 


3309 G© 

Simulating Human Opponents in Action Games 

John Grigsby 


3426(39 

We Have No Lives: RPGs, Players, and the Future 

Tom Hall, Warren Spector 


3310 GD G© 

Tips and Techniques for Effective Sound Design 

James Ackley 


3410GB 

Rabes in Royland; Exploding Myths About Women in the Game Industry 

Melissa Farmer 


3311 GB GD 

Dream Jobs and Nightmares: Working Environments in the Games Industry 

David Roberts 


3412(39 

Design vs. Technology: How Will Technology Licensing Affect Development 

Mike Wilson 


3312(39 

Problems of Puzzle Game Design 

Alexey Pajitnov 


3413 (39 GB 

Secrets of Successful Gaming Communities 

Amy Jo Kim 


3313(39 

The Future of Strategy Games 

Phil Steinmeyer 


3414(39 

Multiple Intelligences and Killer Games Collide 

Margo Nanny 


3314(39 

Viva Variety! 

Mike Stemmlee 


3415 (39 GB 

How Can You Compete Against the World Wide Web? 

Attracting and Keeping Those Darn Customers for Your Online Game 

Eric Goldberg 



1115 






Room 



Ballroom A 

Convention Center 



10:00am- 11:00am 

4107 (3D GD 

Putting the Ghost in the Machine 

Ernest Adams 



11:30am- 12:30pm 

4205 GD 

Quake II: A Study in Using OpenGL and Hardware 
Acceleration for the PC Platform 

Brian Hook 



Ballroom B 

Convention Center 



4105 GD GB 

3B Controllers One Year Later: What Have Learned? 
What Have We Earned? 

Tom Cmajdalka, Jay Eishenlohr, Frank Evers, Jon Peddie, 
Scott Sellers 



101 A 

Convention Center 



4120 €23 

Building light Real Time Models 

Ocean Quigley 



4206 GD (3D 

Natural Language Processing In 55 Minutes or Less 

John O'Neil 



101 B 

Convention Center 



4106 GD (3D 

Making the Play: Team Cooperation in Microsoft 
Baseball 3D 

Steve Rabin 



4219 (3D (3D 

Selecting Content for Location-Based Entertainment 
Centers 

Jon Snoddy 



CO 



102 A 

Convention Center 



4104 GD 

"Holy Foley, Batman!" 

Hamilton Altstatt 



4217 GD 

Testing: Internal vs. External 

David Maxey, Harold Ryan, Pete Schneider, Rodrigo Silveira, 
Rawson Stovall 



CO 

CO 



102 B/C 

Convention Center 



4119 (2D 

Cross Platform Development: Easier and Harder Than 
You Think 

Eric Klein 



4207 (3D 

Games for the Best of Us: Puzzles, Board Games and 
Game Shows 

Scott Kim 



103 A 

Convention Center 



4100 

Games and Children: Just Fun and Fantasy? 

Jeanne Funk, Hal Josephson, Debra Lieberman, 
Eugene Provenzo 



4200 

The Impact of Games on Children 

Refer to Conference Addendum for panelists 



104 A 

Convention Center 



4101QD 4202 €23 

Starting, Financing and Operating a Game Development picture Imperfect: Common 3D Bendering Flaws 
House: A Study From All Angles Brad cain 

Jim Charne, Philip Cross, Jonathan Funk, Pat Garvey, Jason 
Hall, Rachel McCallister, Mark Stevens 



104 B 

Convention Center 



4108 (3D 

Designing for Online Spectating 

Leonard C. Quam 



4203 GD G3B 

A Guide to Successful Developer/Publisher 



Dan Scherlis 



104 C 

Convention Center 



4103 GD €23 

Bapid Prototyping: Cheap Ways to visualize : 

Nicole Lazzaro 



4201 G3B 

Negotiating a Great Game Development Deal 



Dean Gloster 



Begency A 

Hyatt 



4102 GB 

Coin-Operated Games: What's in it for You? 

Elaine Ditton 



4204 GD 

Improving the Standard of PC Audio 

Mark Nadeski 



JL 



gd AUDIO 



GB BUSINESS & LEGAL 



(3D GAME 











2:00pm - 3:00pm 






4301 GB 

What Game Publishers Really Want 

Kelly Flock, Mitch Lasky, Jim Perkins, Barbara Walter 



3:30pm - 4:30pm 



4405 GO 

High Performance Game Programming in C++ 

Paul Pednana 



5:00pm - 6:00pm 



4504 Keynote GO 

Blazing Fast Code 

Jon Bentley 



4306 GO GO 

Next Generation Effects Using Multi-Texture, 
Multi-Pass Triangles 

David Kirk 



4402 CO GO 

The Making of Blade Runner, Soup to Nuts! 

Louis Castle 



4505 GO 

The Design Philosphy Behind Total Annihlation 

Chris Taylor 



4305 GO GO 

Building Commercial Games in Java: How We Did It 

Garner Halloran 



4403 GD GO 

Advanced Audio Technology for the PC: Theory and 
Practice 

Jeffrey Barish, David O'Neal 



4503 CO GO 

Artistic License: Acquiring, Managing and Dealing 
with Licenses 

Elizabeth Braswell 



4300 

Got Anything For Girls? 

Cecilia Barajas, Annie Fox, Yasmin Kafai, 
Kaveri Subrahmayam, Alex Utterman 



4400 4500 

Arrested Development: Can Digital Entertainment Grow Images of Women on the Screen 

Dp? ShOUld It? Bonnie Campbell, Astrid Heger 
Sonny Fox, JC Herz 



4302 CZ3 

Art Skills to Produce Superior Figurative Game Art 

Don Seegmiller 



4418 CZ3 CO 

$9B 




4522 GD 

A Review of DirectMusic 

Keith Weiner 



4318 GO 

The Future of Coin-Op Games 

John Fowler, John Latta, Tom Petit, Matt Saettler, Albert Teng, 
Jeff Walker 



4406 GD 

Abstract Design Tools: Chapter 2 

Doug Church 



4507 GO 

Are Adventure Games Dead? 

Steve Meretzky 



4319 GO GO 

Challenges of Technology and Design in Massively 
Multiplayer Online Games 

Rusel DeMaria, Dan Scherlis, Mike Sellers, John Smedley, 
Rich Vogel 



4317 Keynote GD 

Control Your Destiny: 



the Game First in 



Paul Sams 



4404 GO GO 

Hardcore Al for the Computer Games of Tomorrow 

John Funge 



4525 GO GO 

Barbie Cool Looks Fashion Designer: 
A Case Study 

Andy Rifkin 



4307 GO 

Silicon Hollywood: A 

Noah Falstein 



4407GOCZ3 4517 GB 

Database Development for Real-Time 3D Games: A view The Future of Multiplayer Online Gaming 

From DOth Sides Dean Frost, Gary Griffiths, Eric Hachenburg, 

Gjon Camaj Bob Huntley, Paul Matteuchi, John Taylor 



4303 GO 

12 New Rules of Thumb for Shipping Great Software 

Jim McCarthy 



4401 GB 

Look Before You Leap: Lessons from the Rise and I 
of Roffo Games 

Michael Dornbrook 



4502 GB 

Who's Killing Online Gaming? 

Leonard C. Quam 



4304 GD CO 

Game Music Demo Marathon 

George Sanger 



4419GB GO 

Developing for DirectArcade 

Matt Saettler 



4506 GO 

Creating Character Across Media 

Christy Marx 



GO PROGRAMMING 



PR0D0CTI0N 



CZ3 VISUAL ARTS 



r 



AME DEVELOP 







Room 




10:00am- 11:00am 


11:30am - 12:30pm 


SESSIONS 


201 A 

Convention Center 


*4150 GD 

Multiresolution Meshes: A Solution for Creating 
Scalable 3D Games 

Intel 


"4250 Gs""" "*^ 

Programming for PC-based Coin-Op and Arcade Games 

Intel 


202 B 

Convention Center 


4152 GJB 

Making Your Games Available to the Over 1 Million 
Members of the Internet Gaming Zone 

Microsoft 


4251 GD 

Programming with Glide 

3Dfx Interactive 


go 
s 


202 C 

Convention Center 


4153 GD 

Giving Gamers Aural Satisfaction 

Aureal Semiconductor 


4252 (3D GD 

Creating Titles for the ArcadePC 

Quantum3D 


CO 


203 A 

Convention Center 




10:00am - 12:00pm 




4151 CZ3 

Killer Games with S0FTIMAGEI3D 

Softimage 








go 

UUI 

a 


Beacon Rotunda 

Hyatt 


Managing Game Development: 

Best Practices, from Concept to Production 

Forrest Workman 


Herding Cats: The Art of Managing Development Teams 

Harald Seeley 


Pacific 

Hyatt 


4208 QD GD 

lips and Techniques for Effective Sound Design 

James Ackley 


Regency C 

Hyatt 


4116 CZ3 

Special FX for Real-Time 3D Games 

Greg Hammond 


4215 GD GD 

Game Development Dsing Alternative Languages 

Kory Bricker 


Regency 

Hyatt 


4117 GD 

Q&A Roundtable: 

Optimizing for Pentium II Processor Platforms 

MehmetAdalier, Peter Baker, Haim Barad.Micheal Julier, 
Kim Pallister, Jay Sturges 


4216 GD 

Simulating Human Opponents in Action Games 


Regency E 

Hyatt 


4118 CZ3 GD 

The Marriage of Art and Code 

Talin 


4218 (3D 

We Have No Lives: RPGs, Players, and the Future 

Warren Spector, Tom Hall 


Regency F 

Hyatt 


4114 GD 

Why Do Most Games Suck? Getting Quality Into the Box 

John Rae-Grant 


4220 CZ3 

Game Art Styles: The Discussion 

Lynell Jinks 




SeaviewA 

Hyatt 


4109 GD GD 

Programmers and Sound Designers: 
Why Can't We All Just Get Along? 

Brian Schmidt 


4213 (3D 

Teamwork in Multiplayer Games: 
Adapting Old Gameplay to a New Medium 

Hamilton Chu 


SeaviewB 

Hyatt 


4110 GJB GD 

Dream Jobs and Nightmares: 

Working Environments in the Games Industry 

David Roberts 


4209 GB 

Babes in Boyland; Exploding Myths About Women in the 
Game Industry 

Melissa Farmer 


SeaviewC 

Hyatt 


4111 (3D 

Design vs. Technology: 

How Will Technology Licensing Affect Development 

Mike Wilson 


4210 (3D 

The Future of Strategy Games 

Phil Steinmeyer 


Shoreline A 

Hyatt 


4112 (3D GD 

The Console RPG Aftermath 

Gabriel Valencia 


4211 (3D 

viva Variety! 

Mike Stemmlee 


Shoreline B 

Hyatt 


4113 (3D GD 

Fascist Game Design 

Anthony Farmer 


4212 (3D GJB 

How Can You Compete Against the World Wide Web? 
Attracting and Keeping Those Darn Customers for Your 
Online Game 



- 



2:00pm - 3:00pm 



3:30pm - 4:30pm 



5:00pm - 6:00pm 



1 


" 4350G9 

Performance Tuning for Pentium II Processors with 
l/Tune 3.0 

Intel 


1 4450 (29 

Real-Time Procedural Texturing 

Intel 


'4550(29 

Improving Graphics Performance Using iPEAK 

Intel 


v 


4352 Q9 

Maximizing Real-Time Game Performance 

Interactive Visual Systems 


4451 Q9QJ 

Collecting Money on the Internet: 
Gameplay by the Click 

Digital Eguipment Corporation 


4560 

fast and Furious: Designing Multiplayer Games For 
The Rapidly Accelerating Internet Market 

HEAT Online Gaming Network 


t ■ 


4353 Q9 

Motivate - Intelligent Digital Actor System 

The Motion Factory 


4452 GD 

QMDX: QSound's Free 3D Audio SDK 

QSound Labs 


4552(29 

DirectAnimation 

Microsoft 




2:00pm - 4:00pm 








4351 €Z3 

Killer Games with S0FTIMAGEI3D 

Softimage 



J*"4313GI> 

DVD-ROM Production 

Mark Day 


*4414CZ^™ 

Contract Artist vs. In-House Artist 

Dale Homburg, Jimmie Homburg 


'4514C3 G9 

Programmers Vs Artists 

Chris Fregien, Lane Roathe 






4521 (3D 

Where's the Content? 

Rusel DeMaria 


4308 G3B 

Online Games: Niche or Mass Market? 

How Are Consumers "Paying" and Entertainment 

Providers Profiting? 

Rick Denny 


4415 (29 

Q&A Roundtable: 

Optimizing for Pentium II Processor Platforms 

MehmetAdalier, Peter Baker, Haim Barad, Micheal Julier, 
Kim Pallister, Jay Sturges 


4515(3D 

Computer Role-Playing Games 

Cathryn Mataga 


4309 GJD GD 

Getting into the Game Industry 

Darren Reid 


4416(29CZ3 

Torching Fahrenheit 

John Gwinner 


4516G9CZ3 

Scalable Geometry 

John Talley 


4320 O 

Art Tool Showdown! 

Terri Hannon 


4420 GD 

Voice Over and Localization 

Charles deVries, Bill Black 


4520 CZ3 

Art Tools: RT3D Modeling Discussion 

Lisa Washburn 


4310 (3D 

Premises in Story Games 

Hal Barwood 


4413 (2D (29 

State of the Art in Authoring Systems 

Jamie Siglar 


4513 GD OB 

The Relationship with the Publisher....or How to 
Handle the Master Without Recoming the Slave 
Recoming the Slave 

Joe Minton 


4314 (29 (3D 

Artificial Intelligence in Computer Games 

Neil Kirby 


4408 G3B GD 

Making Money, Making Software 

Ken Goldstein 


4508 GD Q9 

Designing Games to Use 3D Audio 

Brian Schmidt 


4315 (29 (3D 

Artificial Intelligence in Computer Games 

Eric Dybsand 


4409 (3D 

Problems of Puzzle Game Design 

Alexey Pajitnov 


4509 G© G9 

The 3D Accelerator Market: A Primer 

Chris Donahue 


4316(29 (3D 

Artificial Intelligence in Computer Games 

Steve Woodcock 


4410 (3D 

Designing for Community: How to Cope with the 
Problem Children of the Online World 

Dave Weinstein 


4510 (3D GJD 

Secrets of Successful Gaming Communities 

Amy Jo Kim 


4311 (3DQB 

Whither (or Wither) Wargames 

Mark Baldwin 


4411 (3D 

Multiple Intelligences and Killer Games Collide 

Margo Nanny 


4511 (3D 

Hey, What's Your Story? 

Creating a Richer World for Gameplay 

Larry Tuch 


4312 (3D 

Designing Multiplayer Console Games 

Steve Taylor 


4412 GD 4512 (3D G9 

Why Do Most Games Suck? Getting Quality Into the Rox FX vs Game Content: 

John Rae Grant when is Great Technology Not Enough 

James Daniel 



lis 






Room 



Ballroom A 

Convention Center 



10:00am -11:00am 



11:30am -12:30pm 



5106 G3 (3D 

Multiplayer Game Development: Networking SimCity 



jn Shankf 



5220 Keynote QD 

Herding Cats: 

How to Build, Manage and Sustain Successtul Teams 

Richard Hilleman 



Convention Center 



5102 GD 

How To Start and Grow An Independent Development 
Company 

Matthew Stibbe 



5208 (3D 

Designing Online Games tor the Mass Markets 

Mike Sellers 



101 A 

Convention Center 



5103 GD 

"So, You Want to Add video to Your Game.. 

Phil Saunders, Michel Kripalani, Tim Tembreull 



5203 GD (3D 

The Adventures of Don Quixote: 

Should I Build or License Game Technology? 

Paul Schuytema 



101 B 

Convention Center 



5118 GD 

Software Internationalization 

Anc Wilmunder 



5202 CZ3 

Real-Time 3D Art Ideas from Online Applications 

Stasia McGehee 



102 A 

Convention Center 



GO 



5101 GD GD 

Creating a Standard Technology Platform for Online 
Gaming 

Mark Vange 



5204 QD GD 

Hearing The World Through a Snorkel: 
Audio for Online Games 



Brad Derrick 



" 



CO 
CO 



102 B/C 

Convention Center 



5107 (3D 

Game Design: Do You Have What it Takes? 

Shannon Donnelly, Sam Palahnuk 



5205 GD 

Building a Better Mouse: Al Lessons From Artificial Life 

Robert Huebner 



103 A 

Convention Center 



5104 CD GD 5219 GD 

Sounds Like Chicken: PC Game Audio Technical Quality Beyond Games: How the Rest of the Business Works 



Tom Hays 



Kimberlee Bogen, Susan Lee-Merrow 



104 A 

Convention Center 



5117 GD 

Next Generation BSP Trees 

Bruce Naylor 



5201 GD (3D 

Crash and Burn: 

What Happened to the Car Wars License? 

Micah Jackson, Steve Jackson 



104 B 

Convention Center 



5119 Keynote CZ3 

The Need for Renaissance Men and Women in this 
Digital Age of Art 

Cyrus Lum 



5207 (3D 

Effectively Dsing Kids' Feedback & Play Testing in Game 
Design 

Mike Rotenberg 



104 C 

Convention Center 



5105 GD 

Lies, Damn Lies, and ASR Statistics: 
A Voice Processing Primer 

Neil Kirby 



5217 GD 

Porting Flight Sim '98 to Direct3D: 
Dragging a 15 Year Old Graphics Engine I 

Todd Laney 



i the 90s 



Regency A 

Hyatt 



5108 (3D GD 

The "Real" Expert's Panel: Kids 

Roger Holzberg 



5206 C23 G3 

You Want What? 

Scaleable Character Approaches for 3D Real-Time 

Paul Lewis 



GD AODIO 



GD BUSINESS & LEGAL 



(3D GAME DESIGN 





2:00pm - 3:00pm 



3:30pm - 4:30pm 



5:00pm - 6:00pm 



5317 GD 

Physics Q&A 

David Wu, Chris Hecker 



5406 GD 5504 (23 

Collision Detection in Pacman Ghost Zone: Collision Building Advanced Autonomous Al Systems tor Large 

Techniques in a 3D Environment for Man and Camera Scale Real-Time Simulations 

Gilbert Colgate John Laird 



5308 (3D 

Multiplayer Game Design: 
Game Developers' Chief Pitfalls 

Jonathan Baron 



5405 (2D (3D 

Bringing Engineering Discipline to Entertainment 
Development 



5505 (2D 

Physical Modeling for Games 

Michael Shantz 



Gordon Walton 









5320 GD 


5422 (3D 


5502 GB 


3D Audio 1D1 


70% Completed: Hello Writer! 


So You Have A Hit: 


Conrad Maxwell 


Katherine Lawrence 


How to Capitalize on Subsidiary Licenses 

Scott Shannon 



5301 GD 

Yen, Marks and Pesetas: 

Squeezing Every Penny out International 

Kirk Owen 



5419 QD 

Producing Audio For Riven: A Case Study 

Martin O'Donnell 



3:30pm - 5:30pm 

15421 GD(3D 
New Business Opportunities for Interactive Audio Producers and Composers 

Spencer Critchley, Ron Knight, Mark Miller, David Zabnskie 



5307 (3D 

10 Commandments for Writing Adventure Games 

Bob Bates 



5407 (3D QD 

Designing Women: Women in the Games Industry 

Ellen Guon Beeman, Sheri Graner Ray 



5506 (3D 

Critical Design Issues for Internet-enabled 
Multiplayer Games 

Yu-Shen Ng 



5303 GD (3D 

This ISN'T Rocket Science! 

Graeme Bayless 



5402 GD 5501 GB 

Why Are Some Teams More Effective Than Others? Benchmarketing 

Matthew Stibbe Andy Fischer 



5321 GD 

Debugging People Problems: 
Case Studies in Game Development 



5404 QD 

Getting the Most Out of 3D Accelerators 

Greg Corson 



John Rae-Grant 



5507 (3D GD 

Designing for Kids: 

Infusions of Life, Kisses of Death 

Carolyn Miller 



5306 GD CZ3 

State of the Art in 3D Real-lime Characters 

Jeff Lander 



5401 GB 

Business and Legal Essentials for Building Your 
Company: Avoiding Disaster and Positioning 
for Success 

Bruce Maximov 



5518 (2D 

Curved Surfaces vs. Discrete Multiresolution 
Models 

Murali Sundaresan 



5302 C3 (3D 

Artists And Game Design Documents: 
From Interpretation To Implementation 



Joshua Gordon 



5408 (3D GD 

Multiple Character Interaction Between Believable 
Characters 

Adam Frank, Andrew Stern 



5503 GD 

Asset Tracking and Database Design 

Brian Duncan, Tylor Hagerman 









GD 



PRODUCTION 



GZ3 VISUAL ARTS 




AME DEVELOP 





;izi 








Room 


10:00am - 11 :00am 11 :30am - 1 2:30pm 


M> 


201 A 

Convention Center 


■"5150 (29 *5250 fj^ ^"" 
Intel740 Graphics Accelerator Performance Tuning Intel740 Graphics Accelerator Performance Tuning 

Intel Intel 


ss 

23 

eo 

S 
g 

eo 


201 R 

Convention Center 


5155(39 5255(23 

PowerVR II Technology Overview Tips & Tricks of PowerVR's First & Second Generation 

PowerVR PowerVR 


202 A 

Convention Center 


5151GB 3252GB 

Making Your Games Available to the Over 1 Million Marketing with 30fx Interactive 
Members of the Internet Gaming Zone 3Dfx interactive 

Microsoft 


202 R 

Convention Center 


5152 GD 5252 QD 

What is the Future of Interactive Multichannel Audio on Giving Gamers Aural Satisfaction 

DVD-ROM? Aureal Semiconductor 
Dolby Laboratories 








a 


Beacon Rotunda 

Hyatt 


Special FX for Real Tune 3D Games 2^ Roundtable: 

Greg Hammond Optimizing for Pentium II Processor Platforms 

Mehmet Adalier, Peter Baker, Haim Barad, Micheal Julier, 
Kim Pallister, Jay Sturges 


Pacific 

Hyatt 


5120 (3D 

Where's the Content? 

Rusel DeMaria 


Regency C 

Hyatt 


5116G33 l m<3D n . „. „ 

Simulating Human Opponents in Action Games Computer Role-Playing Games 

John Grigsby Cathr y n Mata 9 a 


Regency 

Hyatt 


5125 (3D GB 5218 C3C© 

Whither (or Wither) Wargames Tne Marriage of Art and Code 

Mark Baldwin Talm 


Regency E 

Hyatt 


5121 5221 CZ3 

Voice Over and Localization *"• Tools: H™ ModelinB Discussion 

Bill Black, Charles de Vnes Lisa Washburn 


Regency F 

Hyatt 


5114QDG© 5214GD 

State of the Art in Authoring Systems mm Production 

Jamie Siglar Mark Da V 




SeaviewA 

Hyatt 


5109 GB CO 5209 GDGD 

Making Money, Making Software tE/VFEP ^.7 d . So . 1, S Il . D P. s,9n S rs: 

Ken Goldstein Why Can't We All Just Get Along? 

Brian Schmidt 


Seaview R 

Hyatt 


5110GB GZ3 ^ 2 1 ^ , 

The 3D Accelerator Market: A Primer Babes in Boyland: 

chns Donahue Exploding Myths AOout Women in the Game Industry 

Melissa Farmer 


Seaview C 

Hyatt 


5111(33 . 5 - 211 .Qp. . 

Problems of Puzzle Game Design ™ Va|,|e, V ! 

Alexey Pajitnov Mlke 5temmlee 


Shoreline A 

Hyatt 


5112 QD 5212(33 

The Future of Strategy Games Desinnin 9 Multiplayer Console Games 

Phil Stemmeyei Steve Taylor 


Shoreline R 

Hyatt 


5113 QD ™ 13 ? D< F > 

Multiple Intelligences and Killer Games Collide fflvstameCoiileiit: 

Margo Nanny When is Great Technology Not Enough 

James Daniel 






ifl 







2:00pm 3:00pm 



3:30pm - 4:30pm 



5:00pm - 6:00pm 



'^5350 (33 

Exploiting Parallelism in 3D Games Using a 
Multithreaded Game Application Framework 

Intel 



5450 GD 

Triangle Strip Generation for Real-lime 3D Games 

Intel 



5550 GD 

DirectSound Retained Mode (DSRM) 

Intel 



5351 (3D GD 

Creating Titles lor the ArcadePC 

Quantum3D 



5451 OB 

How and Why to Support Logitech Gaming Products 

Logitech 



R 



5352 (39 

Coding the Ideal Direct3D Game 

3Dlabs 



5452 (2D 

Optimizing Games for the Real 3D Starfighter with 
Intel740 

Real 3D 



5315 (2D 

q&A Roundtable: 

Optimizing for Pentium II Processor Platforms 

Mehmet Adalier, Peter Baker, Haim Barad, Micheal Julier, 
Kim Pallister, Jay Sturges 



"5414 (2D OB 

The Relationship with the Publisher....or How to 
the Master Without Becoming the Slave 

Joe Minton 



"5515CZ3 (2D 

Programmers Vs Artists 

Chris Fregien, Lane Roathe 



5415 CO 

Contract Artist vs. In-House Artist 

Dale Homburg, Jimmie Homburg 



5316 GDC23 

I Fahrenheit 



John Gwinner 



5409 GD (2D 

Designing Games to Use 3D Audio 

Brian Schmidt 



5516 (2D (2D 

Game Development Using Alternative Languages 

Kory Bncker 



5318 CO 

Art Tool Showdown! 

Terri Hannon 



5410 (3D 5517 (2D CO 

Design vs. Technology: Scalable Geometry 

How Will Technology Licensing Affect Development John Taiiey 



Mike Wilson 



5319 GD 

Voice Over and Localization 

Charles deVries, Bill Black 



5411 (3D OB 

Secrets of Successful Gaming Communities 

Amy Jo Kim 



5519 (3D 

Where's the Content? 

Rusel DeMaria 



5314 (2D 

Managing Game Development: 

Best Practices, from Concept to Production 

Forrest Workman 



5420 CO 

Game Art Styles: The Discussion 

Lynell Jinks 



5514 (2D 

Herding Cats: 

The Art of Managing Development 

Harald Seeley 



5309 OB (2D 

Dream Jobs and Nightmares: 

Working Environments in the Games Industry 

David Roberts 



5416 (2D (3D 

Artificial Intelligence in Computer Games 

Neil Kirby 



5509 GD GD 

Tips and Techniques for Effective Sound Design 

James Ackley 



5310 (3D 

Premises in Story Games 

Hal Barwood 



5417 (2D (3D 

Artificial Intelligence in Computer Games 

Eric Dybsand 



5418 (2D QD 

Artificial Intelligence in Computer Games 

Steve Woodcock 



5510 OB 

Online Games: Niche or Mass Market? 

How Are Consumers "Paying" and Entertainment 

Providers Profiting? 

Rick Denny 



5511 (3D 

Designing for Community: How to Cope with the 
Problem Children of the Online World 






DaveWeinstein 



5312 (3D OB 5412 (3D 

How Can You Compete Against the World Wide Web? Hey, What's Your Story? 

Attracting and Keeping Those Darn Customers for Your Creating a Richer World for Gameplay 

Eric Goldberg Larry Tuch 



5512 (3D (2D 

The Console RPG Aftermath 

Gabriel Valencia 



5313 (3D 

Teamwork in Multiplayer Games: Adapting Old 
Gameplay to a New Medium 



Hamilton Chu 



5413 OB GD 

Getting into the Game Industry 

Darren Reid 



5513 (3DGD 

Fascist Game Design 

Anthony Farmer 




1123] 



MAPS 




LONG BEACH CONVENTION CENTER 

Lower Level 



Lobby Level 

n 



Press Lounge 




Coat Check 



um) 





VJ" 



f jgency Ballroi m 



v y j-y- K J 




Stairs 



P 



& 



i — ' 



Stair " 



and Escalator 



Beacon 
Rotunda 



HYATT REGENCY 

Third Level 
(Fourth Floor) 



Coatroom I 
and Women's 

Office 



L.n 



Men's 



Telephones 

VJ UT 



r r- 

v j — L/" 



Beacon Ballroom g 



c/3 



CU 
.03 




Seaview 
B 



I— IYI i m 








HYATT REGENCY 

Lower Level 
(First Floor) 




Tides 
Restaurant 




(125) 



Concession 



Vintage 
Arcade 



753 



1053 

Staccain 

»61 



McCarthy 
feamworx 
1963 



Marketing 



Ascension 

Tech 



■850 

EXPO FLOOR i= 



Creative Labs 



949 



Analfsn 
1181 

Darwin 
30 



Raindrop 
Geomagic 



Tritech 

Micro- 

electronics 



Mail 
CaU 



I2S3 

sen 



1262 

Jon Pedriie 

BM 

Adobe 
1258 

1256 
Zygite 

MM 

054 1255 

Disc Makers Peak 
1252 1253 

3DNan»3D Interact 
Accessaries 



1261 
TfreX 

I25S _ 
i America LnProOB 



Sega America 
1257 



Vector 
Graphics 



1356 

ll|ltSl! 



ON-LINE LIVIN I 



1455 




LONG BEACH 

CONVENTION 

CENTER 



844 
Zen 
Research 




fl043 
j40_ VR-1 

^^ 1 937 I |037 




Realtmation 



1243 



ELSA 



1343 



PoHieraas 

1443 



IBffle 

duality 
B3B^ 

Anneals 

834 

Minona 

830 



Zoran 

824 
The 
Duck 
Corp. 

818 

Qsound/ 
VLSI 

814 




Multigen 
1337 



Game tools 
1437 



1329 



AMD 



1429 



I lonos ATI 



3DLabs 



915 



3DFX 
Interactive 



1111 



Microsoft 



1317 




NAN I 



1305 



'\\ j-t -Q 









Terrace Theater 





ccelgraphics 


Infografica 


Game 
Developer 


1943 


2042 


Technology 


InstallsmeirT 


Vente.l 


Pavilion 


1941 


2040 




Sound Ideas 


Vision Scape 




1939 


2038 




Biovision 


Voxware 




1935 


2034 


2035 




Computer 
Graphics 
World 
2143 
Scileur 
2141 
Animatioo Mag 
2139 

2137 

Sony Platform 
2135 

Gelard 
2133 

Segasoft 




IWestwood 
[ 
I Intel 



Offices 




(12; 




SHUTTIE BUSES 

For your convenience, free shuttle buses will circulate between the 
Convention Center and the following CGDC hotels: 

BUS A QUEEN MARY 

WEST COAST HOTEL 

BUSB LONG BEACH MARRIOTT 

HOLIDAY INN AIRPORT 

BUS C SEAPORT MARINA HOTEL 

BEST WESTERN GOLDEN SAILS 

Shuttles will run at approximately 1 5 minute intervals, Monday through 
Friday, during the following hours: 



MONDAY 7 


30AM - 10:00PM 


TUESDAY 7 


30AM -11:00PM 


WEDNESDAY 7 


30AM -11:00PM 


THURSDAY 7 


30AM - 7:00PM 


FRIDAY 7 


30AM - 7:00PM 



All bus schedules are tentative. Please check the conference addendum for com- 
plete schedule. 



Long Beach Convention Center 


■ 


Best Western Golden Sails 


i*MM. 


Courtyard by Marriott 


Renaissance Hotel 


Holiday Inn Airport 


Seaport Marina Hotel 


Holiday Inn Downtown 


West Coast Long Beach Hotel 


Hotel Queen Mary 


Westin Long Beach 


Hyatt Regency 




■ 



jjm 




GETTING AROUND 

THE RUNABOUT 



W.Ommi 




ROUTE A, OCEAN BLVD 




Free downtown service running along Ocean 
Blvd. Runabouts A and D together provide 
service every seven minutes, from 7am to 
6pm weekdays and 10am to 5pm on 
Saturdays, Sundays, and Holidays. 

ROUTE B, PINE AVE. 

Free service downtown every six minutes. This 
service runs primarily along Pine Ave., from 
10am to 8:45pm every day. 

ROUTE C, QUEEN MARY 

Free shuttle service to Shoreline Village and 
the Queen Mary every 20 minutes. It runs 
downtown, primarily along Ocean Blvd. 

ROUTED BELMONT SHORE 

Service from downtown to Belmont Shore. 
Riders who travel beyond downtown pay reg- 
ular fare. 




r 



AME DEVELOP 






The Best in Game Development Technology 1 . 




The Miles Sound System 



Smacker is a compressor for video, animation and sound data designed 
specifically for games. Smacker has been used in all aspects of game 
design: cinematics, cut-scenes, video-sprites, transparent videos, 
image decompression, scrolling video backgrounds, and more. It has 
been used in over 400 games because it is fast (damn fast!), easy-to- 
implement, and available for most game platforms. 

The Smacker SDK is available for DOS, 16-bit Windows, Windows 
95, Windows NT, Win32, Mac, and PowerMac. The Smacker SDK 
API is identical across the platforms and includes everything necessary 
to playback videos with synchronized sound. 

For graphics. Smacker has builr-in support for VESA 1.x (direct 
decompression into banked video RAM) and VESA 2.0 (linear frame 
buffer support). Under Windows, Smacker supports WinG, 
CreateDIBSection, DispDIB, and DirectDraw. For the Mac, Smacker 
supports both GWorlds (with lightning-fast assembly blitters to 
augment CopyBits) and direct-to-screen decompression. Since 
Smacker can decompress into any linear piece of 8-bit or 16-bit (new!) 
memory, using it with your own graphics code or a third party library 
(such as MGL) is no problem. 

For sound, Smacker has built-in support for the Miles Sound System 
for DOS and Windows, DirecrSound for Windows 95 and NT, the 
Windows waveOut system, HMl's SOS library for DOS, 
Diamondware's STK, and Sound Manager lor the Macintosh. 

Smacker also now includes optimized assembly memory-blitters for lx, 
2x, 2x interlaced, and 2x smoothed (interpolated) modes to both 8-bit 
and 16-bit color surfaces (system or VRAM). Included are MMX and 
non-MMX versions for PC, and 68 K and PowerPC versions for Mac. 



Partial list of Smacker and/or Miles Sound System customers: 





Major new version now available! Check out these new features: 

Digital MIDI software synthesizer with DLS-1 support! 

Create MIDI files that will sound identical on all sound cards! 
DLS support means you can create and use your own instrument 
samples using standard DLS editors such as SynthAuthor from the 
MMA. Miles 4 includes a complete software synthesizer for both 
MMX and non-MMX machines, and built-in hardware support 
for S3 DLS sound cards! MIDI is back! 

Integrated IMA ADPCM support! 

ADPCM support gives you 4 to 1 compression with little quality 
loss. Better yet, ADPCM data is handled natively by the Miles 
sound mixer, so you don't even have to decompress the data before 
playing it! Cut your game's audio-RAM budget by 4! 

Of course. Miles 4.0 will include all of the features you loved in 
previous versions: digital mixing, multiple MIDI sequences, hard 
drive or CD-ROM streaming, interactive MIDI, powerful 
callbacks, red book CD-audio, DirectX support, and much more! 



The Smacker utilities are 
Simply download them from our 
at www.radgametoi 



FREEH 



over 1,800 games - see our wet-site for title lists! 



,e Smacker SDK and the Miles Sound System 
are licensed on a per-product or per-site 
basis with NO ROYALTIES WHATSOEVER! 

Call for discounts when you license both 
cker & the Miles Sound System together. 



801-322-4300 



801-32 
FAX 801-35 
s@radgametool 
adgametools.co 




GAME TOOLS